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    Thread: What to do with tofu: list your favorite recipes or dishes

    1. 01-20-2004 06:07 PM #1
      We don't eat a whole lot of meat around my house, but neither do we enjoy the soggy mush of flavorless blah that is fresh tofu. We have recently discovered that our local Asian market sells fried tofu in nicely prepackaged pouches and we've been buying these to use in curries and stir fries. Afaik, there isn't much else to do with them. We could fry our own, but have ventilation problems in our kitchen, so we avoid it. I'd like to hear your tips and tricks for preparing tofu, either fried baked, steamed, raw, sauteed, or "other." Right now, we're only using the fresh stuff for smoothies and in pasta dishes (ravioli, stuffed shells/ziti/manicotti, lasagna) where the flavor and texture is 100% masked by other ingredients. We'd love to learn more, but have no idea.

    2. Member GeoffD's Avatar
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      01-20-2004 11:16 PM #2
      In my opinion, the best thing to do with fresh Tofu is cut it into cubes and pan-fry them in a little peanut oil. If you use a wire mesh anti-spatter disk and don't use too much heat, you won't stink out the kitchen. You're sauteing them, not deep-frying them. You want all 6 sides browned and that takes quite a few minutes. This gives them quite a bit of texture rather than that bland mush. Serve them with steamed or pan-fried vegetables and oyster sauce over steamed rice. I like chinese broccoli but just about anything works OK. The critical part with oyster sauce is to buy a brand where oyster extract is the first ingredient listed on the ingredients list. The lousy grocery store brands are mostly other ingredients.

      The only other thing I use tofu for is hot & sour soup. I use a single julienned sirloin pork chop to add flavor but that's the only meat.


    3. 01-21-2004 10:25 AM #3
      Take the fresh tofu (get firm or extra firm... I wouldn't really recommend a silken for this...) cut it latereally into two or three flat "sheets" (about 3/4" thick) lay it flat on a clean kitchen towel, wrap it up, put a cutting board on it and put a couple cans on top (or a small kitchen appliance...) and let it sit for an hour or two.. that'll drain all the excess water out.
      While you're waiting, mix up a nice little marinade (I usually go with a mustard, soysauce, orange juice based sauce... or mix it up w/ some peanut butter) Take your pressed tofu sheets and cut them into cubes (about 3/4" cubed) and marinate them in the marinade... for a while. Then lay it all out on a baking sheet with sides (so you don't spill the excess sauce) bake it for about 20 minutes, flipping them over after about 10 minutes.
      Then, at this point (after baking) lightly fry them w/ very little oil (grapeseed doesn't have a strong taste to detract from the marinade... and it's really good for you.) Stirfry up some veggies and stir in the baked/lightly fried tofu and serve ofer Jasmine rice...
      Yum.

      Or, instead of cubing, you can cut them into longer strips... bake them, but don't fry. make a pita sandwich with them, hot or cold
      enjoy.

      -d.


    4. 01-21-2004 11:02 AM #4
      It's not vegetarian, but Ma Po Tofu is damn fine stuff. I usually make it with ground turkey instead of the more traditional ground pork. The original recipe was from an old Pei Mei cookbook, but it's so bastardized now I don't know if it could properly be called Ma Pao anymore. But it's good. I've seen recipes with oyster sauce, black bean sauce, brown sauce, but I much prefer the spicy bean paste variety (toban djan).


      I was trying to search for a recipe that's close to what I make (so I didn't have to type it out ) and I found this one: Open Kitchen
      The "My Kitchen" version is the closest, but those all look pretty good, so I might need to do some more experimenting...


    5. Member jodstr2's Avatar
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      01-21-2004 12:27 PM #5
      buy 'firm' style tofu, cut it up in cubes.
      sprinkle shoyu, sesame oil, lemon juice and sesame seeds on top.
      eat.

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      01-21-2004 01:40 PM #6
      lean meats & chicken
      tofu

    7. 01-21-2004 03:04 PM #7
      Quote, originally posted by slc92goddess »
      buy 'firm' style tofu, cut it up in cubes.
      sprinkle shoyu, sesame oil, lemon juice and sesame seeds on top.
      eat.

      nice

      I prefer soy, bonito flakes, and chopped green onions. Sometimes I go with Ponzu to add a little change. Makes the best breakfast ever!


    8. Member simple's Avatar
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      01-21-2004 07:23 PM #8
      Quote, originally posted by petesell »
      lean meats & chicken
      tofu

      Staten Island, NY hahaha

      Elliot: I still prefer baked tofu over any other type. Tastes the best and has good texture. I generally don't try to mask the flavor of tofu. I barely notice it is there unless it is "bean curd" style...

      If you can't measure it, you can't understand it; if you can't understand it, you can't control it.

    9. 01-27-2004 03:08 PM #9
      Quote, originally posted by detour1999 »
      Take the fresh tofu (get firm or extra firm... I wouldn't really recommend a silken for this...) cut it latereally into two or three flat "sheets" (about 3/4" thick) lay it flat on a clean kitchen towel, wrap it up, put a cutting board on it and put a couple cans on top (or a small kitchen appliance...) and let it sit for an hour or two.. that'll drain all the excess water out. Take your pressed tofu sheets and cut them into cubes (about 3/4" cubed) and marinate them in the marinade... for a while. Then lay it all out on a baking sheet with sides (so you don't spill the excess sauce) bake it for about 20 minutes, flipping them over after about 10 minutes.
      Then, at this point (after baking) lightly fry them w/ very little oil (grapeseed doesn't have a strong taste to detract from the marinade... and it's really good for you.) Stirfry up some veggies and stir in the baked/lightly fried tofu and serve ofer Jasmine rice...
      Yum.

      I really like this idea because it seems like it would make the tofu dry and crispy, like you get at restaurants. However, this is pretty time consuming for a weeknight dinner. Is it possible to do the baking part ahead of time, refrigerate, then fry up a day or three later?

      Bigelliot, I would love to see your manicotti/stuffed shells recipe using tofu.


      Modified by mgratzer at 12:11 PM 1-27-2004


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