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    Thread: Which spark plug is best for the 1.8t? - Poll

    1. Member smd3's Avatar
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      07-05-2003 03:49 PM #26
      autolite copper's should be on the list. They run perfect in my car! $1.07 each.. gapped at .028.
      no misfires, no burnt out coil's.

    2. 07-05-2003 10:32 PM #27
      just picked up the ngk bkr7e's...theyre copper and one heat range colder than stock..cost me around 15 bucks at foreign autopart, i have 44k on the car, never changed plugs, decided it was time, cuz performance is lacking and gas mileage is aweful

    3. 07-06-2003 03:56 AM #28
      Quote, originally posted by UMDKappy »
      just picked up the ngk bkr7e's...theyre copper and one heat range colder than stock..cost me around 15 bucks at foreign autopart, i have 44k on the car, never changed plugs, decided it was time, cuz performance is lacking and gas mileage is aweful

      That's where my confusion lies. If someone can clear this up. From what I recall reading and hearing....
      BKR6E is ONE heat range colder than stock
      BKR7E is TWO heat range colder than stock.
      Can someone confirm this? I have the 6E's in my car at the moment and all is well.

    4. 07-06-2003 10:49 AM #29
      The 1.8T FAQ has a plug write up as well, which covers a lot of this material.
      For the record, the NGK BKR7E is one (1) heat range colder. The 6E is two ranges colder, the 5E is three ranges, and so on...

    5. 07-06-2003 03:17 PM #30
      Hi everybody,
      As you can tell, I don't post too often - but I thought I might be useful on this issue. I work in the engineering department for a sparkplug company (one of the BIGGIES) on the production side of the business.
      If there is one or two burning technical questions you guys wanted answered, I could take them to the guys in product engineering to get them answered. Everybody LOVES cars where I work - believe me. I'm always up for learning more myself - so fire away...

    6. 07-07-2003 06:05 PM #31
      Is copper better than platinum?
      A
      cheers Rex!!

    7. 07-07-2003 06:54 PM #32
      Quote, originally posted by TUR-80 »
      IF PLATINUM PLUGS ARE SO BAD, WHY DO VW AND AUDI FIT THEM AS STANDARD TO OUR CARS?

      As pointed out platinum works for long plug life, but not best performance. VW needs the long plug life to sell people cars now since you can buy a malibu that will go for 100K miles before a "tune up". Yes in general the factory does know more then the average vortex member, however there goal is not performance, while 99% of the people here alooking for plugs, it is.

    8. 07-08-2003 04:24 PM #33
      From NGK specs 2=Hot, 11= Cold
      From this 7E is one range colder, 6E is stock, 5E is 1 heat range hotter
      Specs are here>>>http://www.sparkplugs.com/images/ngksparkplug.jpg
      Quote, originally posted by GTI-Turbo »
      The 1.8T FAQ has a plug write up as well, which covers a lot of this material.
      For the record, the NGK BKR7E is one (1) heat range colder. The 6E is two ranges colder, the 5E is three ranges, and so on...

    9. 07-08-2003 05:36 PM #34
      note also, ik20s are stock heat range, ik22s are a range colder

    10. Member
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      07-08-2003 06:43 PM #35
      Quote »
      Is copper better than platinum?

      Copper is better for a high output engine because of the larger electrode (can remove comb. chamber heat at a faster rate than a "thin wire" platinum plug).
      Bosch F5DPOR Platins are better than copper plugs, but most people are a little alarmed at paying $100 for a set of plugs.

    11. 07-09-2003 10:10 PM #36
      [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

    12. Member boraIV's Avatar
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      07-14-2003 04:54 PM #37
      so for those of you running ngk bkr7e-11, what do you have them gapped at? [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

    13. Banned
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      07-14-2003 06:11 PM #38
      Besides the personal prefernce, which spark-plugs should I use (GIAC X-chipped car) with my car? Since it's chipped, ya know...
      I'm also located in hot climate

    14. 07-14-2003 08:48 PM #39
      I guess chipping has to be included in this, and if more than chipping is used.
      If its stock just keep using stock plugs, but what happens when you add a little more boost than VW was contemplating? will a one range cooler plug be better always? on what ocassions will it be better or worst? at what boost levels should you go 2 range colder etc....
      This is a complicated topic as all of these have to be adressed, maybe not necessarilly going into brands, but saying what materials and what heat ranges and then each can go out and buy whatever brand fulfills this.

    15. 07-15-2003 02:36 PM #40
      Bump as I've been wondering the exact same thing. Going to do plugs soon I'm thinking as I'm at 17,000 miles, and contemplating the Denso Iridiums. Did some homework on http://www.sparkplugs.com so I'm not totally dumb but I don't know if I should go w/20's or 22's a range colder. I am chipped and plan on TB exhaust in the future, maybe an intercooler, etc etc (where does it really end ). But alas I cant' do a phatty turbo setup.
      So with a KO3 sport/Revo 4bar chipped blah blah blah should I go a range colder??
      THANKS

      Quote, originally posted by Giancarlo »
      I guess chipping has to be included in this, and if more than chipping is used.
      If its stock just keep using stock plugs, but what happens when you add a little more boost than VW was contemplating? will a one range cooler plug be better always? on what ocassions will it be better or worst? at what boost levels should you go 2 range colder etc....
      This is a complicated topic as all of these have to be adressed, maybe not necessarilly going into brands, but saying what materials and what heat ranges and then each can go out and buy whatever brand fulfills this.

