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    Thread: DIY - Replacing fuel injectors on a MKIV 12v VR6

    1. 12-12-2006 06:05 PM #1
      REPLACING FUEL INJECTORS ON A MKIV 12V VR6

      The following procedure describes how to remove (and replace) the fuel injectors on a MKIV 12v VR6, one of which is shown below.


      Poorly operating injectors can cause decreased gas mileage, rough idle, decreased engine power, engine surging and increased emissions. Sometimes the CEL will even come on, causing you to fail an OBDII emissions test. I removed my injectors because the fuel trim values reported by VAG-COM indicated that my engine was running close to 10% lean at elevated engine speeds (10% is the limit for triggering a CEL). Since the injectors had more than 216k miles on them, it was possible that the injectors had become clogged by fuel deposits over time and the ECU was compensating for the decreased flow rate by increasing the injector pulse duration. I sent the removed injectors to WitchHunter Performance for ultrasonic cleaning and replacement of filter baskets and o-rings. The results of this cleaning procedure are documented HERE.

      The procedure below is based on a '99.5 Jetta GLS VR6, but should be applicable to all MKIV VR6s and similar on many later model VWs.

      The following items are required to perform the procedure:

      - Small screwdriver
      - 5mm hex wrench or socket
      - Spring clip pliers (regular pliers will work fine)
      - Two rods ~ 5/16" in diameter, if you want to plug the fuel lines (I used a screwdriver and 1/4" socket extension)
      - Roll of wide tape


      REMOVING THE INJECTORS:

      1. Open the driver's door and pop open the door that covers the fuse panel, as shown below.


      2. Remove the fuse for the fuel pump (#28), indicated by the red arrow in the picture below.


      3. Start the engine and let it stall out. This will remove the pressure from inside the fuel lines so that you won't get sprayed in the face with gas later on.

      4. Loosen the gas cap to vent any residual pressure. This step may not be necessary, but it can't hurt.

      5. Remove the engine covers and upper intake manifold from the top of the engine by following the appropriate steps in this DIY by FaelinGL (Mike).

      6. The injectors are located on top of the lower intake manifold, as indicated by the red arrows in the picture below.


      7. Before proceeding, cover the holes in the lower intake manifold with some tape (red arrow) if you haven't already.


      8. The wires for the fuel injectors (as well as the rear knock sensor) are contained in a support (yellow arrow in picture below) that is attached to the fuel rail (green arrow) in three places (blue arrows). Before removing the support, there are 6 retaining clips (red arrows) that first need to be popped open in order to remove the wiring.


      9. The picture below shows the clip that secures the wiring for the #3 and #4 cylinder injectors. To pop open this and the other five clips, use a small screwdriver placed in the slots indicated by red arrows to gently pry them open. The yellow arrows in the picture show how the support is attached to the fuel rail (it's simply clipped on to both tubes).


      10. The picture below shows how the individual wires for injector #1 (rred arrow) and injector #2 (yellow arrow) are secured below their retaining clip.


      11. Once all of the retaining clips are open, carefully remove the wiring from the support, unclip the support from the fuel rail and manuever the support out from around the wiring. The picture below shows the support removed.


      12. The following three pictures show how the injectors are oriented in the lower manifold. Their orientation is important since the upper manifold sits just above the injector harnesses and you want to avoid any interference. The injectors for odd numbered cylinders are oriented so that the electrical harness is roughly straight up, while the injectors for the even numbered cylinders are rotated approximately 45° counter-clockwise (towards the passenger's side). The injector for cylinder #1 is rotated slightly clockwise (towards the drvier's side) so that there is no interference with the wiring support when installed.


      13. Remove the electrical harneses from all six injectors by pressing in on the two retaining clips (red arrows in picture below) and then pulling up on the harness (yellow arrow).


      14. Work the wiring and harnesses for the six injectors out from underneath the fuel rail.

      15. Disconnect the wiring for the rear knock sensor from the top of the valve cover. The two retaining clips, indicated by the red arrows in the picture below, should easily lift up out of their holes in the valve cover. You shouldn't need to undo the wiring from the wiring clips, but can if the clips so not easily come out of the cover.


      16. Pull the vacuum line T-fitting off of the fuel pressure regulator on the fuel rail, as shown below.


      17. Move the injector and knock sensor wiring out of the way (red arrow in picture below).


      18. Unclip the flexible fuel lines from their retaining clips (red arrows in picture below) by placing a small screwdriver in the groove at the top of each clip (yellow arrow) and carefully prying it open. The left clip in the photo has already been opened.


      19. Unclamp and remove the fuel lines from the fuel rail, as shown in the picture below. Use a rag or paper towel to catch the small amount of gas that will come out. Also, note the position of the clamps on the hoses before removing the clamps. The clamps should be put back in the same position so that the tabs won't sit underneath the upper manifold when it's reinstalled. This is just a guess, but you probably don't want to have to take the manifold back off to work on the fuel lines if need be at a later date.


