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    Thread: FAQ

    1. Moderator yellowslc's Avatar
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      03-01-2005 11:02 AM #1
      Please post all FAQ items here.

      Robert



    2. Member DHill's Avatar
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      03-02-2005 09:57 AM #3
      Glad this is up. Thanks, yellowslc.

      FOR OBVIOUS REASONS:

      PLEASE POST NEW QUESTIONS AS A NEW THREAD IN THE FORUM.

      THANKS!


      I forgot the G60 Group in the original post, but Les pointed that out.

      Yahoo G60 Syncro Group - probably the best syncro group in Yahoo.
      http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/syncrog60/

      Other links I've found
      http://www.syncro.org/

      http://www.geocities.com/gkurk...2.htm

      http://www.syncro.ca/

      http://www.audiforum.nl/Techni....html

      http://www.faltdach.net/vwgolfrallye.htm

      http://www.vw-golf.com.cn/history.htm

      http://www.ukcar.com/features/...s.htm


      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1848903

      ------------------------------------------------------------------------




      Modified by DHill at 10:45 AM 7-5-2005


    3. Member DHill's Avatar
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      03-02-2005 10:07 AM #4

      Best way to get Syncro parts (if you are in the 'States)

      Find a helpful seller in Canada who is parting out a Passat G60 Syncro. Have them ship the parts to you. You will need to find a carrier, have the parts shipped, and it is likely that you will not be there to clear the items at the border so you will have to ship the items "in bond to destination". These are the 4 magic words. Remember, "in bond to destination"!!

      What this means is that the items will arrive at the shipping hub near you, and you will then have to take documents to your nearest Customs office and pay the fees.

      -For used auto parts like transmissions and rear axles, fees should be about 2.5% of the selling cost - fees are significantly different for new auto parts!
      - Shipping a 4'x5' pallet full of Syncro goodies (transmission, rear axle with diff and all that, center propshaft, and front axles) will cost about $400 and the pallet should weigh about 400 lbs. or so. In most cases, using a service like freightquote.com will save you a lot of hassle. Just tell them that you have a pallet full of used auto parts, and that you want to ship them from Canada to the U.S., "IN BOND TO DESTINATION" ( ). Remember the magic words. Those 4 words will explain a lot and when you recite them, many problems go away.

      Now, once you get the parts, it's up to you to figure out what to do with them.



    4. Member DHill's Avatar
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      03-02-2005 10:10 AM #5
      Q: Can't I just import an entire car?

      A: Yes. However, shipping a car is totally different. If it is running, you have to prove that the car meets emissions and crash standards for the US, and if it does not meet these standards, it is your responsibility to get the conversion certified and completed! Shipping a slavage car is also a different ball game. Check out http://www.cbp.gov/ (the Customs Border and Protection home page) for more info.

      Also, if a car ships from a foreign country into the US, it cannot have any foreign soil on it. So you have to convince the seller to get it steam cleaned for you.


    5. Member DHill's Avatar
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      03-02-2005 10:23 AM #6
      Q: Can I put syncro on a mk2?

      A: Yes. (Those more experienced than me should chime in). Bare essentials:

      1. G60 syncro transmission
      2. Center propshaft
      3. Rear end (includes viscous coupling and differential, rear axles, swing arms, hubs)
      4. Syncro down pipe and twin catalytic converters

      Things to consider - for the non-Rallye mk2, you will also have to widen the center tunnel to accomodate the propshaft and exhaust. Then, you will have to adapt the rear floor pan and gas tank, since the non-syncro car has a spacious spare tire well and different gas tank. If you want it to look stock, you will need a syncro gas tank and floor pan. Otherwise, many people have welded in a steel plate and used a fuel cell. Whatever floats your boat!

      Also, if you are using Passat parts, you will have to adapt the length of the center propshaft to fit your mk2.

      Q: Can I convert my Mk3 to Syncro?

      A: Yes. The rear end "bolts right up" with the appropriate brackets. For VR6 cars, you will need to get ahold of a VR6 syncro transmission bellhousing, and then you can mate the G60 syncro trans to your VR. MMm, syncro VR. For non-VR6 equipped cars, it is my understanding that the 02C Syncro trans from the G60 Passat bolts up to any other 4 cylinder engine without hassle, including the 1.8T (can you verify this, Les?). Makes for a recipe of fun Syncro cars... think about the options. TDI, 16v, 16v T, 8vT, 2.0 8v, 1.8 8v, 1.8T, etc etc etc mmmm it makes me hungry.

