Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    VWVortex


    Results 1 to 24 of 24

    Thread: Ceramic Coating Manifold - Worth the price?

    1. 02-15-2004 02:41 PM #1
      I'm picking up a used manifold with external wastegate for an ABA motor. Is it worth it to send it out to be ceramic coated?

      If so, what sort of pricing should I be looking at for this process?


    2. Member veedub11's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 9th, 2002
      Location
      Shaw District DC
      Posts
      11,106
      Vehicles
      MK6 GTI Autobahn (Past: MK4 Golf TDI, MK3 Surf Green GTI 2.0T, Corrado VR)
      02-16-2004 03:49 PM #2
      I was gonna do it but I don't think the gains are worth the price. I was quoted at $115 for the manifold.

    3. Member speed51133!'s Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 5th, 2002
      Location
      alexandria va/milwaukee wi
      Posts
      7,691
      Vehicles
      02 audi tt 225 / mk3 jetta /audi 5000s turbo
      02-16-2004 03:50 PM #3
      i spent like 200$ US to coat my exhaust manifold.

      happy i did it because it took like 40 hours for me to make, and i want it to last a lifetime for me, or someone who buys it!


    4. Senior Member TBT-Syncro's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 28th, 2001
      Location
      Vancouver
      Posts
      20,358
      Vehicles
      92 VR-T syncro GTI, 2011 husaberg FS570, 2014 Aprilia Tuono V4 APRC
      02-16-2004 04:11 PM #4
      if you do it, make sure you do the outside AND the inside.

    5. 02-16-2004 04:37 PM #5
      depends on what your coating. When i got headers for my z28, it was $100 extra to have them coated versus painted. Mind you this was aluminum but for the amount of material (yes they are massive) and two pieces. I'd say go for it.

      But shop around for various places that do various ceramic coatings. Not all coatings are alike.

      The stuff will rust too, if abused enough. its easy to scratch, rock chip, whatever the piece, rust is like cancer it will eat from the inside, so its not the holy grail by any means.

      stainless might be a choice if its applicable to your needs.


    6. Senior Member TBT-Syncro's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 28th, 2001
      Location
      Vancouver
      Posts
      20,358
      Vehicles
      92 VR-T syncro GTI, 2011 husaberg FS570, 2014 Aprilia Tuono V4 APRC
      02-16-2004 08:33 PM #6
      well then you need to find a shop that can do it properly. Arguably, it's more important to do the inside, as apposed to the outside.

    7. 02-16-2004 08:50 PM #7
      inside more important?? uh...

      coatings come in many flavors and offer different characteristics. So you may want to coat the inside to prevent internal rusting, but you definitely want to coat the outside to keep the heat in.


    8. Senior Member TBT-Syncro's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 28th, 2001
      Location
      Vancouver
      Posts
      20,358
      Vehicles
      92 VR-T syncro GTI, 2011 husaberg FS570, 2014 Aprilia Tuono V4 APRC
      02-16-2004 09:31 PM #8
      you coat the inside to keep the heat in (and thereby through the manifold). the purpose is to reflect the heat before it's hit the soak element- not after.

    9. 02-17-2004 05:40 AM #9
      You should be looking to spend in the neighborhood of $100 to get the entire manifold coated. Is it worth it to you??? That's something only you can answer... personally I don't like to cut corners...

    10. Member speed51133!'s Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 5th, 2002
      Location
      alexandria va/milwaukee wi
      Posts
      7,691
      Vehicles
      02 audi tt 225 / mk3 jetta /audi 5000s turbo
      02-17-2004 11:30 AM #10
      what kind of temps is that 100$ going to cover?

      my 200$ coating is good to like 2300 deg F.


    11. 02-17-2004 12:09 PM #11
      ya make sure you get real ceramic coating, it only comes in flat white as far as i've ever seen...

      powder coating may look pretty but doesn't do sh!t


    12. 02-17-2004 06:06 PM #12
      Quote, originally posted by peteM3 »
      ya make sure you get real ceramic coating, it only comes in flat white as far as i've ever seen...