      20. If the car is going to sit for a while for whatever reason, then I recommend that you plug the fuel lines, as shown in the picture below. Mine sat for a week and a half while I was on vacation and the injectors were shipped out for cleaning and I didn't want the garage filling up with gas fumes. If you're reinstalling injectors immediately after removing them, then this step is not necessary.


      21. Pop off the clips that secure the injectors to the fuel rail (red arrows in picture below) by pulling straight up on them. They're "springy" and should pop off easily.


      22. The picture below shows one of the clips partially removed. Note the slots in the side of the clip where the flange on the fuel rail fitting sits.


      23. The picture below shows one of the retaining clips completely removed.


      24. The picture below shows the proper depth of the injector in the fuel rail fitting. The retaining clip slides into the groove in the injector (red arrow) and around the flange on the fuel rail fitting. Note that when the injector is sitting in the fuel rail fitting at the proper depth, the distance between the flange and groove is appoximately equal to the width of the groove.


      25. The fuel rail is secured to the lower manifold by four 5mm hex bolts in locations indicated by the red arrows in the picture below.


      26. The picture below shows a close-up of one of the fuel rail bolts. Remove all four of these bolts.


      27. Carefully pull the fuel rail off of the injectors by pulling a little at a time at various points along the length of the rail, as shown in the picture below. The o-rings secure the injectors into the rail pretty good, so you may need to give it a good tug. Just don't pull so hard as not to bend the fuel rail. It doesn't matter if the injectors stay in the manifold or come out with the fuel rail. All of my injectors stayed in the manifold, but some were loose and close to coming out with the rail.


      28. Carefully wiggle/rotate the injectors out of the manifold. You can use the harness on the injector for a little bit of leverage, but don't put too much pressure on it or it could possibly break off. The injectors should come out eventually with gentle wigging/rotation so don't get impatient if it seems like they're completely stuck. Most likely they're not.


      29. Check the fuel rail fittings for any o-rings that might have popped off the injectors and remained in the fittings.


      30. Also check the holes in the lower manifold for any o-rings that might be present. Note: If you look into the injector holes in the lower manifold for the front (even) cylinders, you should be able to see the intake valve for each cylinder (green arrow). Mine showed very little deposit on the valve even after 216k miles!


      31. If the car is going to sit for a while, cover the injector holes in the lower manifold with tape so that nothing falls in.






      REINSTALLING THE INJECTORS:

      The reinstallation of the injectors is done by simply following the above steps in reverse. Here are some simple tips which should help make the process easier:

      - Apply some gas or a small bit of clean oil to the injector o-rings before pushing the injector into the manifold or fuel rail. They'll go in much easier this way.

      - Figuring out how far the injectors should be pressed into the manifold and fuel rail can be a trial-and-error process. I recommend fitting the injectors into the manifold first and then pressing the fuel rail on. Use the picture in Step #24 to gauge if the injector is positioned properly. If it isn't, move the injector in the appropriate direction so that the flange and groove look like they do in the picture. When the groove and flange are related this way, then the injector clips will slide on very easily. Since the fuel rail is bolted a specific distance away from the manifold, you only need to correctly position the fuel rail end of the injector. The manifold end of the injector will be positioned in the manifold accordingly.

      - Torque the fuel rail bolts to 7 ft-lbs if you have a torque wrench.

      - Don't forget to reinstall Fuse #28 or the car won't start.

      Congrats on a job well done. Have a or two.


      As always, do this procedure at your own risk. I am not responsible for any mistakes in the above procedure or those that you make while performing it.


    2. 12-12-2006 07:25 PM #2
      What can I say !! Gary strikes again

      Next time do a headgasket procedure


    3. 12-12-2006 10:23 PM #3
      What a great writeup!

    4. 12-12-2006 11:16 PM #4
      you do an awesome job on these tutorial things!

    5. 12-12-2006 11:42 PM #5
      Thanks.

    6. Member VDFOSHO's Avatar
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      12-13-2006 12:06 AM #6
      nice write up.

    7. 12-13-2006 12:08 AM #7
      the man!

    8. 12-13-2006 10:06 AM #8
      Morning bump.

    9. Member RavinJetta's Avatar
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      12-13-2006 12:31 PM #9
      Great writeup Gary

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      12-13-2006 12:58 PM #10
      EXCELLENT DIY. I know I need to do this badly, with my aging 12V.

      Mike

      Chapter 11 Dubs: Member #001
      http://www.chapter11dubs.com
      -----------------------

    11. 12-13-2006 01:11 PM #11
      Nice diy I was going to do this to my buddies VR this week. Thanks

    12. Member
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      12-15-2006 01:59 AM #12
      Thank you for sharing. once again, Herr Docktor Gary!!

