Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    VWVortex


    Results 1 to 29 of 29

    Thread: what to do with cabbage?

    1. 02-01-2004 01:40 PM #1
      I have a head of cabbage I would like to use but I'm not sure what to do with it... anyone have any flavorful ideas that don't include mayonaise?

    2. Member
      Join Date
      Feb 25th, 1999
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      1,698
      Vehicles
      1999 Passat GLS - 2008 R32 - 2010 CX-7 GT
      02-01-2004 02:26 PM #2
      The 3 things I used cabbage for this week:

      1. Cabbage rolls
      2. Tapatios - easy to make cook some beef taquitos and place them on a plate. cover with finely chopped cabbage, onion, and tomatom. Add a dollop of guacamole and some sliced jalapenos. Serve with some refrieds on the side. Some good mexican food!
      3. Minestrone Soup


    3. 02-01-2004 02:35 PM #3
      Cut up cabbage and collard greens into 2" by 1" pieces, rinse well. Cook up some bacon throw the cabbage and greens into a pot with some butter, cover, let is cook down add the bacon in for flavoring and boo yah!! My dad taught me that one, straight from Oklahoma. I think I told you correctly, it's been a while since I've done it.

    4. 02-01-2004 02:59 PM #4
      Haluski w/Kapusta (Cabbage & Dumplings)


      • Melt 1/2 lb butter in pot. Fry in 2 chopped onions.

      • Add 1 small head of cabbage chopped.

      • Fry till browned. Add salt, pepper & garlic powder to taste.

      • Make a double batch of homemade dumplings (you may
      substitute wide noodles).

      • Mix into fried cabbage. Cook on low till hot.

      • Orgasm.


    5. 02-01-2004 03:19 PM #5
      Does anyone have any low-fat suggestions?

    6. Senior Member
      Join Date
      Sep 11th, 2000
      Location
      MA
      Posts
      25,489
      02-01-2004 04:43 PM #6
      Being Polish, kapusta above is always good.

      However, I posted these in the recipe thread. They are excellent, very easy to make, and keep for a long time.

      Italian Slaw

      1 medium head cabbage (2½ to 3 lbs.)
      1 large onion
      ½ cup sugar

      1 cup vinegar
      ¾ cup salad oil (I use olive oil)
      2 tsp. sugar
      1 tsp. salt
      1 tsp. dry mustard
      1 tsp. celery seed

      Shred the cabbage and place in a bowl in layers alternating with minced onion. Sprinkle with sugar. Bring remaining ingredients to a boil in a saucepan. Pour hot mixture over cabbage. Cover and let stand for 4-6 hours or refrigerate. Stir a few times to mix ingredients while marinating. Keeps well for 2-3 weeks.


      24-Hour Slaw
      (from Best of the Best New York Cookbook)

      “Do not serve until the next day.” This will keep for at least two weeks!

      1 medium head cabbage
      1 small onion, chopped fine
      1 green pepper, chopped
      1 carrot shredded
      ½ cup sugar

      Combine cabbage with onion, green pepper, and carrot. Sprinkle ½ cup sugar over top of mixed ingredients.

      DRESSING:
      1 cup vinegar
      ½ cup oil
      1 tsp. salt
      1 cup sugar
      1 tsp. prepared mustard
      1 tsp. celery salt
      1/8 tsp pepper

      Combine ingredients and boil 3 minutes. Add to cabbage mixture. Refrigerate 24 hours, then serve.


    7. 02-01-2004 05:58 PM #7
      Boil, steam, pickle, fry, bake, grill, or make slaw with it.

    8. 02-01-2004 06:34 PM #8
      boil kilbasa(white) with it in the water. i'm lithuanian. we know how to roll with cabbage heh

    9. Senior Member ClockworkChad's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 21st, 2003
      Location
      CT
      Posts
      21,553
      Vehicles
      Is300
      02-02-2004 02:44 PM #9
      make japanese moo shoo with it.

