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    Thread: The "Official" Golf / Jetta MK3 Forum FAQ

    1. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 06:31 PM #176
      Quote, originally posted by 2.slow_GTi »
      Lets see. Your gonna need some 320 and 600 grit sand paper. Some Sandable primer. The color of your choice. Some clear sealant.

      http://www.fototime.com/ftweb/...83333

      Start by cleaning the wheel. The better you prep the better the results.
      http://www.fototime.com/ftweb/...28935

      sand down the arean you want to paint with the 320 grit sand paper. you may need to start with something rougher if your wheels are in bad shape.
      http://www.fototime.com/ftweb/...03125

      mask off the area you don't want to paint (obviously)
      http://www.fototime.com/ftweb/...91435

      Prime the metal using thin even coats. Remember with spray cans thin even coats work better than thick heavy coats. Sand the primer after your done so the finish is as smoth as possible.
      http://www.fototime.com/ftweb/...23032

      Paint the wheels, again using thin even coats.
      http://www.fototime.com/ftweb/...32292

      Wait 3-5 days for full drying as per the instructions on the can of paint.
      The paint will darken as it drys. When it's dry get the clear sealant and again use even thin coats for best results.
      http://www.fototime.com/ftweb/...26736

      final results
      http://www.fototime.com/ftweb/...36111

      hope it useful. later.




      Modified by nater at 8:28 AM 3-2-2008

    2. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 06:40 PM #177
      Quote, originally posted by chipmunkpie »
      if you're trying to get your grilles out of the dashboard air vents cut a piece of coat hanger with a "U" shape on one end. hook it around one of the horizontal slats all the way to one side and pull until it pops free. do the same on the other side. it might help to point the vent all the way up too. i figured this out after breaking a few of the little tabs on the back.

      if you want to clean the years of gunk off while they're out let them soak in hot water with some dish soap. rinse and repeat or use a toothbrush (roommate's, younger sibling's, cheating g/f b/f... ) to loosen the rest of it.

      enjoy your clean vents!


    3. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 06:44 PM #178
      Quote, originally posted by AaronD »

      FK POWERLOOK ANGEL EYE WIRING

      Well since, pretty much no one can ever figure the stupid wiring out on the FK powerlooks for the angel eyes, Ive decided to make up a quick pic post that will hopefully help some people out....as far as the initial wiring, follw the instructions as the paper says....

      this is the passenger side light...as you can see, you will have a wire with a clip on it, just kinda hanging....thats okay....you do not need that wire, so just leave it....the other wire that im holding, runs into the wire loom and runs to the drivers side headlight....
      http://www.pifiu.com/upload/up...2.JPG

      now asuming that you have followed all of the wiring instructions thus far, you should have no problem figring out the little control module thingy, basically just hook it up to the battery and the proper wires as told...
      http://www.pifiu.com/upload/up...3.JPG

      now this is where evryone gets confused....how the hell do i make the angel eyes light up? well theres a few options...

      option #1- I want my angel eyes on ALL of the time no matter what! as DRLs and also to stay on with the headlights...

      this is how to complete option #1- you can either tap into the wire show in the pic below (the grey wire that plugs into the red one) or you can tap into the harness as ive shown in the second pic...(were working on the drivers side now)
      http://www.pifiu.com/upload/up...4.JPG
      here you can see i used a wire connector to tap into the harness...when you look at the harness, the gray wire goes in one end, but nothing comes out the other end...this is where you can tap your wire in....
      http://www.pifiu.com/upload/up...8.JPG

      from here, you run the wire that you tapped in (either by method 1 or 2) to your SIDE marker light, NOT your front blinker....there are 2 wires on the side marker...an orange/brown one and a white one with a black stripe...you want to tap into the wite/black striped one... as shown here..sorry for clarity, you get the idea
      http://www.pifiu.com/upload/up...5.jpg

      now your angel eyes should light up and stay on as DRL's and also stay on when you turn your headlights on..