      So, you'll need:

      1. G60 Syncro Transmission
      2. VR6 Syncro Transmission bellhousing
      3. Center propshaft
      4. Rear end (as before... includes VC, rear diff, axles, swingarms, etc. )
      5. VR6 syncro downpipe and twin cats

      Again, the rear floor pan needs to be modified. You can chop up stock Syncro parts and make them fit, or customize your ride with a steel plate and fuel cell.

      Also, if you use Passat parts, you will have to change the length of the center propshaft.

      Q: What do I do about my suspension?

      A: A lot of people use Rallye mk2/mk3 coilovers with adjustable dampening and height. For Passat people, they can obviously use the Passat springs/shocks, though on the mk2 and mk3, it is my understanding that the Passat units will make the rear end sit kind of high. With the coils, you can adjust your ride height and make up for that.

      If I have forgotten anything or made any errors, please correct me!





      Modified by DHill at 10:48 AM 5-19-2005


    6. Member DHill's Avatar
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      03-02-2005 10:31 AM #7
      Q: Is the Syncro system a full time AWD system?

      A: Technically: Yes. In reality: No. There is always a little bit of power going to the rear wheels, but the viscous coupling is designed to operate when there is wheel slip. With an open differential in the front, if one of the wheels loses traction, the slipping wheel will spin faster than the one with traction (think about the last time you were stuck in the snow). With Syncro, the propshaft then begins to spin quickly. The fluid in the VC begins to churn, and the clutch plates in the VC turn as a consequence, and the rear wheels will begin to spin. Therefore, the system is designed to combat wheel slip. Works well in the snow, but it is not optimum for, say, a track car. In that case, one might want something that is constantly distributing power between all four wheels at all times, like Quattro.

      Again, anyone can add more or correct me if I am wrong!


    7. 03-02-2005 12:35 PM #8
      On an original Mk2 G60 (european car) there's no need to fit the wider center tunnel, as it already has the wide one. The Mk2 G60 also has wider front track (A2 plus) and stiffer stabilizers.

    8. Member swingwing205's Avatar
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      03-03-2005 05:13 PM #9
      Quote, originally posted by DHill »
      Q: Can I put syncro on a mk2?

      A: Yes. (Those more experienced than me should chime in). Bare essentials:

      1. G60 syncro transmission
      2. Center propshaft
      3. Rear end (includes viscous coupling and differential, rear axles, swing arms, hubs)
      4. Syncro down pipe and twin catalytic converters

      Things to consider - for the non-Rallye mk2, you will also have to widen the center tunnel to accomodate the propshaft and exhaust. Then, you will have to adapt the rear floor pan and gas tank, since the non-syncro car has a spacious spare tire well and different gas tank. If you want it to look stock, you will need a syncro gas tank and floor pan. Otherwise, many people have welded in a steel plate and used a fuel cell. Whatever floats your boat!

      Also, if you are using Passat parts, you will have to adapt the length of the center propshaft to fit your mk2.


      You can use the Corrado centre tunnel (or undertunnel as I've also heard it called, and that's my word for it) instead of the MKII Syncro one to have enough room to run the propshaft and Syncro exhaust.
      Props to Dutchdub (Marcel DeVries) for this one!

      BTW, the Passat Syncro propshaft is different in length ONLY because the front and rear segments are slightly longer to accomodate the Passat wheelbase stretch. I wish I have pics, but the center prop seg is exactly the same length as the MKII Rallye/G60Syncro one. HOWEVER, most MKII conversions using Passat Syncro propshafts are done by shortening the length of the center segment. As long as the propshaft is re-balanced, there should be no probs with vibration.

      The B3 Passat rear crossmember (and I assume the A3 version as well, although not for sure about that one) can be used to make the connection from the body to the rear diff. Simply bolt this unit it after carefully aligning the rear suspension, and run the bolt thru the rubber bushing into the rear diff suspesion adaptor.

      Pics will be coming on this.....


    9. Member DHill's Avatar
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      03-09-2005 08:11 PM #10
      Syncro related threads:

      From Les:

      My Red Wagon Project
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=711295

      pg1syncro's yellow wagon
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1637362

      pg1syncro's blue sedan
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1476951


      A twin cat question I had once
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1675320

      General Syncro questions I asked to the folks up North
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1423422

      more of my dumb questions about VR6 syncro options
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1434256


      How to fit a syncro drivetrain (with engine) into a VW Golf (and insight into the system) [Archived]
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zer...age=1

      Because owning one car with quattro isn't enough... [Archived]
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1801684





      Modified by DHill at 11:22 AM 4-5-2005


    10. Member DHill's Avatar
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      03-18-2005 10:42 AM #11
      Q: Is the Syncro in the transporter the same as the Syncro in the Golf Rallye, G60 Passat Syncro, and mk3 Golf Syncro?

      Nope. The syncro system in the Transporter also uses a viscous coupling, but the drive power is biased to the rear and in the event of wheel slip, power goes to the front wheels. The transmission is a longintudinal design rather than a transverse design like the FWD platforms of the Rallye, Passat, and mk3.

      Engine in the Transporter is mounted in the rear.


      Modified by DHill at 10:27 AM 10-25-2008


    11. Member DHill's Avatar
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      04-05-2005 11:20 AM #12
      Q: What is the difference between Syncro and 4Motion?

      A:

      Go here: http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1848903

      Summary:

      Syncro is primarily for transverse engine vehicles. Open front diff, viscous coupling center differential mounted on the rear differential housing, and an open rear. Part time automatically engaging via mechanical operation of viscous coupling.

      4Motion can be transverse or longitudinal. The transverse is in the Golf an Audi TT versions, which is similar to Syncro but with an actively controlled viscous coupling (i.e. Haldex). The longitudinal 4Motion is nothing more than the Audi Quattro drivetrain found in the Audi A4. The Passat has been virtually the same chassis as the Audi A4 and the drivetrain is the same. New Passats are now transverse.

      Quattro (and longitudinal 4Motion) uses open front, Torsen center, and open rear with EDL. Fully automatic.
      Torsen is a permanent 50/50 split, but can send up to 75% to one wheel.
      Syncro is always primarily front drive, and power to the rears when there is a difference in wheel speed between front and rear.

      4Motion in longitudinal engined cars uses the same technology as quattro; transverse 4Motion cars use the Haldex system. (courtesy of Brillo9)


      Actually, there are two flavors of Syncro. The one used in the Quantum has three open diffs, with the center & rear lockable.
      Vanagons have a viscous center diff & optional rear locker. (courtesy of vanaguy)

      Have to clarify, but I believe the Quantum had a longitudinal layout, thus giving Syncro both longitudinal and transverse engines.




      Modified by DHill at 10:36 AM 10-25-2008


    12. Member DHill's Avatar
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      04-08-2005 12:52 PM #13
      Things to add about Quattro

      Quote, originally posted by dtompsett »
      Quattro has several versions.... quattro I (open front, lockable center and rear), quattro II (open front, torsen center, lockable rear; rear auto-disengages at 15mph/ 25km/h), quattro III(open front, electronic locking torsen center, torsen rear), quattro IV (open front with EDL, torsen center, open rear with EDL)

      Doug.

      And a link about Skoda's Octavia AWD and its relationship to Quattro: http://www.daniil.dds.nl/skoda/vag-4wd-types.html


    13. Member DHill's Avatar
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      04-08-2005 01:35 PM #14
      Q: I want a more active all wheel drive system. How can I put this on my car?


      A:
      For most mk2/mk3 folks, the Syncro system is the closest thing to "bolt-in" (ha ha) AWD performance. However, thanks to Haldex, the OEM supplier for a variable-pressure viscous coupling power transfer device, VW's 4Motion offers the ability to have a more active all wheel drive system while still using the transverse-mounted engine, transaxle split to 4wd architecture. in simplest terms (and therefore somewhat incomplete terms), the Haldex system works on a similar principle to the viscous coupling in Syncro, but an electronically controlled solenoid varies pressure on the viscous fluid in the coupler, therefore varying the amount of power transfer - effectively allowing for continuous power distribution to the rear wheels. In the US, the R32 and the Audi TT 3.2 both use this type of drivetrain connected to the 3.2 L 24v VR6, a damn sexy engine if I might add. to do this conversion, one needs an 02M or 02Q gearbox, as discussed in the Syncro-->Haldex conversion kit thread below. By matching the correct transmission to rear end, the gearing will match and one can have a mk2 or mk3 that's ready to put down power to all 4 wheels, all the time. Mmmmm yes.