      Chop it thin, put it a wok with soy sauce, mushrooms, onion, carrots.....

      i just kinda made it up as i went along, but there are tons of recipes on the internet and they are low fat too!

      Ferrari Scuderia 2012 - "The people who speak badly about me then tremble and cry when they want to have their picture taken with me” - F. Alonso
      Now recruiting for IT/financial/accounting/creative services in fairfield county and metro nyc, pm if interested

    10. Member jodstr2's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 12th, 2001
      Location
      lounging in the yarn stash
      Posts
      3,403
      Vehicles
      14 RS5, 01 S4, 14 SQ5 on order
      02-03-2004 11:30 AM #10
      chop into thin slivers

      mix with:
      broken up uncooked ramen noodles
      chopped green onions
      sesame seeds
      sesame oil
      sugar
      shoyu

      voila! instant "asianish" salad.

      also good mixed in:
      sliced almonds
      dried cranberries


    11. 02-03-2004 02:43 PM #11
      wear it as a hat, run around the neighborhood in your underwear with your arms out to your sides making airplane noises.

    12. Member quasil's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 23rd, 2003
      Location
      Maryland
      Posts
      1,915
      Vehicles
      2000 Jetta VR6
      02-03-2004 04:42 PM #12
      Asian slaw

      Cabbage of course

      3-4 scallions (sliced)

      2 Tbsp sesame oil (dark)
      2 Tbsp vegetable oil
      2 Tbsp soy sauce
      1 Tbsp white vinegar
      1/3 cup sugar

      Mix the dressing in a bowl - taste - you may want to add a little more soy or vinegar

      Sesame seeds toasted (approximately 1/4 cup)

      Mix everything together and eat!


    13. Member
      Join Date
      Jul 3rd, 2003
      Location
      NEW JERSEY
      Posts
      3,490
      02-04-2004 11:42 PM #13
      take only the outter layer......

      fry up some ground beef and pork and add some cooked rice....roll the meat up in it with some red gravy,,,,its good

      slaughterhouse.

    14. 02-05-2004 12:24 AM #14
      My mom always used to fry up red cabbage in vinegar. It was great, I loved that stuff - it's still the only way I'll eat red cabbage.

    15. Senior Member
      Join Date
      Sep 11th, 2000
      Location
      MA
      Posts
      25,489
      02-05-2004 06:39 AM #15
      Good timing! This was just in the local newspaper:

      Wednesday, February 4, 2004

      Say goodbye to stinkiness of cooking cabbage; stir-fry it

      Tommy C. Simmons
      THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

      BATON ROUGE, La.- You may think it's not possible, but here's how to prepare cabbage that both tastes and smells good.

      It's a Southern custom to eat black-eyed peas and cabbage on New Year's Day to bring you good luck and wealth in the coming year - but you can cook up cabbage any day of the year, especially now as a hardy winter green.

      So: If you avoid preparing cabbage because of the unpleasant smell it emits when it's cooking, avoid no more. Go buy a medium-size, firm, heavy head of cabbage and try a method of cooking cabbage that is quick, easy enough for a novice cook to do, and doesn't stink up the kitchen.

      It's stir-frying shredded cabbage in a wok.

      I had never heard of stir-frying cabbage. The only way cabbage is served at my in-laws is boiled, which isn't bad tasting, but it's not an appealing dish to make because of the sulfuric smell the cabbage gives off as it cooks down.

      Walk into a kitchen where cabbage is being boiled and you know it immediately from the very pronounced and, unfortunately, lingering rotten-egg smell.

      Stir-fried cabbage doesn't cook long enough to release the minerals in the cabbage leaves which produce the unpleasant hydrogen sulfide odor as they heat up and break down.

      After doing some research on stir-frying cabbage, I discovered that many cooks have favored this method of preparing cabbage for years.

      At a holiday party, my friend Jocelyn Horton mentioned that she loves to fix cabbage. She always stir-fries it, and guests like the cabbage so much they ask for seconds. There never is a shred left in the wok, Horton said.