      Option #2- I want my angel eyes on as DRL's but NOT on with my headlights..

      this is how to fufill option #2...

      follow all of the instructions above to the last step...INSTEAD of tapping into your side marker you are going to run the wire (that you tapped into the gray/red wire) through the firewall inside the car...

      remove all of the plastic to reveal the fuse box and to give you some room to work...now looking at the fuse box, look beyond it, past the back of it and you will see a ton of wires...locate a yellow wire, it will have a yellow clip in the middle of it (hence clipping itself into itself), its easy to locate.

      Once you find that wire, unclip that yellow clip (from itself) and tap your angel eye wire that you ran inside, right into the end of the clip. IIRC it will be the end that runs toward the steering wheel, not the end that runs outside...you may have to do a quick trial and error.

      once your tapped into there, your angel eyes will be on as DRL's but go off when you turn on your headlights.

      Hope this helped some of you...and if you need more wire combo's well...be creative cause thats all i got for ya....happy powerlooking!
      http://www.pifiu.com/upload/up...4.JPG




      Modified by nater at 8:30 AM 3-2-2008

    4. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 06:53 PM #179
      Quote, originally posted by nappent »
      Ok for all of us with the crappy stock keyless entry with the 10ft range here is a mod for you.

      I can honestly say if you do this mod your range could be up to 100ft. Check it out at my site...
      http://myvr6.org/page/1hfl5/DI....html

      More picture and better instructions then what you might have seen before.


      http://www.we-todd-did-racing....D.jpg

      Don't let the pic fool you. I'm at least 60 feet away. I'm actually on the other end of my street. Very cool isn't it? Look at the blinkers they are flashing because I'm unlocking it from 60+ ft away.

      **I would say this is a must try mod**


      Modified by nater at 12:02 PM 3-2-2008


      Modified by nater at 1:26 PM 10-13-2008


    5. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 07:07 PM #180
      Quote, originally posted by EuroVR6Mk3 »

      euro front rebar on NA radiator support




      Modified by nater at 12:08 PM 3-2-2008

    6. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 07:11 PM #181
      Quote, originally posted by an anonymous party »
      If your Heater core goes out on you, and you get coolant fumes in the face, flooded car etc, before you start to pull the dash and get suicidal, call the 1800 VWoA Customer Service line, file a case, and see what they can do. You'd be amazed. I just got mine covered 100%, so its worth a shot.



      Modified by nater at 8:26 PM 10-20-2007

    7. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 07:18 PM #182
      Quote, originally posted by AaronD »
      those hard wiring aftermarket radios

      this is for those of us who are too cheap to buy an adapter and want to hardwire aftermarket radios in our cars. if you dont have a bentley it could be hard to figure out the colors etc....heres a chart for you

      this is from my premium vw deck....think its the same for deluxe. these wires are all from #2 and #3 clip...#1 was not used on my radio...
      LEFT side is VW---RIGHT side is aftermarket color

      lt. blu/grn stripe---violet rt. rear +
      brwn/pnk stripe---violet/blk stripe rt. rear -
      red/white stripe---gray rt. frnt +
      brwn/white stripe---gray/black stripe rt. front -
      blu/blk stripe---white lft front +
      brwn/blu stripe---white/blk stripe lft front -
      red/grn stripe---green lft rear +
      brwn/blk stripe---green/blk stripe lft rear -

      brwn/white stripe---Alarm sys control mod.
      brwn/pink stripe---ignition
      gray/blu stripe---radio illumination
      red/white stripe---battery +
      brown---black ground


    8. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 07:26 PM #183
      Quote, originally posted by punkassjim »
      I've been seeing it in a lot of threads lately, so I figured I'd post this little tip:

      The main reason for people's reverse gears getting chipped (clicking noise when backing up) is because people shift into and out of reverse while still rolling. If you're rolling forward and you shift into reverse, you'll hear a CLUNK! If you take it out of reverse while still rolling backward, you'll sometimes hear a slight clicking as the teeth are disengaging.

      Take care to come to a complete stop before engaging or disengaging reverse. Your tranny will thank you for it. The dealer who sold me my car said they get at least a couple VWs in per month with chipped reverse idler gears. Take care, and it won't happen to you.