    13. 12-15-2006 02:18 AM #13
      If only VF Engineering would hire you to write their manuals...I had to do this blind.

      Nice Work...AGAIN! you have saved me countless hours when working on my car


      Modified by darkVR6 at 11:27 PM 12-14-2006


    14. 12-15-2006 07:28 AM #14
      Quote, originally posted by darkVR6 »
      If only VF Engineering would hire you to write their manuals...I had to do this blind.

      Nice Work...AGAIN! you have saved me countless hours when working on my car


      Modified by darkVR6 at 11:27 PM 12-14-2006


      Tell them to send me parts. I'll install them and write their manuals.


    15. 04-12-2007 10:29 PM #15
      great write up! thanks again! keep going man! waiting for more of your DIY!

    16. Member kevwithoutacorrado's Avatar
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      04-13-2007 05:53 PM #16
      Another boring, uninformative, vague and hard to follow DIY post without enough photos from VgRt6


    17. Member CorvetteKillerVr6's Avatar
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      05-27-2008 11:01 AM #17
      vague and informative????
      really.....
      this is one of the coolest diy's yet.


    18. Member jdubb531's Avatar
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      11-28-2008 12:45 AM #18
      my car gets pretty bad gas mileage (200 city miles a tank) and my friend gets like 260ish..we drive the same..his car has better throttle response and im running a little rich..could this be my injectors? and also i probably need my tb cleaned..any suggestions?


    19. Member kevwithoutacorrado's Avatar
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      08-09-2009 12:49 AM #19
      Quote, originally posted by CorvetteKillerVr6 »
      vague and informative????
      really.....
      this is one of the coolest diy's yet.


      hahaha

      I was searching for injector information today and found this post. can't believe someone thought I was serious! the was for real - ha


    20. 05-01-2010 02:45 PM #20
      Thank YOU!

      I now feel comfortable doing this job myself,wouldnt have otherwise.Cant thank you enough!


    21. 04-21-2011 04:03 PM #21
      Hey thanks for the guide. I followed it completely and replaced one of the injectors on my brother's 2001 VR6 and the car started up fine when I was done, but now the EPC light is on. I was wondering if I should reset the computer and drive it around a bit or if there is actually something that needs to be fixed. Thanks

    22. 05-17-2011 10:47 AM #22
      thinking I am going to need to do this to see if it fixes my 6 cylinder misfire. I have tried everything else I hope this does the trick... Anyone know where I can get a vr6 injector for a decent price? Seem some for like 185 but damn LOL...

    23. Member odawg753's Avatar
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      08-24-2011 09:56 PM #23
      hey i just did mine and im laking gas,probly the old o ring on the old ones right? but im getting new ones is there a way to test them to see if they are leaking with out putting the manifold back on and starting the engine??

      thank you!
      mike

    24. Member jark99's Avatar
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      05-31-2012 12:39 PM #24
      Have a question!
      in this picture below. which line is the send and receiving lines? is the top line the one that sends the fuel to the injectors? I need to know cause i may have some blockage somewhere. Thanks!
      Quote Originally Posted by munkittrick View Post
      you'll never really appreciate a VR until you've seen what kind of engineering went into getting a 6-cylinder jammed into that bathtub that we call our engine bay.

    25. Member jark99's Avatar
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      06-01-2012 07:41 AM #25
      Quote Originally Posted by jark99 View Post
      Have a question!
      in this picture below. which line is the send and receiving lines? is the top line the one that sends the fuel to the injectors? I need to know cause i may have some blockage somewhere. Thanks!
      Anyone???

      Sent from my Nexus S using Tapatalk 2
      Quote Originally Posted by munkittrick View Post
      you'll never really appreciate a VR until you've seen what kind of engineering went into getting a 6-cylinder jammed into that bathtub that we call our engine bay.

    26. Member BornBlue82's Avatar
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      07-05-2012 12:49 PM #26
      Once again Gary, Thanks for this great write-up. Cheers!!

    27. Member Ultramagnus0001's Avatar
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      09-24-2012 09:32 PM #27
      I would recommend using a thick rubber hose around the metal part, then use a pair of pliers over the hose, then start twisting and pulling gently. It gives you more leverage and you wont risk the chance of breaking the connectors, because they are just on there by 2 tiny wires like a speaker coil and being held in place by the orange plastic c-clip looking thingy. The connector WILL break easily, guess how I found out.
      Last edited by Ultramagnus0001; 09-26-2012 at 02:10 AM.
      You can get a smooth, quiet, floaty car and fall asleep waiting to get from point A to B, or enjoy getting there.
      To be good at racing, you have to change your name to Sebastien.

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