      When I was buying heads of cabbage to test this stir-frying cabbage cooking technique, I ran into another cook, Vera Bahlinger, who also said that she stir-fries cabbage. However, in her recipe, she first makes a roux and then stir-fries the cabbage in the roux.

      Because this is a high-heat method of cooking, the size of the cabbage slice or shred isn't critical. The smaller or thinner the shred, the faster it cooks.

      If you really want no-hassle cabbage preparation, buy a pre-shredded cabbage coleslaw mix and stir-fry the coleslaw. With no cutting or slicing time allotted, you can sit down to a plate of hot stir-fried cabbage in 15 minutes or less.

      I've included several stir-frying variations to try. Keep it simple, and you'll find you actually look forward to preparing cabbage for the dinner table.

      CHINESE CABBAGE 1 small head cabbage, quartered, cored and sliced into thin shreds 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 clove garlic, minced 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger 2 teaspoons soy sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1 tablespoon sesame seedsHeat oil in a large skillet or wok over high heat until it ripples. Add the garlic and ginger. Cook 1 minute stirring constantly.

      Add the cabbage and stir-fry until wilted but still tender crisp (takes about 2 minutes).

      Stir in soy sauce and sesame oil. Sprinkle in sesame seeds and cook 1 minute. Serve immediately. Makes 4 servings.

      CABBAGE AND PEAS 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 medium onion, chopped 1 medium head cabbage (about 2½ pounds), quartered, cored and cut into slices 10-ounce package frozen green peas 1½ teaspoons salt ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper 2 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or parsleyIn a large skillet or wok, heat oil over medium heat; add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, 5 minutes or until onion is tender and golden.

      Stir in cabbage, peas, salt, crushed red pepper and 2 tablespoons water. Increase heat to high and cook, stirring frequently, for about 10 minutes or until cabbage is tender crisp. Sprinkle with thyme or parsley. Makes 6 servings.

      CABBAGE AND BACON 6 or 7 slices of bacon 1 bell pepper, chopped 1 onion, chopped 1 medium head cabbage, quartered, cored and cut into slices ¼ teaspoon black pepperCook bacon over medium-high heat in a wok until bacon is thoroughly crisped. Remove bacon and drain on paper towel. When bacon has cooled, crumble it into little pieces and set aside.

      Stir chopped bell pepper and onion into hot bacon grease still in the wok, and cook bell pepper and onion until softened.

      Stir in sliced cabbage, mix all the chopped vegetables together and then increase heat to high. Stir-fry the cabbage and vegetables until cabbage is tender-crisp. Season with black pepper. Remove from wok and sprinkle with bacon crumbles. Makes 6 servings.

      STIR-FRIED CABBAGE 1 small head cabbage 1 tablespoon soy sauce ½ tablespoon sugar 2 tablespoons water ½ tablespoon cornstarch 2 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon oilCut the cabbage into eight equal wedges, then cut each wedge into equal triangular pieces. Set aside.

      Combine the soy sauce, sugar and 2 tablespoons water to form a sauce. Set aside.

      Combine the cornstarch and other 2 tablespoons water; set aside.

      Heat the oil in a wok over high heat until hazy. Add the cabbage and stir-fry for 2 minutes.

      Stir in the sauce and continue to stir-fry for another 2 minutes or until only half the liquid remains. Slowly add the cornstarch mixture until the mixture thickens. Makes 4 servings.

      HOT CABBAGE CREOLE 2 slices bacon 1 large onion, chopped 1 large green pepper, chopped 28-ounce can whole tomatoes, chopped (reserve juice) 1 head cabbage, cored and cut in thin slices 2 teaspoons salt ¼ teaspoon pepper Cayenne pepperCut up bacon and fry in large pan. Add onion and green pepper and saute with bacon. Add tomatoes and juice. Stir. Add cabbage, salt and pepper. Increase heat to high. Sprinkle lightly with cayenne pepper.