      My Q&A thread about VC alternatives: http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1812800

      Marcel's Syncro-->Haldex Conversion Services/Kits: http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1891426

      YellowSLC is probably one of the first to do this on a Corrado, with Marcel's help and the envious eyes of all of us watching.

      Q: Can I somehow use a Torsen diff as a replacement for the VC?

      Ummm... no, because Torsen is for a longitudinal engine layout, but the Syncro VC is for a transverse engine layout. The two are much too different mechanically for a direct swap.

      I you want Torsen, consider shoving a complete longitudinally-mounted Quattro drivetrain into your mk2/mk3. That's the shortest route if you really have an itch for Torsen.

      Below summarizes my irrelevant analysis of the equivalent of putting a square peg in a round hole. This was when I was just barely beginning to grasp the difference between the mechanical operation of a longitudinal and transverse engine drivetrain. Read it if you want... but it will probably just confuse you. I'm leaving it here just to say "Yep, this has been considered and is irrelevant, for the record."

      Quote, originally posted by DHill »
      A Quick Summary of the VC Alternatives Discussed So Far

      Torsen

      In the picture of the Torsen diff you see that it has one input and two outputs. The input is the outer ring gear, and the output is the two shafts. In a FWD situation, the power goes from the ring gear to the two shafts, and the majority of torque transfer goes to the shaft with the most resistance.

      There needs to be some sort of interface between the center driveshaft and the rear end, as there is a difference in wheel speeds during turning/cornering and in wheel slip situations. The VC serves this purpose, but for a more active rear end in cornering situations, the VC is not as much of a performers as say, Quattro with its Torsen center diff.

      Now, the following text is supposed to serve two purposes: 1. I am trying to mentally work through this problem, and I'm typing as I go. 2. I am hoping that someone can either verify or reclarify whatever conclusions I make... I really want to find the best answer.

      Previously, we were discussing the possibility of using the Torsen diff as this interface between front and rear. This would involve connecting the center driveshaft to one output shaft of the Torsen, and the other output shaft to the rear end, and meanwhile the ring gear is unloaded (spinning freely). The hope would be that the Torsen would distribute torque between front and rear, allowing for the optimum amount of traction.

      However, the Torsen operates on the mathematical basis that T(in)=T(out), where T is torque. More specifically

      T(in_ring gear) = T(shaft_1) + T(shaft_2) + losses

      The "losses" term is from friction and heat, and it can't be reliably quatified at this point, and it is not essential to this argument for the time being. In fact, it is this "losses" term that makes the Torsen a better limited slip device than an open diff, but that's for another time.

      If the Torsen were to be used in the way being discussed (as a VC alternative), then T(in_ring gear) = 0. If we neglect the losses, we find

      T(shaft_1) = - T(shaft_2)

      i.e., the Torsen is balancing torque between the two shafts. This is similar to the case in Torsen-equipped FWD car that is coasting. The outer ring gear spins freely while the tires spin. If one coasts through a turn, there is a difference in wheel speeds. The faster spinning wheel will cause a shift in the torque toward the slower wheel.

      What does this mean? Well, at first I thought it meant that I could drop this in for my VC and achieve a mechanically-based system for active torque biasing. Nope. As 94volkswagen said, he jacked up his Dad's Audi V8 Quattro, turned one back wheel and the other spun backward. That's what the minus sign means. So, if you want active AWD without a total reconfiguration of your drivetrain, Haldex is the way to go.

      Q: Well, if I can't use Torsen, then I'm screwed.

      A: Wait! There's always Haldex!

      Quote, originally posted by DHill »

      Haldex

      For many of us, we are looking at a VR6 powerplant in a Corrado, Mk2, or Mk3. This makes the R32 6 speed O2M transmission a "bolt-in" affair. As we've seen in yellowslc's project, one can adapt the Syncro rear end to accomodate the rear end that comes with 4Motion cars. The Audi TT also comes with 1.8T and 3.2 VR6 options (both transverse mounted), and both of those use an 02M transmission, so the 02M is a perfect candidate for anyone who wants to put in a beefier 6 speed and have active all wheel drive.

      Threfore, for those of us with AWD VR6 aspirations, making an approximation of the R32 driveline is not all that inconceivable. By using the O2M transmission and the Haldex rear end, all of the gearing is matched, the parts are OEM, and the driveline is stout.

      There are two difficult parts to the conversion. First, one needs to adapt the Syncro rear end to fit the 4Motion pieces. One can try this on their own, or tap into the resources found here: http://www.dutchdub.com (Marcel's conversion kit)

      The second difficult part is tapping into the Haldex electronically controlled wet multi-plate clutch. The Haldex clutch pack is similar to the VC in Syncro, except solenoids can vary pressure on the plates, therefore controlling the amount of power distributed to the rear. Theoretically, one can replace the stock Haldex controller with what is essentially a driver-selectable rear wheel bias.

      Yes, I think that sounds fun too.

      Stay tuned for ways to control the Haldex solenoid and therefore the bias between front and rear.


      Note: (October 2008) The Haldex conversion has been done with standalone control. Making that standalone controller has been a big secret, or nobody knows how to convey how it is done. This is the biggest hurdle to using Haldex.


      Modified by DHill at 10:47 AM 10-25-2008


    14. Member DHill's Avatar
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      04-08-2005 02:14 PM #15
      Types of Differentials

      Open Differentials


      The most common type of differential found on cars and trucks are known as Open Differentials. An open differential always applies the same amount of torque to each wheel. There are two factors that determine how much torque can be applied to the wheels: equipment and traction. In dry conditions, when there is plenty of traction, the amount of torque applied to the wheels is limited by the engine and gearing; in a low traction situation, such as when driving on ice, the amount of torque is limited to the greatest amount that will not cause a wheel to slip under those conditions. So, even though a car may be able to produce more torque, there needs to be enough traction to transmit that torque to the ground. If you give the car more gas after the wheels start to slip, the wheels will just spin faster. If you've ever driven on ice, you may know of a trick that makes acceleration easier: If you start out in second gear, or even third gear, instead of first, because of the gearing in the transmission you will have less torque available to the wheels. This will make it easier to accelerate without spinning the wheels.

      Now what happens if one of the drive wheels has good traction, and the other one is on ice? This is where the problem with open differentials comes in. Remember that the open differential always applies the same torque to both wheels, and the maximum amount of torque is limited to the greatest amount that will not make the wheels slip. It doesn't take much torque to make a tire slip on ice. And when the wheel with good traction is only getting the very small amount of torque that can be applied to the wheel with less traction, your car isn't going to move very much.

      Another time open differentials might get you into trouble is when you are driving off-road. If you have a four-wheel drive truck, or an SUV, with an open differential on both the front and the back, you could get stuck. If one of the front tires and one of the back tires comes off the ground, they will just spin helplessly in the air, and you won't be able to move at all.


      Limited Slip Differentials


      A Limited Slip Differential (also known as a LSD) attempts to address the problems of an Open Differential. A Limited Slip Differential is very similar to an Open Differential, but it adds a spring pack and a set of clutches. Some of these have a cone clutch that is similar to the synchronizers in a manual transmission. The spring pack pushes the side gears against the clutches, which are attached to the cage. Both side gears spin with the cage when both wheels are moving at the same speed, and the clutches aren't really needed - the only time the clutches step in is when something happens to make one wheel spin faster than the other, as in a turn. The clutches fight this behavior, wanting both wheels to go the same speed. If one wheel wants to spin faster than the other, it must first overpower the clutch. The stiffness of the springs combined with the friction of the clutch determine how much torque it takes to overpower it.

      Therefore, in the situation where one drive wheel is on the ice and the other one has good traction, With this limited slip differential, even though the wheel on the ice is not able to transmit much torque to the ground, the other wheel will still get the torque it needs to move. The torque supplied to the wheel not on the ice is equal to the amount of torque it takes to overpower the clutches. The result is that you can move forward, although still not with the full power of your car. This is why Limited Slip Differentials are popular in Drag Racing - they minimize wasteful wheel spin on a hard launch.


      Locking Differentials


      The locking differential is useful for serious off-road vehicles and for drag racing. This type of differential has the same parts as an open differential, but adds an electric, pneumatic or hydraulic mechanism to lock the two output pinions together. This mechanism is usually activated manually by switch, and when activated, both wheels will spin at the same speed. If one wheel ends up off the ground, the other wheel won't know or care. Both wheels will continue to spin at the same speed as if nothing had changed. This maximizes the amount of forward motion, irregardless of wheel slippage - perfect for drag racing.

      There are several types of locking differentials. An ARB Air Locker is a unique differential because it acts like an open differential until an on-board air compressor is activated by a switch. The air pressure is used to lock the differential. This allows a very high breakaway torque for racing but no compromises for daily driving.

      A Detroit Locker, popular on muscle cars and some off-road trucks, is a ratcheting type of locking differential. It is very strong and will almost always provide equal torque application to each axle, but it is noticeable when cornering.

      Finally there is the spool, which solidly connects the left and right axles with no slipping allowed. It is used for drag-racing applications only, since it maximizes forward acceleration, but makes the vehicle very difficult to turn and is very hard on the axles.


      Torsen Differentials


      The Torsen differential is a purely mechanical device; it has no electronics, clutches or viscous fluids. The Torsen (from Torque Sensing) works as an open differential when the amount of torque going to each wheel is equal. As soon as one wheel starts to lose traction, the difference in torque causes the gears in the Torsen differential to bind together. The design of the gears in the differential determines the torque bias ratio. For instance, if a particular Torsen differential is designed with a 5:1 bias ratio, it is capable of applying up to five times more torque to the wheel that has good traction.

      These devices are often used in high-performance all-wheel-drive vehicles. Like the viscous coupling, they are often used to transfer power between the front and rear wheels. In this application, the Torsen is superior to the viscous coupling because it transfers torque to the stable wheels before the actual slipping occurs.

      However, if one set of wheels loses traction completely, the Torsen differential will be unable to supply any torque to the other set of wheels. The bias ratio determines how much torque can be transferred, and five times zero is zero. One novel solution is to apply the brakes and the gas at the same time. This will create a level of "traction" on the spining wheel, and allow the Torsen differential to shift power to the other wheel.


      Vicious Coupling Differentials


      The viscous coupling is often found in all-wheel-drive vehicles. It is commonly used to link the back wheels to the front wheels so that when one set of wheels starts to slip, torque will be transferred to the other set.

      The viscous coupling has two sets of plates inside a sealed housing that is filled with a thick fluid, as shown in below. One set of plates is connected to each output shaft. Under normal conditions, both sets of plates and the viscous fluid spin at the same speed. When one set of wheels tries to spin faster, perhaps because it is slipping, the set of plates corresponding to those wheels spins faster than the other. The viscous fluid, stuck between the plates, tries to catch up with the faster disks, dragging the slower disks along. This transfers more torque to the slower moving wheels -- the wheels that are not slipping. The faster the plates are spinning relative to each other, the more torque the viscous coupling transfers. The coupling does not interfere with turns because the amount of torque transferred during a turn is so small. However, this also highlights a disadvantage of the viscous coupling: No torque transfer will occur until a wheel actually starts slipping.


      Positraction Differentials


      A positraction differential is a special traction differential. Its purpose is to improve the way your differential performs under adverse conditions. When one wheel starts to slip, these differentials transfer the torque to the wheel that is not slipping. The car can then continue to go forward. There are several different kinds of positraction differentials, but all of them are based on a friction device to provide resistance to normal differential operation.

      A positraction differential provides better traction, which is handy when roads are slippery. It also lends itself to fast acceleration.

      One type uses four differential pinions instead of two, with two pinion shafts. It also uses a series of four clutch discs. The differential pinions run into resistance when they try to turn the axle side gears. The resistance gets transferred to the pinion shafts driving the pinions. The shafts are forced to slide up little ramps. This action moves both shafts outward. The pinions cause the clutches to lock.
      Other types use cone clutches, or disc clutches under pressure from coil springs. By restricting the differential action, torque is delivered to the slipping wheel.


    15. Member DHill's Avatar
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      05-03-2005 09:43 AM #16
      Diagrams from Les. I will eventually host these on my own server for backup, but these are informative for the person who is looking for these things.




    16. Member maximusvad's Avatar
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      05-09-2005 11:11 AM #17
      What do I need for a MKII VR6 AWD ?
      HOW HARD IS IT TO PUT PICTURES AND LOCATION IN YOUR FOR SALE THREAD
      If you want your money back for your parts then sell the parts, otherwise sell your car at book value or below... Stock > modded...less chance you screwed the thing up. Your Mk II isn't rare.

    17. Member DHill's Avatar
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      05-11-2005 08:38 AM #18
      Quote, originally posted by maximusvad »
      What do I need for a MKII VR6 AWD ?

      Please, take a moment to read the posts above and you will find a series of answers to this question, as I wrote it there a while back.

      In summary, you must get the necessary items to convert your mk2 to Syncro, in addition to a VR6 bellhousing for the 02C transmission (if you have acquired an 02C transmission from a G60). To put the VR6 in your mk2, you will need a host of other items from a VR6 donor car, such as the subframe, radiator fans (double fan, I think), etc. You will find that if you search the topic "VR6 swap" in the mk2 or Hybrid forums, you will discover a wealth of information. You are looking at two donor vehicles.... the first is a VR6 donor (say a rear ended B4 Passat, for example) and the other is a Syncro donor car (perhaps a B3 Passat G60 Syncro from Canada).

      If you have any other questions that are not answered in this thread, please post new questions in the Syncro/4Motion/Quattro Forum and someone can provide answers for you there, as this thread is designed to be a "handbook" of sorts.


      Modified by DHill at 10:46 AM 7-5-2005


    18. Member efritsch's Avatar
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      05-19-2005 05:21 PM #19
      Quote, originally posted by dtompsett »
      Quattro has several versions.... quattro I (open front, lockable center and rear), quattro II (open front, torsen center, lockable rear; rear auto-disengages at 15mph/ 25km/h), quattro III(open front, electronic locking torsen center, torsen rear), quattro IV (open front with EDL, torsen center, open rear with EDL)

      What version is an 87 4000?

      Quote Originally Posted by 90quattrocoupe
      I am old enough that I only have to be nice when I want to.

    19. 05-28-2005 10:20 PM #20
      Quote, originally posted by yellowslc »
      Yahoo Groups

      Mk2 Golf Country Syncro Yahoo Group:

      http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/golfcountry/


    20. 05-28-2005 10:22 PM #21
      Quote, originally posted by yellowslc »
      Other Resources

      The VW Golf Rallye G60 Register:
      http://vzone.virgin.net/paul.roberts32/


    21. Member Drehkraft's Avatar
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      06-19-2005 08:23 PM #22
      Quote, originally posted by DHill »

      Q: Can I convert my Mk3 to Syncro?

      A: Yes. The rear end "bolts right up" with the appropriate brackets.

      What brackets does one need? I have both a 94 Golf and 92 B3 Syncro wagon. I have considered putting the 1.8T into the Golf with the syncro swap.

      Cheap, fast, reliable - Pick your two!

    22. Member DHill's Avatar
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      06-29-2005 10:20 PM #23
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2060883

      Quattro Longitudinal Transmissions (for instance, in the B5/B5.5 chassis)

      5 Spd. Manual Transmission 01A All Wheel Drive (quattro)
      6 Spd. Manual Transmission 01E All Wheel Drive (quattro)
      5 Spd. Automatic Transmission 01L All Wheel Drive (quattro)



    23. Member kish53a's Avatar
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      06-29-2005 11:12 PM #24
      Quote, originally posted by DHill »

      Q: Can I convert my Mk3 to Syncro?

      A: Yes. The rear end "bolts right up" with the appropriate brackets



      I'm going to be spending a few months in Germany this summer, and if I find/afford the parts, what would I need to get? (aside from rear susp, prop shaft, fuel tank..yada..yada..yada)


    24. 06-30-2005 08:28 PM #25
      Quote, originally posted by kish53a »


      I'm going to be spending a few months in Germany this summer, and if I find/afford the parts, what would I need to get? (aside from rear susp, prop shaft, fuel tank..yada..yada..yada)

      This might give you an idea:







    25. Member DHill's Avatar
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      07-05-2005 10:41 AM #26
      Quote, originally posted by Samzik »
      q: Ok one question i didnt notice here is : can one put torsen diferential to 02M gearboks replacing front dif making it limited slip. Then use all the haldeks godies/parts to get the rear work. Then on rear, use audis lockable dif ? That would be ultimate funcar to drive in winter and slipy conditions! Cos fronts are driven by torsen and they always try to grasp the road, center is controlled by haldeks meaning 100%front/0% back to 50/50 max. And if needed the back dif can be locked for driving in ice or running 1/4 mile.
      I am told the torsen dif is to big and wount fit in haldeks gearboks is this true?

