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    Thread: DIY - VR6 12v Oil Change

    1. Member
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      12-27-2004 08:50 PM #1
      I haven't seen a really good one of these out there, so whipped this up while I was changing the oil on my VR6 last weekend.

      CHANGING THE OIL AND OIL FILTER ON A MKIV 12V VR6

      The following procedure will outline the steps to change the oil and oil filter on a MKIV VR6, 12V. It is important to remember that the procedures are different whether you have a 12V or a 24V. For changing your oil on a 24V, refer to http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=650410. Much respect to jbrams for doing the original work on this.

      There are many avenues of thought on replacing your oil. Some opt with the 3000 mile religious routine, while others run their synthetic for upwards of 15000 miles. I fall somewhere in-between; I change mine every 5000 miles. This DIY is not intended to tell you when to change your oil, but how.

      I replace my fuel filter every other oil change as well, so see http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1276409 for that procedure (respect to alchu for his excellent DIY).

      The procedure was based on a '00 MKIV Jetta GLX 12v VR6. The procedure should be valid for '99.5 - '02 12v VR6.

      Please be careful when performing the below steps. I always label all my loose parts or place the small ones in plastic bags and label them so I know where they go.

      It took me approximately 1 hour to complete the oil change (including time to clean my K&N and take pictures). Depending on how good you are with tools, it may take you more or less time.

      First, for the parts list. I recommend a VW OEM oil filter, but your local Autozone or Advance Auto Parts will have a filter that works.

      Parts
      1) Oil Filter (includes large rubber O-ring) - VW# 021-115-562A - $10.40
      2) 6 Quarts of your favorite motor oil: see http://www.vw.com/SP/pdf/oilchart.pdf for more information.
      3) Oil collection facility (waste oil collector)

      Now, the tools.

      Tools
      1) One jack
      2) Two jackstands
      3) A Torx 25 screwdriver (Torx 20 will work)
      4) 6mm (optional)
      5) 36mm socket (optional) or a strap wrench / channel locks
      6) 19mm socket
      7) Socket wrench
      8) Small blade screwdriver
      9) Torque wrench

      Please be careful. Do this procedure at your own risk, I can't be held responsible if I have made a mistake in the steps.


      Examining your parts

      i. Before you begin, first examine your parts to make sure you have all the parts. You should have everything shown below. Starting from the upper right and going clockwise you see the oil filter, the O-ring, 1 quart of oil (you need 6), and your waste oil collector.

      ii. Drive your car to the location where you will be performing the maintenance. Apply the parking brake and put the transmission in neutral. Make sure you have plenty of light in the area you will be working.

      Draining the old oil

      1. If the car is not already warm, start the engine and run the car until it is warm.

      2. Once it is warm, shut off the engine and jack up the front end of the car.

      3. Remove the splash guard from under the vehicle with a Torx 25 screwdriver. There are four bolts, two on each side.

      4. Using the 19mm socket, loosen but do not remove the oil pan drain plug. The drain plug is located towards the rear of the oil pan.

      5. Place your waste oil collector underneath the drain plug. Move it approximately 6" towards the back of the vehicle to accommodate the oil as it flows out of the oil pan.

      6. While pressing in on the drain plug, slowly unscrew the plug from the pan. Note: The plug may be extremely hot, so take the appropriate precautions. I use a rag to remove the drain plug.

      7. Once the drain plug is all the way unscrewed, quickly remove the drain plug. A steady stream of oil will flow out of the oil pan and into your waste oil collector (assuming you've positioned it correctly).

      8. While you are waiting, inspect your drain plug for damage. VW recommends replacing the drain plug every oil change, but this is unnecessary. However, a damaged drain plug may need to replaced, as in the picture below.

      9. Once most of the oil has been drained, reinstall the drain plug. Tighten it to 30 Nm.

      10. Now for the messy part. Place your waste oil collector underneath the oil filter housing. Some people choose to remove the oil filter housing plug and drain the oil filter housing prior to removal.

      Personally, I think this is a waste of time. But should you choose this method, remove the oil filter housing plug with a 6mm hex wrench and drain the housing.

      Instead, I prefer to remove the oil filter housing as one unit. To do so, loosen but do not remove the oil filter housing with a 36mm socket. You can also use a strap wrench or a channel lock pliers.

      11. As you loosen the oil filter housing, you will begin to see oil leak from the threads of the housing. This is normal since you have not previously drained the housing by removing the oil filter housing plug.

      12. Once the oil filter housing has drained, fully remove it and pour out the excess oil into your drain pan.

      13. Next, remove the oil filter from the oil filter housing. You may need to wiggle it a bit to get it out, but be careful not to break the plastic guide piece.

      14. Once you have removed the oil filter, take a look inside the housing for any foreign material. An excess of anything can indicate a problem in your lubrication system.



      15. Using a small flathead screwdriver, remove the old O-ring.

      16. I usually take this chance to clean the oil filter housing using a lint free cloth. Wipe off the threads, the O-ring seats, and the bottom of the housing.

      Installing the new filter and adding oil

      17. Install the new oil filter by placing the large hole in the bottom of the oil filter over the plastic guide and pushing the oil filter into the oil filter housing. When it seats properly, you will hear a satisfying "click" and the filter will be held firmly in the housing.

      18. Next, install the new O-ring. Dip it into some new motor oil and coat the entire O-ring with oil using your fingers. Then slide it around the oil filter, past the oil filter housing threads, and into the O-ring seat.

      19. Set the oil filter housing on top of the waste oil collector, and fill the oil filter housing with new motor oil. To do this, pour the oil into the small hole at the top of the oil filter. It will probably take 1/4 to 1/2 a quart of oil.

      20. Reinstall the filter housing, taking care not to drip any oil in your eyes while you are screwing it in. If you have a 36mm socket, torque the oil filter housing to 30 Nm. If you do not, just make it reasonably tight, you do not want the oil filter housing coming loose.

      21. Check to make sure your drain plug is installed and torqued properly.

      22. Pop the hood, and unscrew the oil fill cap.

      23. Fill the engine with just under 6 quarts of your favorite motor oil. The engine spec is normally 5.8 quarts, but it will handle 6 with no problem if you happen to overfill.

      24. Reinstall the oil fill cap.

      25. Close the hood.

      26. Reinstall the splash shield with the 4 Torx-25 screws.

      27. Lower the vehicle.

      28. After starting the car, drive it around the block, let it warm up, then check for leaks.

      That's it! Email me with questions if you have any, I'd be happy to answer them!


      Modified by FaelinGL at 7:14 PM 10-2-2005


      Modified by FaelinGL at 7:30 PM 12-9-2005

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    2. 12-27-2004 09:13 PM #2
      Nice work Mike. It's about time someone put this together for the 12v.

      FYI, I'd recommend removing the drain plug in the filter housing to drain the housing before removing the cap. It makes the job significantly less messy. If you do this, barely a drop will spill when you remove the filter cap.

      I'm adding this to the DIY thread.

      Gary


    3. 12-27-2004 09:30 PM #3
      Two more things. What's the 8mm hex wrench for? Also, IIRC, the four (4) screws that secure the plastic belly pan are actually T25 Torx, but T20 will also work.

      Gary


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      12-27-2004 09:39 PM #4
      Nice.....but my additions would be:

      Put a large piece of cardboard under the drain pan so you don't mess up your garage floor

      Also.....the step where you add oil into the filter is unncessary in my opinion. That's just a matter of preference I guess.


    5. Member RavinJetta's Avatar
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      12-27-2004 09:39 PM #5
      Great writeup. Thanks

    6. Member OptimusGlen's Avatar
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      12-27-2004 09:53 PM #6
      hahaha, nice gloves MJ

    7. Member gehr's Avatar
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      12-27-2004 10:16 PM #7
      Quote, originally posted by FaelinGL »


      Great write up! You makey spilly mess though


    8. Member vasillalov's Avatar
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      12-27-2004 11:03 PM #8
      good job!
      Quote Originally Posted by MAG58 View Post
      Please consider your audience before saying something sensible. 80% of TCL drivers were actually banned from Formula 1 for being too fast.
      A turbocharger is a device in where exhaust gases go in, witchcraft happens, and then you go faster.

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      12-27-2004 11:19 PM #9
      The other suggestion is to use a 36mm socket to remove the oil filter housing. A socket is cheaper than buying a oil filter housing in the future. Plus you can also torque it to it's proper tightness with a socket.

