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    Thread: Best 4-cyl & 6-cyl engines

    1. Member
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      08-16-2005 03:36 PM #26
      Quote, originally posted by 3wheelinWolf »
      Hehe..this is funny. I have been interested in the L-18 as a possibility. I want as much reliable HP/TQ as I can get. Any idea what power these guys were making?

      In 1970, the L16 with the 2-stage 2bbl was putting out 100hp @ around 6k. I'd expect the L18 to put out around 115 - 120.
      --Chuck--

    2. Geriatric Member Obin Robinson's Avatar
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      08-16-2005 03:37 PM #27
      Quote, originally posted by 3wheelinWolf »
      Hehe..this is funny. I have been interested in the L-18 as a possibility. I want as much reliable HP/TQ as I can get. Any idea what power these guys were making?

      they were saying that it was about ~100hp/litre for those old Datsun motors and still remaining reliable. it's all in the machining. i'm not a Datsun whiz; i'm far from it actually. here's what i can offer to you though which sounds like the stuff the SCCA racers were talking about:
      http://zcarchat.com/showthread.php?p=10722
      one thing to note is that they were running dual Weber DCOEs (or equivalent) so those motors are getting "fed" a lot of air and were running a pretty hot cam. they still purred like kittens though.
      obin [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG] [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]


      Modified by Obin Robinson at 3:43 PM 8-16-2005
      "We're society's crowbar. They hate us, they never want to acknowledge the dirty jobs they give us to do, but when the job is done they never throw us away - they just slip us back in the toolbox until they need us the next time. And there will always be a next time."-Jim Hooper. Beneath the Visiting Moon: Images of Combat in Southern Africa

    3. 08-16-2005 03:40 PM #28
      Quote, originally posted by Adam H »
      SBC!
      Wait. . .

      you are not that far off...I present you the GM 4.3 V6, essentially a SBC minus 2 cylinders.

    4. 08-16-2005 03:44 PM #29
      Quote, originally posted by Nface01 »
      Ford 300Ci Inline 6 Why?
      1)bullet proof
      2)Quick
      3)20mpg
      4)Tow's like a bull being whipped.
      Mine with nothing but ignition and free flowing exhaust 162whp 243ft lbs. Mmm baby.

      i concur on this one. best 6 i have ever had the pleasure to own.





      Modified by corpsedub at 12:49 PM 8-16-2005

    5. Member enzo1187's Avatar
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      08-16-2005 03:55 PM #30
      Quote, originally posted by Hawkmoon »
      [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

      The VQ is def. one of the best 6's [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG] . Imo though, the best 6 is most definetly the inline six in the E46 M3. It's putting out 333hp out of a 3.2 liter. Thats over 100hp per liter. IMO, HP per liter shows the true level of engineering. As for 4 cylinders, the Vtec in the S2000 takes the cake. Nearly 120 HP per liter!
      Natural Aspiration>Boost



      Modified by enzo1187 at 12:58 PM 8-16-2005

    6. 08-16-2005 04:00 PM #31
      my vote goes to the jeep I6 4.0l
      on my second with near 950k miles between them.

    7. Member HarryHood's Avatar
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      08-16-2005 04:01 PM #32
      Has anyone seriously explored the possibility of swapping one of Saab's 2.3l four cylinder engines (i.e., the 230/250 hp, 258 lb-ft versions found in the 9-5 Aero and 9-3 Viggen) into something? Those engines are jewels, torque monsters that could cause serious damage if stuffed into a RWD car. I've seen a classic 900 with that engine swapped in, but no one else seems dumb enough to do it.
      Anyone?
      Caretaker of the National Strategic Beer Reserve

    8. Member M12's Avatar
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      08-16-2005 04:03 PM #33
      4 Cylinders- RSX Engine
      Why? You could go NA and make a lot HP or go FI and still get a lot of HP.

      6 Cylinder- NA - E46 M3 Engine, high reving inline 6, enough said.
      FI- I would probably go with the bullet proof supra turbo engine, also enough said.

    9. 08-16-2005 04:10 PM #34
      subaru ej22.

    10. Member WannaCorrado's Avatar
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      08-16-2005 04:21 PM #35
      new BMW inline 6 hands down.

    11. 08-16-2005 04:32 PM #36
      I'm a Subaru guy - but when it comes to cheap, reliable, powerfull fours with a ton of aftermarket support and swapability - I'm going to have to go with the 4G63T.

    12. 08-16-2005 04:45 PM #37
      inline 4 - Honda K series, Nissan SR
      inline 6 - BMW and Nissan RB
      V6 - Nissan VQ and Honda J series


      Modified by psteng19 at 8:50 AM 8-17-2005

    13. 08-16-2005 05:00 PM #38
      Low emissions, low maintenance, good fuel economy, good power, smooth and durable.
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    14. Member paskal's Avatar
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      08-16-2005 05:37 PM #39
      Quote, originally posted by WannaCorrado »
      new BMW inline 6 hands down.


      The BMW inline six-cylinder engine has long been recognized as one of the very few truly superb powerplants of the automotive industry. And the new 3.0-liter, 24-valve version of the celebrated BMW inline six-cylinder engine continues this tradition, offering even greater power, refinement, response, and efficiency.
      This new engine features a number of pioneering technologies, including Valvetronic and an electronically controlled water pump that uses less power than conventional pumps, which contributes to the engine’s increased power output. And the new engine block, made of an advanced, lightweight composite magnesium/aluminum, increases the engine’s overall power-to-weight ratio.

    15. 08-16-2005 05:51 PM #40
      How about the best of both worlds?

    16. 08-16-2005 10:31 PM #41
      Quote, originally posted by Uber Wagon »
      I would say Honda's VTEC Four cylinders for 4-Cylinders.
      And BMW Straight six for six cylinders.
      Never figured out the availability of parts, because I never had any problems... [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

      [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG] [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]
      If cost is a factor, Honda's DOHC non vtec's arent bad either!

    17. Senior Member VarianceVQ's Avatar
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      08-16-2005 10:44 PM #42
      4-cylinder:
      The 1.8T may nevar lose but the KA24DE can nevar die.

      6-cylinder:
      The Nissan VQ is damn versatile and is probably the best V6 engine ever made.
      BMW is most likely the NA inline-6 king.
      Everybody's dying, bitch; let's get you some fruit.

    18. Geriatric Member Obin Robinson's Avatar
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      08-16-2005 10:47 PM #43
      you people which keep suggesting these bigass DOHC 4 and 6 cylinder motors are forgetting the points outlined below by the original poster:
      Quote, originally posted by 3wheelinWolf »
      Criteria to consider:
      1. Weight
      2. Cost to build
      3. Complexity
      4. FI or NA
      5. Realistic gross HP/TQ
      6. Running temps
      7. Emissions
      8. Engine/parts availability

      1. DOHC motors are heavier than SOHC. that's a fact.
      2. DOHC motors have many more parts in them, and cost more to build as well as more to do machine work on.
      3. DOHC motors are more complex than the equivalent SOHC by the same manufacturer.
      4. DOHC motors are often tougher to turbocharge or add superchargers to.
      5. DOHC motors do have the advantage for horsepower and torque, but an SOHC motor can be brought right up to those levels with some proper port/polish, valve grind, flow match, and cam work.
      6. DOHC motors run hotter than equivalent SOHC motor by same manufacturer.
      7. emissions aren't that much better (or worse) from a DOHC than they are from an SOHC. there's no real advantage here.
      8. parts availability shouldn't matter. but it should be noted that there's a whole lot less parts to hunt down for an SOHC than there are for a DOHC motor.
      yeah, i love Cosworth BDTs as much as the next guy, but the answer to this thread clearly calls for what you'd consider if you were going to perform a swap. i'd rather plug in those FIVE simple electrical connections to a SOHC carbed motor than mess with the rat's nest of the electrical nightmare known as a Honda, BMW, Porsche, Toyota, Nissan, or similar wiring harness.
      obin
      "We're society's crowbar. They hate us, they never want to acknowledge the dirty jobs they give us to do, but when the job is done they never throw us away - they just slip us back in the toolbox until they need us the next time. And there will always be a next time."-Jim Hooper. Beneath the Visiting Moon: Images of Combat in Southern Africa

    19. 08-16-2005 10:56 PM #44
      Quote, originally posted by Obin Robinson »
      you people which keep suggesting these bigass DOHC 4 and 6 cylinder motors are forgetting the points outlined below by the original poster:
      1. DOHC motors are heavier than SOHC. that's a fact.
      2. DOHC motors have many more parts in them, and cost more to build as well as more to do machine work on.
      3. DOHC motors are more complex than the equivalent SOHC by the same manufacturer.
      4. DOHC motors are often tougher to turbocharge or add superchargers to.
      5. DOHC motors do have the advantage for horsepower and torque, but an SOHC motor can be brought right up to those levels with some proper port/polish, valve grind, flow match, and cam work.
      6. DOHC motors run hotter than equivalent SOHC motor by same manufacturer.
      7. emissions aren't that much better (or worse) from a DOHC than they are from an SOHC. there's no real advantage here.
      8. parts availability shouldn't matter. but it should be noted that there's a whole lot less parts to hunt down for an SOHC than there are for a DOHC motor.
      yeah, i love Cosworth BDTs as much as the next guy, but the answer to this thread clearly calls for what you'd consider if you were going to perform a swap. i'd rather plug in those FIVE simple electrical connections to a SOHC carbed motor than mess with the rat's nest of the electrical nightmare known as a Honda, BMW, Porsche, Toyota, Nissan, or similar wiring harness.
      obin


      Yay! I was beginning to wonder if anyone remembered...
      Are any of these motors comparabl in terms of weight? If possible I'd like to stay as close to 50/50 as I can get.

    20. Moderator TREGinginCO's Avatar
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      08-16-2005 10:59 PM #45
      here's my list... not in any particular order.

      1: Honda's 3.5 V6
      2: Nissan's 3.5 VQ series V6
      3: Volkswagen's 4-cylinder TDI engines
      4: BMW's Inline 6

    21. 08-16-2005 11:01 PM #46
      My vote for the 4 cylinder is the 1600cc VW aicooled engine.
      1. Weight: I can lift it, so its pretty light.
      2. Cost to Build: Probably THE cheapest engine to build.
      3. Complexity: Pushrods and a crankcase, not even a water pump.
      4. FI or NA: FI is always a possibility, but NA is generally the way to go.
      5. Realistic gross HP/TQ: Ok we're lacking here, but theres good potential with a few mods!
      6. Running Temps: Once again, a little iffy, afterall it is aircooled. But hey their all over the place in Mexico, so their not THAT bad.
      7. Emissions: Considering how old it is the emissions arent that bad.
      8. Engine/parts availability: Its a VW Beetle engine, the most successful selling car in the world, finding one is easy, and parts are unbelievably cheap and easy to come across.

    22. 08-16-2005 11:03 PM #47
      Quote, originally posted by HarryHood »
      Has anyone seriously explored the possibility of swapping one of Saab's 2.3l four cylinder engines (i.e., the 230/250 hp, 258 lb-ft versions found in the 9-5 Aero and 9-3 Viggen) into something? Those engines are jewels, torque monsters that could cause serious damage if stuffed into a RWD car. I've seen a classic 900 with that engine swapped in, but no one else seems dumb enough to do it.
      Anyone?

      I posted a video of just such a beast once upon a time. Forget what I titled the topic, but it's here. Saab 2.3 turbo into a rwd Ford Sierra...
      call it potatography

    23. Geriatric Member AKADriver's Avatar
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      08-16-2005 11:13 PM #48
      Quote, originally posted by Obin Robinson »
      1. DOHC motors are heavier than SOHC. that's a fact.
      2. DOHC motors have many more parts in them, and cost more to build as well as more to do machine work on.
      3. DOHC motors are more complex than the equivalent SOHC by the same manufacturer.
      4. DOHC motors are often tougher to turbocharge or add superchargers to.
      5. DOHC motors do have the advantage for horsepower and torque, but an SOHC motor can be brought right up to those levels with some proper port/polish, valve grind, flow match, and cam work.
      6. DOHC motors run hotter than equivalent SOHC motor by same manufacturer.
      7. emissions aren't that much better (or worse) from a DOHC than they are from an SOHC. there's no real advantage here.
      8. parts availability shouldn't matter. but it should be noted that there's a whole lot less parts to hunt down for an SOHC than there are for a DOHC motor.
      yeah, i love Cosworth BDTs as much as the next guy, but the answer to this thread clearly calls for what you'd consider if you were going to perform a swap. i'd rather plug in those FIVE simple electrical connections to a SOHC carbed motor than mess with the rat's nest of the electrical nightmare known as a Honda, BMW, Porsche, Toyota, Nissan, or similar wiring harness.
      obin

      1. The weight difference between a DOHC and SOHC four is negligible. The Honda K20 DOHC weighs about the same as one of their D17 SOHC engines. Those old SOHC iron block engines were HEAVY!
      2. True, if you're machining the head, but for most part this won't be necessary for a newer engine. You don't need to port the DOHC/16v head because it already flows better out of the box than a race-ported SOHC/8v head. This is proven fact for the case of Mopar 2.2 8v vs. 2.0 16v.
      3. One more cam, eight more valves and cam followers.
      4. I can't think of a case where this is true. In fact many SOHC/8v engines are more difficult because they're counterflow, packing intake and exhaust on one side of the motor and leaving little room for a compressor.
      5. See #2
      6. Possibly, if you're producing more power from a smaller unit there will be more waste heat, but the combustion and cooling will be more efficient from a more modern engine.
      7. Sometimes. Most SOHC engines are older designs.
      8. Cams are sold in pairs and valves are sold in sets of 16 for DOHC engines so there's nothing more to hunt down.
      I'd rather plug in a nice simple Honda or Chrysler engine harness than deal with needle valves and floats and jets and junk.
      Splinter - Team Post-Killing Ninja
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    24. Member jddaigle's Avatar
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      08-17-2005 12:02 AM #49
      Quote, originally posted by rx7racr »
      Volvo B230FT!

      +1000 ! Reliable, durable, cheap, powerful, tuneable. What's not to like?


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    25. Member ElixXxeR's Avatar
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      08-17-2005 02:23 AM #50
      I'm a new car fan, so I would say the best 4-cylinder is hands-down the 2.0T FSI from audi/volkswagen...the engine simply kicks ass. For best V6's I have a few that are worthy of mention. Nissan's fabulous VQ, VW's VR6 and BMW's inline 6. All kickass engines.

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