      Stir-fry the cabbage with the tomatoes, green pepper and onion just until the cabbage is tender crisp, which takes about 7 minutes. Makes 8 servings.

      Tips on buying and cooking cabbage:

      Buy a head of cabbage which is firm and heavy for its size. Lightweight cabbage indicates loss of moisture and, therefore, flavor.

      Look for heads with large, deep gray-green outer leaves that almost look like elephant ears. As green cabbage gets older in storage, it whitens. The darker-colored outer leaves indicate freshness.

      Head cabbage will last for a week or more wrapped in a plastic bag in the high-humidity crisper section of the refrigerator. Never wash cabbage before storing.

      To slice, peel off the tough outer leaves. Cut into quarters and cut away the core. Put the quarters, flat side down, on a cutting board and slice or shred crosswise. Shredding is simply slicing very thin.

      A 1½-pound cabbage yields between 6 and 8 cups of shredded cabbage. Figure on 4 ounces or 1½ cups per serving.

      After using part of a cabbage head, wrap the rest in plastic wrap and refrigerate in the crisper section. A sliced head will keep for about two days.


    16. 02-05-2004 04:17 PM #16
      Low fat suggestion ahoy! I'm going from memory though, so this may need a bit of tweaking.


      1 yellow onion, chopped
      1/2 head of cabbage, cored and chopped
      1/2 lb lean pork loin, sliced thinly
      1/2 lb thin rice noodles
      2 TB soy sauce
      1 tsp paprika
      1 tsp sesame oil
      High-temp oil for cooking (peanut, canola, safflower, etc)
      Fresh ground pepper to taste

      Chop and slice all ingredients.

      In a large bowl, soak the rice noodles in hot, almost boiling water until soft (about 15 minutes). Drain, cover to keep warm, and set aside.

      In a wok with a lid on medium high heat, heat 1 tsp sesame oil and 1 tsp regular oil. Saute onion until softened, about 3 minutes. Add pork and cook for another minute, until outside starts to brown. Reduce heat to medium, add cabbage and cover, until pork is cooked and cabbage is slightly wilted. Add the soy sauce, paprika, and pepper, toss to mix. Add noodles and mix thoroughly; serve.

      Very tasty and easy, you can also add julienned carrot or chopped red pepper with the onion, add chili flakes, oil or paste to spice it up, or use other kinds of sauce (hoisin, oyster, stir-fry) instead of soy sauce for a different flavor.

      As the above poster mentioned, cabbage is good in stir-fry, I use it in yakisoba too.


      Modified by mgratzer at 1:19 PM 2-5-2004


    17. Member impact's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 6th, 2002
      Posts
      5,195
      Vehicles
      2006 Škoda Octavia
      02-07-2004 05:39 AM #17
      Quote, originally posted by GMoney »
      Haluski w/Kapusta (Cabbage & Dumplings)


      • Melt 1/2 lb butter in pot. Fry in 2 chopped onions.

      • Add 1 small head of cabbage chopped.

      • Fry till browned. Add salt, pepper & garlic powder to taste.

      • Make a double batch of homemade dumplings (you may
      substitute wide noodles).

      • Mix into fried cabbage. Cook on low till hot.

      • Orgasm.

      This may sound weird but it's true... pasta with cabbage is delicious.


    18. 02-07-2004 06:57 PM #18
      Throw it off your deck!

    19. Member GolfGuy2003's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 8th, 2001
      Location
      Northeast Ohio
      Posts
      1,187
      Vehicles
      2010 Golf TDI DSG & 2002 Golf 2.0
      10-23-2008 09:04 PM #19
      Does anyone have any good suggestions to pickle cabbage?

    20. 10-23-2008 09:40 PM #20
      Definitely the best cabbage recipe...I make this all the time with an Asian style grilled flank steak.