      [*******]PLEASE POST NEW QUESTIONS AS A THREAD IN THE SYNCRO/4MOTION/QUATTRO FORUM... IT KEEPS THE CLUTTER AWAY!![/size]


      Quaife makes an 02M limited slip. Bildon carries it, and a search on Google for "02M Quaife" will return a few hits.

      http://www.bildon.com/catalog/...Nav=5
      http://www.nolimitmotorsport.com/prod/10-309-195

      Peloquin makes one for the 02M as well.

      http://www.tyrolsport.com/vwperformance.htm
      http://shop.fixxtuning.com/s.n...42/.f

      Both of the above-mentioned LSDs are for the front in 4Motion 02M car like the R32.

      Google really is your friend.

      http://technikmotorsport.com/e...c8859

      http://www.evwparts.com/Mercha...pDiff





      Modified by DHill at 10:43 AM 7-5-2005


    26. Member DHill's Avatar
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      08-05-2005 01:32 PM #27

    27. Moderator yellowslc's Avatar
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      09-20-2005 11:43 AM #28
      Haldex Pinouts:

      T8 - Socket between car and control unit
      T8/1, Red = Ign.
      T8/2, Black = Gnd.
      T8/3, White = BLS (brake light switch)
      T8/4, Blue = HBLS (hand brake light switch)
      T8/5, Brown = K-line (diagnostics)
      T8/7, Blue/Grey = CAN low
      T8/8, Blue/Orange = CAN high

      T2 - Socket between control unit and feeder pump(pwm switched voltage)
      T2/1, Yellow = Pump 1
      T2/2, Yellow/Black = Pump 2


    28. Member DHill's Avatar
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      09-22-2005 03:49 AM #29
      Q: But I really really really really want Torsen. Can't I just swap in a Quattro drivetrain so I can do silly burnouts like the Dahlback Golf all day long? Can't I?

      A: Yes.... but be prepared to get to work. For a long time.

      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1170697


    29. 09-30-2005 10:02 AM #30
      Q: does anyone have the diff ratios of the audis and the syncros and also gear ratios?

    30. Member Sepp's Avatar
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      10-12-2005 06:53 PM #31
      Quote, originally posted by efritsch »

      What version is an 87 4000?


      Original quattro
      Stretched, poke, rubbed......sounds like a porn stars butt hole.

    31. Member Sepp's Avatar
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      10-12-2005 07:07 PM #32
      Quote, originally posted by Yellow_bunny »
      Q: does anyone have the diff ratios of the audis and the syncros and also gear ratios?

      Wow.
      Which Audi's?? (they made alot of them)

      On the ur quattro it was the following.

      pre-'84
      1st 3.6:1
      2nd 2.125:1
      3rd 1.360:1
      4th 0.967:1
      5th 0.778:1

      Some criticism was brought up on how far apart the gears were (if you drove the car you'd know)

      So in '84 they changed them to
      1st 3.6:1
      2nd 2.125:1
      3rd 1.458:1
      4th 1.071:1
      5th 0.778:1

      Diff ratios would be 1:1..right????

      Stretched, poke, rubbed......sounds like a porn stars butt hole.

    32. 11-15-2005 03:09 PM #33
      ok do u know the ratios of the syncro trannys?
      i took apart a torsion rear diff from an early 90's audi v8 and the diff ratio is 4.11:1
      does anyone have the ratio of the syncro rear diff?

    33. Member 1.8TsyncroB3's Avatar
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      11-16-2005 09:21 AM #34
      All 4 cyl Golf/Jetta/Passat syncros have a 20/21 & a 21/20 tooth count on the angle drive and the rear diff. This effectively gives a 1:1 ratio through the system since one gearset cancels out the other. The rear diff on it's own gives a reduction of 1.05:1

      On VR6 syncros, the tooth count is 21/16 for the angle drive & 16/21 for the rear diff, which is a 1.31:1 ratio.

      Haldex systems are 27/17 & 17/27, giving a 1.59:1 ratrio per set.


    34. 11-16-2005 09:37 PM #35
      Quote, originally posted by 1.8TsyncroB3 »
      All 4 cyl Golf/Jetta/Passat syncros have a 20/21 & a 21/20 .....


      Just a little note, the early B5 Passat's AWD were called SYNCRO in Europe

      But true all the A2/A3 style (like the B3/B4's are) syncro's are share the two mentioned versions.


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