    10. Member MacDalund's Avatar
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      12-28-2004 05:10 AM #10
      Rich Green
      2000 Jetta VR6

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      12-28-2004 06:04 AM #11

      I like making messy spills!

      Gary, extra tool, my bad.

      Mike VR6, you are absolutely right, it is a matter of personal preference. I always want to fill the filter myself with oil instead of having the oil pump do it since that diverts flow away from the engine components, and you are technically running the engine without oil for like 3 seconds. /shrug

      EPilot, very true statement. I think the housing is something like 90 bucks for a piece of injection molded plastic /boggle. I recommend using the socket, but there are alternatives available. I think the socket is like 8 bucks at Home Depot or Sears for those who do not have it.

      Thanks much for the FB, keep it coming.

      Fae

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    12. 12-28-2004 08:59 AM #12
      You can get the plastic cap for around $30, not $90. It's still a good idea to get the 36mm socket so you can torque it properly. The cap is only supposed to be torqued to 18 ft-lbs and can easily be broken if you torque it higher. I accidentally had mine set to 22 ft-lbs (from the drain plug) and over-torqued the cap. The cap rotated so far past where it was supposed to go that the cage that slides inside the filter hit the top of the filter housing and half of it broke off.

      Gary


    13. 12-28-2004 06:53 PM #13
      Just changed my oil today...Excellent write up! helped me a lot. The best I've seen so far...

    14. Member bahnbrennerg60's Avatar
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      12-29-2004 12:40 PM #14
      yeah that was a good DIY, pictures really helped. thanks!

    15. Member DubStyleVr6's Avatar
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      01-17-2005 02:47 PM #15
      Quote, originally posted by VgRt6 »
      Nice work Mike. It's about time someone put this together for the 12v.

      FYI, I'd recommend removing the drain plug in the filter housing to drain the housing before removing the cap. It makes the job significantly less messy. If you do this, barely a drop will spill when you remove the filter cap.

      I'm adding this to the DIY thread.

      Gary

      Very True


    16. 11-28-2005 10:26 AM #16
      what happens if you break the center guide piece? i dropped it and it broke off, but it was like 50 bucks to fix it, and i didnt wanna spend that money, so i just put it back on, and its been working fine. it broke but it still holds in place, but if i pull it then it will just come back out. is this a problem?

    17. Member JDriver1.8t's Avatar
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      11-28-2005 10:32 AM #17
      Great write up, but what's with the mesh top gloves?

    18. 11-28-2005 11:21 AM #18
      Quote, originally posted by JDriver1.8t »
      Great write up, but what's with the mesh top gloves?

      Leave him alone, the A-Team changed their oil on that van you know!!!!

      Also folks it's a good idea to block the rear tires for safety. Leave it in gear if manual and leave the jack there locked beside the stands. Safety first.


    19. 11-28-2005 03:59 PM #19
      whoa people still read that fuel filter diy? thanks for the props.

      Nice gloves and diy

      A


    20. 11-28-2005 05:23 PM #20
      Nice DIY, I worked at JiffyLube 2 years ago and hates these cause just cause how much of a mess taking the filter off was. This car is a piece of cake compared to a Lexus RX300. . .if someone asks, never do their oil!!!


    21. 11-28-2005 07:20 PM #21
      Where is everyone recycling their oil?

      I have a couple oil changes worth of dirty oil I need to get rid of.

      Oh, and I hand tighten the oil filter housing, and hand loosen it, I never have torqued it down with any type of tool. I have yet to get a leak.


    22. Member Halpem's Avatar
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      11-28-2005 08:09 PM #22
      Quote, originally posted by xanthus »
      Where is everyone recycling their oil?

      I have a couple oil changes worth of dirty oil I need to get rid of.

      In my area , the local Auto parts take the old oil for free.

      Transmission Repair and Parts - CalTrans - California Transmission Products - 714-953-9282
      VAG-COM Ross Tech Help - Need Your car Scan,
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    23. 11-28-2005 09:07 PM #23
      tips i have found:

      -don't use a screwdriver to remove the o-ring! buddy did it and end up gouging a nice lines through his threads....which began to leak.
      -for mk3 if your drain bolt came with the plastic washer upgrade to the copper one off the MK4. no more drip leaks
      -have the front slightly higher than the rear. pan drains to the rear and speeds up the process.