      Asian Slaw

      Ingredients:
      1 head cabbage (about 5cups sliced)
      1 bag shredded carrots
      1c. chopped green onions
      4T rice wine vinegar
      4T sugar
      1tsp red chili paste (or 1 finely chopped jalapeno)
      1T finely chopped ginger
      1T sesame oil
      Salt & Pepper

      1. Thinly slice the cabbage and put it in a large bowl. Add shredded carrots and green onions.
      2. In medium saucepan, heat the vinegar and sugar together until the sugar dissolves.
      3. Remove pan from the heat and add in the chili paste (or jalapeno) and the finely chopped ginger. Stir around to incorporate. Let this stand for about 2 minutes to get the flavors going.
      4. Pour the liquid over the cabbage and toss to combine.
      5. Add sesame oil and salt/pepper to taste. Keep testing the flavor as it may need more salt or sesame oil. But, be careful not to put too much sesame or it will totally overpower the whole slaw!
      6. Put the slaw in the fridge and occasionally pull it out and mix it around.

      You'll want to prep the slaw about 30-45 minutes before you plan to eat it because the flavors get more intense as it sits and the liquid helps to wilt down the cabbage.

      Everyone I've ever made this for LOVES it! Good luck.


    21. 10-24-2008 08:29 AM #21
      Quote, originally posted by jodstr2 »
      chop into thin slivers

      mix with:
      broken up uncooked ramen noodles
      chopped green onions
      sesame seeds
      sesame oil
      sugar
      shoyu

      voila! instant "asianish" salad.

      also good mixed in:
      sliced almonds
      dried cranberries

      +1

      is was going to suggest the same, great salad.


    22. 10-24-2008 10:00 AM #22
      throw it out and roast a chicken

    23. Member ribguy's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 18th, 2008
      Location
      Lewiston, Idaho
      Posts
      1,807
      Vehicles
      1980 Rabbit 1Z , 1984 Rabbit 2Z
      10-24-2008 10:14 AM #23
      cut into quarters and rub with olive oil and grill them until they are done the way you like them

    24. 10-24-2008 10:44 AM #24
      pickle it

    25. Senior Member VWVan's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 17th, 2000
      Location
      Langley, B.C.
      Posts
      24,903
      Vehicles
      2007 Ford Fusion SUX, school bus turning radius edition
      10-24-2008 01:25 PM #25
      If you punch the cabbage, its makes the all familiar sound of someone being punched in the face like on tv or in the movies.

      Cabbage soup. Family favorite during soviet occupied Berlin after the war


    26. Member veedub87's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 17th, 2003
      Location
      Phoenix, Arizona USA
      Posts
      5,584
      Vehicles
      2002 VW GTI - 2001 Kawasaki W650 - 1975 Yamaha RD350
      10-24-2008 01:42 PM #26
      Quote, originally posted by G20t »

      Cabbage soup. Family favorite during soviet occupied Berlin after the war

      Easy, and I love it. Gonna make some today. My recipe is mentally disabled simple. Cut up cabbage. Open big can of v8 juice. Chop up celery. Chop up onions. Pepper to taste. Put in crockpot. Eat 8 hours later.


    27. Member BlckBadged_SwissChee's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 7th, 2002
      Posts
      16,787
      Vehicles
      2001 Jetta WE
      10-24-2008 01:58 PM #27
      I personally would throw it away.....or go see a ****ty band or comedian.
      Th(e/a)n

    28. Member chetacer's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 23rd, 2002
      Location
      ON
      Posts
      5,498
      Vehicles
      E90 325xi, '00 Jetta TDI
      10-24-2008 10:47 PM #28
      1. Get a slab of corned beef or brisket, some onions and potatoes.

      2. Cut the cabbage, onion, and potatoes into large-ish chunks.

      3. Boil everything together in a big stockpot until tender.

      You got yourself a boiled dinner.


    29. 10-28-2008 07:07 AM #29
      boil it, and serve it with wursts, and some pickled beets to go mit also

      und a good schwarzbier


    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •