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    Thread: DIY: Timing Belt And Coolant Pump Replacement on 2.0 AEG! Pics Inside!

    1. 09-18-2006 12:56 PM #51
      well i removed the timing belt before i marked the teeth like a jackass. how can i tell if the crank is at TDC? someone said there was a little window somewhere that will tell you when it's at TDC?

    2. 10-06-2006 03:02 PM #52
      Nice looking DIY. I'm gonna use this on the wifes '99.5 Jetta 2.slow.
      Gotta do my 1.8T as well thou.
      Quote, originally posted by troyboy96 »
      pretty please

      Yes. Can we have a DIY for the 1.8T AWW PRETTY, PRETTY PLEASE????


      Modified by Uber1Golf at 3:12 PM 10-6-2006

    3. 10-06-2006 04:21 PM #53
      Hey. I Dug it out. Here's the DIY for a 1.8T
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2840728
      We should have a link to this on the DIY page.

    4. 11-02-2006 01:59 PM #54
      Great piece of work. Planning to tackle it this weekend.
      Couple questions please. Do you have pic of correct alignment of tensioner finger and Y mark? I am unsure about getting the tension right.
      2) Do I have to hand turn the crank 2 rotations when done? It scares me having to get the last quarter turn uninterrupted.
      Thanks,

    5. Member vasillalov's Avatar
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      11-04-2006 09:23 PM #55
      Quote, originally posted by jumpi »
      2) Do I have to hand turn the crank 2 rotations when done? It scares me having to get the last quarter turn uninterrupted.

      YES! Better do it slowly by hand then have the starter turn the engine fast and smash the valves if the tension is lost. By going it by hand you are checking to see if the pistons will hit the valves BEFORE you actually start the engine. When you are testing by hand you can feel the resistance and back off....
      Quote Originally Posted by MAG58 View Post
      Please consider your audience before saying something sensible. 80% of TCL drivers were actually banned from Formula 1 for being too fast.
      A turbocharger is a device in where exhaust gases go in, witchcraft happens, and then you go faster.

    6. Member darisd's Avatar
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      12-14-2006 08:28 PM #56
      Awesome writeup. I actually just got around to doing this to the wife's car (contrary to my previous post). Almost done (stitching it up now). I have a few comments:
      1: Dealing with that F$#%ing engine mount is by far the most trying step. The AC and PS pressure lines were all in the way of the "easy" route back towards the firewall. Up was not working either because of the water pump and the tensioner. I ended up just taking the tensioner off the stud, unlacing the timing belt from the camshaft drive, and letting the whole mess fall to the floor. This caused a problem getting the fricking thing back on. Contrary to the instructions in the Bentley manual (which is all sorts of wrong on this procedure BTW), you CANNOT get the tensioner on with the belt on the crank and cam sprockets. The only way to get them on is to put the belt on the crank sprocket, tensioner, and then the camshaft sprocket. However, you also cannot get the mount on the motor with the tensioner on. My solution, in order (starting after the water pump has been replaced):
      a) Put the belt on, correctly lined up with the marks, to all three pulleys (crank water cam). Try to push it as far towards the engine as possible.
      b) Take the mount up from the bottom of the motor, and carefully bend the belt 90 degrees so that it lays flat against the crankcase. Move the post (that sits on the tooth side of the belt) over the belt. Hook this post over the water pump drive.
      c) Now get the tensioner on the stud. Move the mount up as far as it will go and wiggle it over the stud. It will not go very far because of the timing belt.
      d) Working carefully with two hands (three would be too many) take the belt off the camshaft drive. Move the belt onto the tensioner, and while the tensioner is still not all the way on, reposition the timing belt onto the very edge of the camshaft drive sprocket. Now move the belt and tensioner slowly a centimeter at a time towards the engine. At some point, you might want to start one of the bolts for the engine mount just to keep it from getting in your way, but you can't do this at the beginning else you won't be able to get the tensioner on.
      2: I would put the motor at TDC anyways, as much of a pain as it is. The motor for me stopped somewhere in compression, and when I took the belt off the camshaft sprocket the crankshaft pulley took off and turned about 15 degrees. Definitely a "ANNNNGH STOOOOOP!!!!" moment.
      3: The top rear bolt on the engine-side motor mount was impossible to work with properly. It was too recessed in the mount and too close to the frame rail. I ended up not torquing it because it was impossible to get a tool in there. Of any one step, this took the most time. I estimate it took me an hour total to take this one fricking bolt off and then put it back on again. This leads me to the next point.
      4: I would recommend taking the drivers side mount-to-frame bolts off and moving the motor towards the drivers side about three centimeters, ala the VR6 water pump procedure. This would make getting the mount off and on and the belt on SO MUCH EASIER. Really, it is not that big a deal to do, I would have done it except it was too late to get together (one floor jack). The easiest way is to take some sand, throw it on the floor, then put a plywood piece over the sand, jack(s) on top of that, and then one person can move the engine over the floor extremely easily by pushing against the plywood with their feet.
      5: Tension the pulley AFTER running your two-revolution test. Two reasons. One, get the motor mount back on first else you will drop the motor on your face. Almost happened to me. Two, you want the pulley tension to be equal on the tensioner and water pump sides before you tension.
      Oh, and the water pump impeller was disintegrating. Pulling it out of the block it started to crack and fall apart in a few spots.
      Wish me luck with the final steps!

    7. 12-26-2006 07:11 PM #57
      Is it really as easy as the writeup or should I just pay the $500 to get it replaced and forget about spending all weekend on it?

    8. Member O2VW1.8T's Avatar
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      12-26-2006 07:24 PM #58
      we had a tech at work who can do the 2.0L water pumps is 25 minutes flat and he was already on a test drive... i guess when you do over a few hundred you find crazy ways to do it.. He made a couple special tools tool.
      02 GTi 1.8T haldex'd w/35r-SOLD 7.3@102mph 27psi on 93 octane--04 A4 1.8T converted to AWD also- SOLD--'11 JSW Tdi 6speed Manual- Gone--
      13' BMW 335i M-sport EBII

    9. 12-29-2006 06:46 AM #59
      i just did my timing belt and water pump over last weekend and i was able to get it done in 5 hours, and that includes laying out the tools, taking short breaks, moping up coolant, putting up my tools and cleaning up. [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]
      i couldn't have done it that fast without your DIY [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

    10. 01-08-2007 10:16 PM #60
      I popped my cherry big time
      Took me about 5 hours going real slow and triple-checking everything and taking pictures for documentation... I replaced the water pump, timing belt, timing roller, serpentine belt - and G12. Only needed 1.5 liters + the same of distilled water. It took what seemed like forever for all of it to drain out of the radiator!
      One bonus I found out is that the previous guys that replaced the water pump never fully put back one of the power steering resivoir clamps back on (why they slid it off I don't know) and it was leaking PS fluid a little. Score!
      I used the mark and match method for timing. I wanted to use the "real" method but I wasn't able to read the timing mark on my stick shift hole. Plus I didn't want to keep turning the crank to get to TDC on the cam and also on the crank/tranny. Next time I won't use pink nailpolish - made it difficult to tell between the dried G12
      The most difficult part was putting on the new timing belt but after a few tries following the How-To's method I got it. I used a SUV 3 ton jack to raise and lower the engine which made it easy to raise and lower the engine to get the motor mount out and back in.
      Replacing the serpentine belt was cake. I wish I had to replace it every 3,000 miles, it was so easy. I put a small screwdriver into the serpentine belt tensioner to take off the tension while I worked with it. I tightened all the bolts to goodntight since I didn't have any torque specs.
      It was interesting to note that my water pump was replaced about 30k miles ago. The impeller was identical to mine except it was plastic, not metal. Weird I figured 23 months ago they'd have the updated metal replacement.
      Got my parts from MJM AutoHaus.
      1 thing about the write-up/steps I would change is not to mark-n-match anything until you're done taking everything else off that needs to come off. Also I changed the order of some steps so that I minimized the bolts I cranked on and took off while the engine was suspended by the jack. Just a few changes to mitigate errors from being introduced or catastrophes happening from potentially rocking the engine off the jack (hey, I'm a surgeon so I'm anal like that).
      [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG] Great writeup!!!
      P.S. I took some pics in case anyone wants to see them from slightly different angles, etc from the write-up.


      Modified by Bontrager at 7:55 PM 1-13-2007

    11. 02-11-2007 02:49 PM #61
      Great DIY!
      One note: I used ramps to lift the front of the car (instead of jack stands) and did not remove the passenger side wheel. This did not appear to limit my access in any way.

    12. 08-26-2007 12:45 PM #62
      A big thank you is in order. I followed your instructions and 8 hours later the job is done. The hardest part for me was.... if you can believe it putting the accessory belt back on. The new belt that came in the kit I purchased wouldn't fit. Anyway, everthing else went fine. Thanks for sharing the DIY. My car has 99.5K miles on it and it was time to change the belt and water pump for sure. The water pump propeller fell apart in pieces when I removed it. I used a new metal one. I think I got all the pieces out. Fingers Crossed. Thanks again.
      Bobby

    13. 09-03-2007 10:17 PM #63
      the DIY the keeps on giving!! thanks man!
      i used ur DIY but my Timing Belt shredded the teeth so it was impossibel to count the number of teeth. i just got it on there as tight as possible and aligned the timing marks on the flywheel and the camshaft sprocket. and now it works but is idiling very rough! any suggestion? maybe im a tooth off? =/

    14. 09-07-2007 08:21 AM #64
      Just finished the Timing belt on an ABA engine. I used a silver Sharpie to do the Mark and Match method. Worked great. I would recommend rotating the crank to something close to TDC just because it puts the camshaft in a position that is less likely to rotote from valve spring pressure. At least I think that's true. The position I started in was not too good as the camshaft snapped to a new position as soon as the old belt was off (due to the loaded valve springs). Took me by surprise and pinched my finger . It then took me a while to get the new belt in position. I used a small Quick-Grip clamp to lightly clamp the new belt to the cam sprocket because every time I got the belt on the crank sprocket, the belt wanted to slip off the cam sprocket. Clamping it helped a lot. Don't forget that the lower motor mount bolt goes in AFTER you fit the lower timing belt cover (oops). Do yourself a favor and order a new rubber crankcase breather tube (cheap) as both my ABA engines have needed new ones. They crumble after 90K miles.

    15. 09-07-2007 07:57 PM #65
      Just found this link, ater I finished the job. I wish I had seen it earlier. I was wondering why there wasn't an ABA DIY on here. This is excellent! http://faculty.ccp.edu/faculty...x.htm

    16. Member FlyBy's Avatar
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      09-18-2007 03:32 PM #66
      Is this the same procedure for the AZG engines? I think that I'm going to do my 2.0 wagon before winter. It has 100,780 on the clock. I waited until 170,000 on my old ABA Jetta.
      Beige Glovebox FS: PM me.

    17. Member vasillalov's Avatar
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      09-18-2007 05:54 PM #67
      Yep, same procedure for all MK4 2.0 engines.
      Quote Originally Posted by MAG58 View Post
      Please consider your audience before saying something sensible. 80% of TCL drivers were actually banned from Formula 1 for being too fast.
      A turbocharger is a device in where exhaust gases go in, witchcraft happens, and then you go faster.

    18. 09-20-2007 11:23 AM #68
      Thanks for taking the time to write this incredible post.
      Cheers.
      "Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Stock"

    19. 02-02-2008 08:25 PM #69
      can this procedure be used on a 2.0 new beetle

    20. Member vasillalov's Avatar
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      02-03-2008 08:54 AM #70
      Yes it the same engine.
      Quote Originally Posted by MAG58 View Post
      Please consider your audience before saying something sensible. 80% of TCL drivers were actually banned from Formula 1 for being too fast.
      A turbocharger is a device in where exhaust gases go in, witchcraft happens, and then you go faster.

    21. 02-22-2008 10:12 PM #71
      how much would this procedure cost if done in a shop? (labor only)

    22. 02-23-2008 08:07 PM #72
      What happened to the photos? They are all gone...

    23. Member vasillalov's Avatar
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      02-25-2008 01:16 AM #73
      Sorry,
      I forgot to renew my domain registration. Pics should be back online! If not, refresh your DNS settings if you can.
      Vasil
      Quote Originally Posted by MAG58 View Post
      Please consider your audience before saying something sensible. 80% of TCL drivers were actually banned from Formula 1 for being too fast.
      A turbocharger is a device in where exhaust gases go in, witchcraft happens, and then you go faster.

    24. 03-03-2008 10:34 PM #74
      Thanks for getting the photos back up! Quick question, Step 3 you say to turn the 19mm crank bolt at the bottom "counter clockwise" to line up the timing marks on the cam sprocket and valve cover. Is this correct? I thought we should only turn the engine clockwise? When I'm turning the crank is it supposed to get hard to turn? Thanks again.

    25. 03-10-2008 03:25 PM #75
      First post here, but just wanted to say thanks for posting such a comprehensive DIY! With the help of your post, I was able to replace the water pump on my 2003 Jetta, (2.0) in about 5 hours. The kit from ECS tuning was perfect, (although if I had to do it again, i probably would have sprung for the tensioner tool rather than use the bent needle nose).
      The only thing I would add, is that the hardest part, by far, was removing/unbolting the part of the motor mount that is attatched to the engine block! As described, there are three bolts;
      Bolt 1- can see from under the car. you can unbolt it, but will need to lower the engine down to actually get the bolt out. This is the "easy" bolt.
      Bolt 2- can NOT see this bolt, but you can feel it. while under the car, reach straight up past bolt 1 and slide your hand towards the top of the mount, feel for the bolt head, it is slightly recessed.
      I took the socket off the driver and placed it on the bolt head. Then I raised the engine until I could see the socket, (If you are standing on the passenger side of the engine compartment looking down, it will be almost against the chasis, under where the coolant resevoir was.)
      Once you raise the engine enough to see the socket, you can use a swivel head connection to attach your driver to the socket you placed on the bolt head. take your time and watch your knuckles!
      Bolt 3- Leave the engine raised. In the center of the motor mount, there is a circular opening. This is where Bolt 3 is located. you can't really see it, but it is easily reached and removed with a socket wrench.
      As far as actually removing the mount, well, that is something I couldn't actually compelety figure out! I jacked the motor up and down a few times and was finally able to get it to a point that it was "out of the way" but I never fully "removed" it from the engine compartment. This proved to be a pain in the A$$ when it came time to adjust the tensioner.
      My jetta has 55k miles on it, and the impellor on the water pump was literally in half. Mechanics in my area wanted $675 - $850 to replace so I was more than happy to do it myself!
      Thanks again for making this topic! It saved me over $500 bucks!

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