    16. Member boraIV's Avatar
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      07-15-2003 02:53 PM #41
      ok, but what should they be gapped at? heheh please, i want to do this today [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

    17. 07-15-2003 03:17 PM #42
      From the 1.8T Plug FAQ:
      *avoid BKR7E-11 as the factory gap is too large, .042*
      >> That is when they are gapped correctly (.028) the angle is to steep for a good burn. You want the BKR7E, not the BKR7E-11.
      Anyway, the gap for a one range colder plug is .028
      ======================================
      >FROM THE FAQ<
      Stock spark plugs NGK PFR6Q stock gap .032"
      --Common replacements
      Autolite 3923
      Autolite 3922 (one heat range colder)
      Denso Iridium IK20
      Denso Iridium IK22 (one heat range colder)
      Bosch F7LTCR
      NGK BKR7E (Race plug, one range colder)
      *avoid BKR7E-11 as the factory gap is too large, .042*
      For every additional 50HP over stock, a general rule is:
      --1 heat range colder
      --gap shrinks by .004
      So, a chipped 1.8T would make good use ofa plug one range colder gapped to .028
      Reference: From NGK's FAQ: Spark Plug Gap
      "Another consideration that should be taken into account is the extent of any modifications that you may have made to the engine. As an example, when you raise compression or add forced induction (a turbo system, nitrous or supercharger kit) you must reduce the gap (about .004" for every 50 hp you add). However, when you add a high power ignition system (such as those offered by MSD, Crane, Nology) you can open the gap from .002-.005"."
      >END FAQ<

    18. Member boraIV's Avatar
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      07-15-2003 03:24 PM #43
      Well damn, I couldn't find a place that sold BKR7E i could only find the -11 part. I guess i'll be getting some autolites. Thanks for the info, i guess i neglected the FAQ.

    19. Member
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      07-15-2003 08:54 PM #44
      What about sparkplugs.com? http://www.sparkplugs.com/resu...BKR7E
      -Ian

    20. 07-16-2003 07:40 PM #45
      Quote, originally posted by swett &raquo;
      What about sparkplugs.com? http://www.sparkplugs.com/resu...BKR7E
      -Ian

      Yup, I ordered two sets from them last week. [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

    21. 07-17-2003 01:31 PM #46
      None of you guys change your plugs seasonally?
      I've probably tried all the plugs one can get at Autozone. Made a database so I can compare ignition advance (VAG-COM) to weather conditions.
      The plug that works best for me is one of the plain Bosch platinums.

    22. 07-29-2003 12:29 PM #47
      How often should a chipped 1.8T have it's plugs changed?

    23. 07-29-2003 03:36 PM #48
      Quote, originally posted by TUR-80 &raquo;
      If I had $1 for everytime I saw someone post "platinum spark plugs are bad for your car", I'd be rich by now.
      IF PLATINUM PLUGS ARE SO BAD, WHY DO VW AND AUDI FIT THEM AS STANDARD TO OUR CARS?
      Give it a break...

      The main advantage invoked by the manufacturing and the use of Platinum Tipped Spark plugs over the "Conventional" Copper Plugs (and I don't mean that in a bad way) is that it cuts down on environmental waste, and to a certain point, New Car Warranties.
      Platinum tipped plugs typically have a much longer serviceable life span than conventional copper plugs
      Pro and Cons.... Manufacturers warranty and the "All Service" included for "X" Number of years is good for the Manufacturers, since it costs them less in that they are "longer lasting".
      Cons... They typically don't offer the same performance as a conventional copper plug (mind you, 99% of you won't be able to FEEL or Quantifiably Evaluate the difference between OEM platinum vs Copper Plug). As well, Backyard mechanics and enthusiasts get Raked for the cost of Platinum Tipped Plugs vs Conventional Copper Plugs, in that they typically don't cost 4-5x the price to make.
      Save you time and money, go OEM in 95% of the cases. If you at Stage 3, then perhaps it's worth going the route of Copper or "Alternate" type plugs.

    24. Member caj1's Avatar
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      07-29-2003 04:10 PM #49
      For me, not having to worry about changing plugs every 10K (and associated risks to damaging the head, interlocking threads, damaging the coil, etc.) outweigh the negligible performance difference between platinum and copper. I agree, stick with stock unless you've done some serious modifications.

    25. 07-29-2003 04:34 PM #50
      I have read this thread and I still don't know what is one temp range COLDER than the stock NGK PFR6Q?

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