      My Legen...wait for it....dairy VRT build thread http://forums.vwvortex.com/showthread.php?3571869

    24. Member jaysvw's Avatar
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      11-29-2005 01:23 AM #24
      Here is the updated link to that VW .pdf file in the begining.

      http://www.vw.com/vwcom/conten...t.pdf


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      12-09-2005 07:32 PM #25

      Thanks man, DIY updated to reflect new PDF.

      Seriously, if you're not rockin mesh gloves to do your work, BA Barracus pity the foo!!

      Mike

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    26. Member Soren's Avatar
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      12-09-2005 09:53 PM #26
      Wow, fuel filter every 2 oil changes? Seems a bit excessive. I change it every 24k and feel like that's overkill... do you have ****ty gas in your area or something?

      Only other things I would do differently is open the filler cap before draining anything because it flows faster and use the drain on the filter housing. 2-3 extra mins for a clean job even if I fumble and drop the housing is worth it to me..

      Nice DIY though. I can't believe people pay other people to do their oil changes. Thats just silly. And lazy.


    27. 07-16-2007 12:35 AM #27
      do you burn with 5w-30?

    28. Member
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      07-16-2007 12:49 AM #28
      I have since switched to using Mobil 1 - 0w40, but regardless, I never burned a drop of oil with this 12v engine.

      Mike

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    29. 07-21-2007 02:40 PM #29
      does using a thicker blend help with that lifter tick?

    30. Member
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      07-21-2007 03:06 PM #30
      It might help a little...

      Mike

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    31. 07-21-2007 07:17 PM #31
      nice write up

    32. Member wabbitGTl's Avatar
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      07-22-2007 11:35 PM #32
      i did mine awhile ago in my mk3 for the first time so i was in the dark a bit. one thing i noticed different was that my owner's manual dictated 7.4 quarts. what's the deal?
      Quote Originally Posted by chucchinchilla View Post
      People spec their Porsche cars like they select bottles of wine when going on a date. Few people want to be the guy buying the cheapest bottle on the menu. The rest, like myself, realize they'll be just as happy (and just as laid) buying the cheapest. Garcon, one base Carrera for me please.

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      07-23-2007 11:20 AM #33
      i see you did the leather glove "swiss cheese" mod. props

    34. Member VR6ix's Avatar
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      07-23-2007 04:36 PM #34
      Avoid the channel locks at all costs. You WILL end-up marring, scarring and chewing the soft black plastic.


      Instead, try using a pipe wrench (okay, not that big) if you're stuck with hand-tools and an over-tightened cartridge case..


      What's the difference? you say.

      Channel locks will never give you a perfectly parallel surface between the two jaws when you clamp onto the 36mm plastic nut. As a result it is very easy to have the channel-lock jaws slip off the plastic, either gouging or scraping and eventually rounding-off the plastic nut shape.

      A pipe wrench still uses aggressive teeth on the jaws, but, most importantly, they are infinitely adjustable and the mechanism that allows one jaw to pivot also allows you to get both jaws parallel on the plastic nut surfaces. Much less chance of slipping (still possible tho), much better surface grip to apply torque, your plastic cap will last longer. You'll also find out quickly that the pivoting jaw means the pipe-wrench will only work in one direction.


      And while the manual may say "7.4 quarts" or whatever, that is the total capacity of the oil system, which includes the factory oil cooler. When you drain the pan and the filter, you don't get all the old oil out completely. I can usually get 5.5L ~ 5.75L in during a change, which is one large 5L jug and part of a single 1L, which later goes in the trunk "just in case".


      Modified by VR6ix sippin' sailor jerry


      Modified by VR6ix at 6:37 PM 7-30-2008

      · ·we're only gonna die for our own arrogance that's why we might as well take our time...
      · · /
      · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · On a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to Ø

    35. Member
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      07-23-2007 07:17 PM #35
      Quote, originally posted by VR6ix »
      Avoid the channel locks at all costs. You WILL end-up marring, scarring and chewing the soft black plastic.

      I agree with you 100%. I actually use a 6 sided 36mm socket to remove the filter housing. The intent of this procedure was written to allow anyone with "normal" tools to do their own oil change. Everyone should have a pair of channel locks in their toolbox.

      Mike

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