      I'm not so sure I'd make that assertion...
      http://www.finishlinecoatings.com/faq.html


    13. Member Scooter98144's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 15th, 2002
      Location
      Renton Wa
      Posts
      2,758
      Vehicles
      1995 VW GTI Supercharged VR6
      02-17-2004 06:21 PM #13
      I ported and polished the VR6 castings and had them and the down pipe ceramic coated. It did not cost much and really cut down on the INTENSE heat. It is still hot just not near so bad. I would always start on the exhaust side for coating.

      I then had the upper intake manifold coated in a heat dissipating black ceramic. Now I can not honestly say what good that did. But it looks COOL and no longer corrodes..

      So in that sense it was worth it.



    14. 02-18-2004 09:03 PM #15
      Quote, originally posted by Flat Black »
      http://www.swaintech.com/header.html

      I just got mine back from swaintech on Tuesday. Looks real good. I have pictures I will try to put up later. I will be doing some temp. tests between my friends non-coated manifold and my coated one. I am also having the exhaust housing and dowpipe done.


    15. Member
      Join Date
      Apr 22nd, 2002
      Location
      NJ 08002
      Posts
      4,502
      Vehicles
      1 clunker & 2 nicer clunkers
      02-19-2004 03:23 PM #16
      When I called to have pistons and combustion chambers done, I called Jet Hot, because I used them before.

      Found out they don't even do engine internals anymore... just headers and intakes. They only do the inners of the intakes, because of the flaking problem.

      Ended up sending everything to Thermotech in Va. They used Tech-Line Coatings. Ended up paying roughly $300 to do pistons, skirts, combustion chambers, and valve faces and stems. They offered the best prices that I found.

      I broke the motor down roughly 3 months later because of a valve guide problem... the coating was fine on all of the parts except for the stems.


    16. Member speed51133!'s Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 5th, 2002
      Location
      alexandria va/milwaukee wi
      Posts
      7,691
      Vehicles
      02 audi tt 225 / mk3 jetta /audi 5000s turbo
      02-19-2004 03:40 PM #17
      dont even tell me about jet hot's flaking problems......


      ceramic coating is all BS if you ask me. BUT, it does prevent rust. that should be the ONLY reason you get it IMO.


    17. Member
      Join Date
      Jan 19th, 2002
      Location
      Victoria, BC
      Posts
      2,321
      Vehicles
      '91 B3 16vTurbo Passat
      02-19-2004 03:44 PM #18
      I just got my valve cover and intake manifold, lower and upper, ceramic coated aluminum. I did not want to risk getting the interior done and possibly have it flake off into my new rebuilt head. I do know that the "look" is one of the main reasons I got it done and because it is super easy to keep clean now.

    18. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2001
      Location
      Portland OR
      Posts
      5,961
      Vehicles
      1990 VW Corrado
      02-29-2004 11:53 PM #19
      Ceramic coating is a great idea
      the basic principle here is that if you insulate parts of an engine, you keep
      more heat in the working fluid, the air/fuel mixture. the engine in your car is
      about 30% efficient, which means that only 30% of the heat generated by the
      combustion of fuel and air actually gets used to drive the wheels. twice as much
      60%, goes into the cooling system and engine oil and is dissipated into the
      surrounding air. you need the cooling just to keep the metal materials in the engine
      from melting. the remaining 10% goes out the exhaust pipe. if you can
      retain more of that 60% lost heat in the working fluid, you get a more efficient
      engine which puts out more power with less fuel.insulation on piston tops
      and combustion chamber surfaces keep heat out of the water and oil. if in addition
      to more power and less fuel comsumption, the engine needed smaller oil and water coolers
      then the whole car gets smaller and lighter. less heat and friction inside an engine is a very
      big deal in a race engine.
      for more information on prices check out
      http://www.skperformance.com/PRICING_INFO.htm
      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GKS...80UVORSMiYMNQg

    19. 03-02-2004 08:18 PM #20
      I forgot to put a couple pics up.


    20. 03-03-2004 02:40 PM #21
      That coating looks incredibly smooth

      I did the cheap way. wrapped insulating band around my manifold.

      Keeping the temperature and volume before the turbo is important...
      espesially if you have a manifold designed to keep ignition pulses...

      Mr.Bond.



    21. Banned
      Join Date
      May 12th, 2002
      Posts
      1,053
      03-03-2004 08:16 PM #23
      VRQUICK, how did it cost, total with shipping.?

    22. 03-03-2004 08:24 PM #24
      $135 + $16 for shipping.

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •