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    Thread: A little how-to on chip repair.

    1. 04-17-2006 10:44 PM #1
      Hey guys - I was going to post in the "how-to" post, but it's locked. I posted this over at G35driver because I frequent it, but since I also enjoy this forum I thought I'd post here too.

      ================================================

      Remember, everything in this post is my opinion only. There ARE other ways to do this and lots of different products you can use. Also, remember that trying this is at your own risk. Damaging a paint via PC is hard, but with sandpaper it's very easy. So let's start:

      What you'll need:

      1) Matched paint. A jar is best, a pen is ok. You can get it at a dealer or local automotive store.

      2) A fine paint brush (medium bristles, fine tip), and/or a plastic toothpick.

      3) Rubbing alcohol, some automotive wash soap, access to water.

      4) Some sandpaper. I like Meg's unigrit 2000 and 3000. Non-unigrit and less than 2k at your own risk.

      5) A sanding block. Both soft and hard work. I prefer soft as it is easier to manipulate and can go around curves.

      6) Polishes. What kind of polishes will depend on if you're using a PC or not. I will be using a PC, but will include by-hand instructions.

      Onward.

      First make sure the car has been washed, what wash you use is up to you. How you wash it is also up to you but remember, two buckets and a quality mitt (or 3).

      Second, make sure the area you're repairing is clean. By clean I mean no sealants, waxes, nothing. To do this you'll need to a) use a cleaner polish or b) (my choice), wipe with ISA:water. What's that? It's rubbing alcohol (the regular 70% kind) mixed 50:50 in a spray bottle with water. Spray the area thoroughly and wipe. Do this twice. You want *no* dirt, wax, anything in the chip.

      Alright, so filling in the chip/scratch. Two ways to do this, first I will go with my choice for chips and that's using a plastic toothpick. Before I go on, there are good instructions on how to do this here: http://autopia-carcare.com/inf....html. I basically follow the same process. Dip the toothpick into the paint about half way up, then touch the tip of the pick to the center of the chip and capillary action will pull the paint into the chip. It will take a couple passes to level it out so let the paint dry at least 4 hours in between and be patient.

      The other way is good too, but less accurate. It's good for scratches that are larger than chips and would take too long to fill in via the toothpick method. Put a little paint on to your brush (very little, immerse maybe 1/4 of the brushes tip), and touch the tip to the center of the scratch. You'll see the paint pull into the scratch. Depending on the size begin to move the brush in one direction through the scratch. Repeat this every 4 hours until you're level.

      Whether or not you add a layer of clear is up to you. I normally do as I find it makes the paint match better after sanding/polishing.

      Alright, so now you have a blob, sort of like this:

      Or in the case of a scratch, like this:

      No go have a beer and wait until tomorrow (or better yet, two days from now, then come back). This is important - let the paint dry or odds are you'll pop the chip right out when sanding.

      The night before you said put the sandpaper in some water and let is soak overnight.

      Alright so sanding time. This is the tricky part so go slow and be patient. Make sure the paper is right on the block (you'll probably have to cut it) and then spray the blob with a mixture of water and some soap (just mix some in a spray bottle), spray liberally and then start sanding. I like to sand against the blob, so the figure out which way the blob is longer and sand the opposite way. Sand very light, apply almost no pressure and try to keep the block flat. Also, sand in one direction, not back and forth. It's counter-intuitive but it helps. So swipe one way, lift, then repeat. Check your work often by wiping away with a mf towel. Before you do spray the area liberally again with the soapy water to lift up any particulates. You're done when the blob is level with the paint (as in, you can not feel it by running your finger over it gently). You'll have something that looks like this:

      And you'll probably be really nervous, but you're ok. As long as you were patient and sanded lightly you will not have removed more than a fraction of your clear. Just be careful!

      Now clean the area with your ISA:water and get ready to polish.

      If you're polishing by hand I hope you used uni-grit and 2500+ paper, because otherwise you're going to be really sweaty when this is over. Assuming you did grab your polish of choice. Products I like by hand are:

      Sonus SFX-2
      Poorboys SSR2.5
      Menzerna Intensive Polish
      Meg's ScratchX

      I'd start with something like Sonus SFX-2 or PB's 2.5 on a cotton applicator. Apply a dab about the size of a quarter then start to rub. You *will* need to apply pressure and move quickly. You're trying to generate heat. Repeat until the marring is gone, or 90% gone then use ScratchX to clean it up. You should have nice smooth paint, and the chip should be 100% gone. Remember, working by hand is tough - so you might not achieve the results you want. If that's the case I always recommend investing in a PC.

      By PC I like the same products (minus the ScratchX and add Optimum Compound), or if you're in a hurry SFX-1, Menzerna PG, or PB's SSR3. I usually use SFX-2 via or Optimum Compound an orange LC pad (medium abrasive), and just polish as normal. Apply a couple dabs to the pad, work in at speed 3 for 20-30 seconds and apply enough pressure than the PC almost bogs down, then kick it to 6 and apply the same pressure until the polish flashes. One or two passes will take out 2500-3000 grit marks easily.

      Now, if you have some marring that isn't coming out you can do one of two things. One, use a stronger combo of pad+polish, or two, sand again with a higher grit then polish.

      When you're done clean again with isa:water then apply the wax/sealant on your choice and call it a day. Here are the afters of the chips/scratches I posted above.

      The blob was in the circle.

      Scratch was in the circle.

      Questions, comments? You know where to find me.



      Modified by picus at 7:45 PM 4-17-2006


      Modified by picus at 8:49 AM 4-18-2006


    2. 04-18-2006 09:02 AM #2
      Excellent DIY

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      04-18-2006 09:12 AM #3
      Wow great job You have given hope to my stone chipped hood

    4. 04-18-2006 11:48 AM #4
      Thanks guys.

      ritchic, If your hood started like mine last year and was really sand-blasted, there is a better (and easier) way to do this. This DYI is for a small amount (although you could do a lot), just because it would take so long to do 20+ chips with a toothpick. Later this week if I get time I am going to add to it with a "how to do this with a spray can" deal. It takes a little more finesse, but the results are good and it takes a heck of a lot less time. Here's a before/after I just did of a civic si with a duplicor spray can.



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      04-18-2006 01:12 PM #5
      ^^

      WOW, please post that up. I have a spot on my rear bumper that I could use the spray method. Looks very similar to your picture.


    6. 04-18-2006 08:55 PM #6
      Quote, originally posted by picus »
      Thanks guys.

      ritchic, If your hood started like mine last year and was really sand-blasted, there is a better (and easier) way to do this. This DYI is for a small amount (although you could do a lot), just because it would take so long to do 20+ chips with a toothpick. Later this week if I get time I am going to add to it with a "how to do this with a spray can" deal. It takes a little more finesse, but the results are good and it takes a heck of a lot less time. Here's a before/after I just did of a civic si with a duplicor spray can.


      Please do and again very nice work. i will be atempting this next week on my bumper I'll let you know how it goes

    7. 04-19-2006 08:56 PM #7
      Quote, originally posted by picus »
      Thanks guys.

      ritchic, If your hood started like mine last year and was really sand-blasted, there is a better (and easier) way to do this. This DYI is for a small amount (although you could do a lot), just because it would take so long to do 20+ chips with a toothpick. Later this week if I get time I am going to add to it with a "how to do this with a spray can" deal. It takes a little more finesse, but the results are good and it takes a heck of a lot less time. Here's a before/after I just did of a civic si with a duplicor spray can.


      That'd be great to have in house. I just farm that stuff out to one of my
      best friends, who's a painter.


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      04-24-2006 12:04 PM #8
      Any word on when you will have this spray method posted? I am anxious to get my bumper done

    9. 04-24-2006 02:02 PM #9
      Hey sorry - I've been slacking with posts because I've been crazy busy. I'll try my best to get to it by the end of the week. It may have less pictures than the one above but I'll explain everything I do in detail.

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      04-25-2006 07:39 AM #10

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      04-25-2006 08:55 PM #11
      Quote, originally posted by picus »

      remember that trying this is at your own risk. Damaging a paint via PC is hard, but with sandpaper it's very easy. So let's start:

      What you'll need:

      1) Matched paint. A jar is best, a pen is ok. You can get it at a dealer or local automotive store.

      2) A fine paint brush (medium bristles, fine tip), and/or a plastic toothpick.

      3) Rubbing alcohol, some automotive wash soap, access to water.

      4) Some sandpaper. I like Meg's unigrit 2000 and 3000. Non-unigrit and less than 2k at your own risk.

      5) A sanding block. Both soft and hard work. I prefer soft as it is easier to manipulate and can go around curves.

      6) Polishes. What kind of polishes will depend on if you're using a PC or not. I will be using a PC, but will include by-hand instructions.

      Onward.

      <snip>

      If you're polishing by hand I hope you used uni-grit and 2500+ paper, because otherwise you're going to be really sweaty when this is over. Assuming you did grab your polish of choice. Products I like by hand are:

      Sonus SFX-2
      Poorboys SSR2.5
      Menzerna Intensive Polish
      Meg's ScratchX

      I'd start with something like Sonus SFX-2 or PB's 2.5 on a cotton applicator. Apply a dab about the size of a quarter then start to rub. You *will* need to apply pressure and move quickly. You're trying to generate heat. Repeat until the marring is gone, or 90% gone then use ScratchX to clean it up. You should have nice smooth paint, and the chip should be 100% gone. Remember, working by hand is tough - so you might not achieve the results you want. If that's the case I always recommend investing in a PC.

      By PC I like the same products (minus the ScratchX and add Optimum Compound), or if you're in a hurry SFX-1, Menzerna PG, or PB's SSR3. I usually use SFX-2 via or Optimum Compound an orange LC pad (medium abrasive), and just polish as normal. Apply a couple dabs to the pad, work in at speed 3 for 20-30 seconds and apply enough pressure than the PC almost bogs down, then kick it to 6 and apply the same pressure until the polish flashes. One or two passes will take out 2500-3000 grit marks easily.

      Now, if you have some marring that isn't coming out you can do one of two things. One, use a stronger combo of pad+polish, or two, sand again with a higher grit then polish.

      When you're done clean again with isa:water then apply the wax/sealant on your choice and call it a day. Here are the afters of the chips/scratches I posted above.

      T

      Great post.

      I have 4 of these on my door (small garage in old house , and lifting kids in and out of car seats). They only scratch the surface, and don't actually dent the metal.

      (again with the exposure cranked way up....

      I was wondering if I could use this as a temporary substitute for the PC 7424 to help get rid of em....


      It's an 8" orbital buffer (1/3hp, 1.6A 8400opm no load) I got from Crappy tire 5 years ago, I have one imitation lambswool bonnet. plus a ton of terry bonnets.

      along w the scratch x:

      I'm pretty happy with the rest of the finish on the car....

      How much elbow grease to get rid of one ding/scratch with the unigrit 2000/3000 combo? I hope to get a bottle of touch up paint and start this week on the painting part.

      Thanks,
      P


      Modified by quiksilver18T at 1:58 AM 4-26-2006


      Modified by quiksilver18T at 2:02 AM 4-26-2006


    12. 04-25-2006 10:20 PM #12
      Are you sure that scuff is through the clear? It almost looks like it might be removable by a good buff. Have you tried the scratchx on it already? If not, give that a shot (scratchx requires some elbow grease), and if it's diminished odds are it isn't through the clear. If scratchx does nothing after a few passes then I'd explore the touchup option. If you do touchup and wetsand definitely use 3k grit since you'll be buffing by hand. Apply almost no pressure to the sandpaper. I'd advise grabbing a polish like sfx-2, or ssr2.5 to go along with the scratchx for removal of marring.

      I really do think by looking at it that it might buff right out.

      Regarding that polisher, I honestly can't say either way because I've never used one. That said (I hate making black and white statements like this) I wouldn't let one of those pads touch my paint in a million years. They just look way too aggressive, seems like a problem waiting to happen. I think that thing would probably be ok with a finishing bonnet to apply waxes/sealants, though.


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      04-26-2006 09:03 AM #13
      Picus,

      Thanks for your advice.

      I'm going to pick up a tube of Scratch X and give it a try with some elbow grease when I get a free moment.

      P


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      04-27-2006 12:13 AM #14
      Thanks Picus!

      A little elbow grease and the ScratchX and the scuff is 95% better than before.... I'll post some pics when I get a chance to crop them up.

      Thanks again,
      Peter


    15. 04-27-2006 08:53 AM #15
      Awesome, glad to hear it. If you ever decide to get a PC in the future you'll probably be able to take it out 100%.

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      04-28-2006 10:54 AM #16
      Can you fix a stone chip on my hood for me? I'll pay
      Signatures are for the insecure

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      04-28-2006 10:57 AM #17
      RE: UniGrit Sandpaper

      - is that available at Cdn Tire or other retail store?

      Thanks,
      P


    18. 04-28-2006 01:08 PM #18
      You are to Blame - Send me an e-mail (kevin@gtaindetail.com). It's what I do!

      quiksilver - unigrit is not available at CT as far as I know (ive never seen it), only the regular wet/dry 3M sandpaper, which is ok but not nearly as good. I ordered my unigrit online from the states (and just ordered a lot), it's actually not that expensive and you can ask them to ship USPS so you don't get hit on brokerage.

      I'm going to quickly write the "spray" how to right now. I'm sorry in advance for lack of pics and any oversights, just really busy this week with detailing jobs. Look for it within the hour.


    19. 04-28-2006 01:57 PM #19
      Alright, so the "spray-can" how-to. This is similar to the one above except that it's 1) tougher to do, 2) requires more patience, 3) has a much higher chance of being done wrong, 4) is *much* faster when done right, and 5) looks better.

      I apologize in advance for how quickly I go through this, I've been extremely busy this week. I won't be attaching many pics, but will try to explain the best I can.

      - Why do we want to use spray instead os touchup?

      It's faster and when done right it looks better. Often times touchup can't tackle larger jobs like bumper chips. example:

      On the left is where the bumper was hit by another car. The paint chipped off and continued to peel until this spot was created. It was about 4 inches by 8 inches, touchup brush paint would have taken days to fill it in and would have looked like a big ugly mess. Here is how I spray touchup:

      What you'll need:

      All the stuff from above

      A spray can with the appropriate color. I like duplicolor a lot, their colors are good matches, their paint dries fast and won't shrink, it's cheap, it's available everywhere, and the sprayer is half decent. You will also need a sprayer with clear in it if you have a clear coated paint job. If you're doing a bumper make sure to get the bumper version, as it has a flex agent in it.

      primer

      A lot of painters tape. I like the 1 inch variety for this.

      A pencil and some paper (for real)

      a stiff peice of cardboard or plastic that you can throw away later, it helps if it's 6x6 or larger.

      an exacto knide

      If the chipped area is deep (1mm or more) the paint will not fill it alone, you will need to fill it using some automotive putty. I like 3M super red putty (yes thats the name), it's highly manipulatable, dries quickly, doesn't shrink, sands down really well, and isn't expensive. It is only for small areas though (filling maybe 1/2 inch or less tops). For more you might consider bondo or another putty.

      If you're using putty - a small plastic trowel thats flexible.

      So time to start.

      Clean the area well and then sand it edges down with some 1500 or 200 grit. You don't want it to peel any more than it has. This might open the chip up considerably, so plan for this. The one above started about 4x8 but went up to maybe 6x10 after sanding. Make sure to sand down spots inside the chip well (so if there is some paint that didn't flake off inside the maint area of the chip, try to get rid of it).

      If your putty requires a base coat of any kind do it now. 3m super red doesnt, so lets fill the chip with it. This part sounds hard but it isn't. Spread the putty in the chip started from the middle, just like repairing drywall. Use the plastic trowel to manipulate it into place. Don't worry about high spots, just make sure there are no low spots - this is important. Also, dont worry about going over the edges of the chip, you'll sand it down later. The most important part is to be at or above the level of the existing paint.

      Wait overnight.

      Sand the area down using 1500 or 2000 grit, make sure its very smooth and get all excess that went over the edges. If you have any low spots re-fill then and wait another day to sand. You do not want low spots.

      When it's sanded the fun begins!

      Get your pencil and paper and put the paper over the area and trace a rough area that you'll be painting. Try to be as precise as possible as this will determine how well it blends later. mark the center of the chip with a pen on the paper.

      Cover the area with painters take, all of it and make sure you go at least 4-6 inches over the area you'll be painting (so now the painters tape is over the filled area, and 4 inches on any side). Mark the center of the chip with a pen.

      Hold the paper you drew on over the area and line up the dots you marked. Now use an excacto to cut out the diagram in the paper while simultaneously cutting the painters tape (lightly, dont go all the way through).

      When you're done peel the tape away over the chip. How well you did this will determine how nice the area comes out.

      Prime the area using a spray on primer. I use the cardboard/plastic to follow the spray can do no overspray gets on the car. Spray lightly (really, really lightly) and keep to the directions (if the can says stay 4 inches away, do it), a run is a bad thing.

      If this works wait till it dries. If you get a rud wait till it dries, sand the run and re-prime.

      Get your colored spray and spray. Same deal, follow instructions and spray lightly. You'll be doing at least 2 coats, maybe 3. SPRAY LIGHTLY, if you spray too much you'll have a ridge when you pullt he tape off and it'll look like ass.

      wait till it dries, remember between coats you want to wait till it dries, but not all the way, you want ti spray again when its tacky.

      clear the area using the same technique. if i didnt get it through to you before, SPRAY LIGHTLY!!!!!!!!! too much = too much gloss = everyone who looks at it going "hm, what happened there?" =

      I do two clear coats unless it's too glossy after one.

      When it's dry remove the tape and access. 9/10 times if done right you will not be able to see the touchup, however even so I like to do the following just to blend it all in.

      wetsand per the above instructions (first post)

      compound per above instructions

      Now, in cases where the surrounding paint is in good shape this should leave you with a 100% perfect match. In cases like the bumper above the rear bumper was kind of chipped, so it was visible if you looked for it just by virtue of it having no chips. Over time it will fade to look more like the surrounding area.

      Questions? Let me know. I went through this quick so I may have missed something obvious.


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      05-01-2006 11:04 AM #20
      Good write up, it makes sense and I think hits all the points. I will most likely try this next week.

      What do you suggest to do if you get a "ridge" from the new paint? I am usually good at this but sometimes get a ridge and since I put such a light coat on when wetsanding to blend it I usually end up taking off too much material and can see the primer.

      Thanks and again, great write-up


    21. 05-01-2006 12:03 PM #21
      It's tough to get rid of a ridge or paint line. I normally try to sand around the ridge with 3000 grit, then polish, sand, polish..etc, until it looks reasonable. I've also taped off around the ridge and given one spray to kind of blend the area in, but this can just lead to a snowball effect of ridges, so you have to be careful. Often times you have to suck it up and leave it alone or you'll go through the paint. I hate having to do this, but I've found that the new paint fades down to match within a couple weeks.

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      05-01-2006 03:44 PM #22
      Thanks man

    23. 05-03-2006 02:10 AM #23
      Good write-up, thank you. This will motivate us nervous types that procrastinate.

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      05-05-2006 03:44 PM #24
      what about a chip that is on the fender lip? It is on the angle of it but it is like 3mm nothing big but annoying to me. I just don't want it to spread.

      Is it possible to touch it up?

      Good write ups OP!


    25. 05-05-2006 07:12 PM #25
      You may want to just touch that up and then leave it (just be really careful when touching it up so it isn't conspicuous), or try some langka on it. It's kind of difficult to sand on lips and body lines because the paint is normally a little thinner, and it's hard to keep it flat. You can definitely try, just be really cautious. I have chips in door jambs and on lips that I've just touched up and left alone.

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      07-06-2006 04:23 PM #26

    27. Member Golf20V's Avatar
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      07-06-2006 07:05 PM #27
      Quote, originally posted by Royale5 »

      Thanks for bumping this. I hadn't seen it. Nice write up. It'll come in handy when I have to make some repairs to my wife's Jetta. Darn black cars

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      07-07-2006 01:17 AM #28
      Quote, originally posted by ritchic »
      Please do and again very nice work. i will be atempting this next week on my bumper I'll let you know how it goes

      sweet


      Modified by JrodVW at 1:19 AM 7-7-2006


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      04-09-2008 04:02 PM #29
      Very nice, this will come in handy on my Jeep which is always getting new scratches

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      04-09-2008 08:17 PM #30
      it should be noted for anyone attempting repair on their cars, solid colors are always easier to match. metallics will always have a different flake, or flop. even if the color is spot on, there will be a perceptible difference. on a chip, this is less obvious though.

    31. 04-19-2008 11:51 PM #31
      Quote, originally posted by thegoodson »
      it should be noted for anyone attempting repair on their cars, solid colors are always easier to match. metallics will always have a different flake, or flop. even if the color is spot on, there will be a perceptible difference. on a chip, this is less obvious though.

      I agree for the most part. For resprays it is exceedingly difficult to match a metallic or pearl. For a chip smaller than a dime it usually isn't nearly as difficult, probably due to the size.


    32. 07-27-2008 01:43 AM #32
      Hi picus,

      I have a small scratch on the rear bumper on my '08 GTI. Your instructions would be perfect if not for a small problem: the scratch had also deformed the urethane (i.e. a tiny mountain at where the scratch is). My question is: is it possible to use rougher sand paper to smooth that out first before following your instructions? If so, what should I watch out for? If not, what's the next best thing to do?

      By the way, do you provide this service?

      Thanks!


      p.s. The scratch is 1 cm long by 1-2 mm wide, right atop bend where the rear bumper dips inward for the place for the license plate ('08 GTI).


    33. 07-27-2008 10:24 AM #33
      Quote, originally posted by picus »
      Thanks guys.


      Great DIY, though this is not an SI, he just put those emblems on. This is a civic LX, EX, or EX special edition. Trust me the SI does not look like that and does not say Vtech or SI down on that corner. But besides that, great job!!!!!!


    34. 07-28-2008 05:46 PM #34
      this is awesome!
      1.8T never lose... 2.0 never win - Avus

      Enzodude.com
      there will always be a place for Enzodude

    35. 07-29-2008 08:34 AM #35
      mark3bluegolf - I'm in Canada. In Canada the US EX is an Si. The car pictured above is a Canadian Si.

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