    9. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 07:34 PM #184
      Quote, originally posted by Air_Cooled_Nut »
      -Consult your Bentley or Haynes shop manual as necessary.
      -Remove the knee pad below the steering wheel, drop the fuse/relay board down (out of it's hanger). This allows you to reach up into the dash.
      -(Optional)Remove the head light switch and trim (or air bag idiot light) to the left if necessary to allow more light and see things better.
      -Remove BOTH plugs (T10 and T6) from the stock alarm module. These will NOT be replaced, they stay unplugged.
      -On the T6 plug, jumper the #5 and #6 slots. The T6 plug is numbered like so (facing plug):

      2 | | 1
      4 | | 3
      6 | | 5

      -If you are using wire, make sure it is at least 10-gage. You could probably get away with a smaller gage wire, like 12, but I wouldn't recommend it.
      -Make sure the jumper is adequately insulated (for example, wrapped in electrical tape).
      -Except for the two plugs you disconnected, put everything back together.
      -That's it!

      You need the T10 plug disconnected otherwise the alarm module clicks (internal relay I assume). This modification will NOT affect the central locking system for cars that DO NOT have keyless entry. If your car has keyless entry I cannot confirm nor deny that this may or may not affect your keyless entry system (I'm guessing that it won't affect it but don't quote me on that!).


    10. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 07:37 PM #185
      Quote, originally posted by DonL »
      Some tips for doing an automatic to manual transmission conversion:

      ... I just got done doing this on my brother's Passat a few weeks ago so some points may differ. It's essentially the same, though.

      It's best to find a donor car at a salvage yard rather than run around chasing down different parts from different sources. If you can get all the parts from one place, do it. It's can be a major PITA otherwise.

      Regardless, your profile lists a GL, so I'm assuming 4-cyl. VR6s are a different animal and more complicated):
      - trans
      - mounts and brackets with all linkage
      - shifter, shifter box, and interior console trim pieces
      - pedal assembly
      - manual trans ECU
      - starter
      - clutch, pressure plate, flywheel
      - Bentley manual (trust me on this one, too)

      I'm not going to go step by step here, but essentially, strip out everything that has to do with the automatic, like listed above. Assembly is the reverse of disassembly. A few things to keep in mind:

      - We thought the pedal assembly was going to be the biggest PITA of the whole job, that we'd have to strip the whole dash out, etc. We didn't. With the kneebar as as much stripped out from underneath as possible, it's possible to unbolt the pedal assembly, pull it up "alongside" the steering column, and rotate it out from underneath the dash. You'll wrestle with it, but it wasn't that bad. Don't forget the two bolts on the bottom of the bracket underneath the carpet.

      - The manual and auto trans cars do seem to have different ECUs, at least this one did. The AT car's engine ECU, from what we could determine, is set up to integrate with the transmission ECU. Unless the ECU took a static hit during the swap and needed to be replaced, the car started and idled, but drivability was absolute crap.

      - You'll have to bypass the starter interlock circuit, which is built into the ignition wiring of AT cars. Comparing the MkIII Bentley with what I recall from the Passat, there's a 6-pin connector on the trans. I think, but don't hold me to this, you have to jump from the black/blue wire to the red/black. I'm comparing park/neutral relay schematics, and the Passat had different wiring, so I'm looking at the location-to-location wiring colors.

      - To swap the linkage, you'll have to drop the front end of the exhaust and remove the heat shield tin from the underside of the tunnel to gain access from the bottom.

      - The cable pass-thru hole in the firewall is there, but blocked with a plastic plug. Pop it out and you should be good to go. You may have to trim some of the heat-isolating material from the firewall to get a clean fit for the cable, but it shouldn't be any big deal.

      - Follow the Bentley as much as you can. Things like the pedal assembly shouldn't be as critical, but the engine compartment work should be done carefully and thoroughly, so make sure you don't miss any important steps.

      - Some of the bolts are much more easily removed with an impact wrench, such as the torque converter and the drive plate. If you have access to a compressor, I highly recommend it. You can jam any rotation with breaker bars and sockets and get by, but the effort and time becomes very frustrating.

      Once you get all the crap-o-matic stuff off of the car, and the pedals and linkage installed, the rest is essentially like doing a clutch job. Replace any and all the seals you can while you have everything apart.

      Drive your car and have more actual control of it.


    11. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 07:40 PM #186
      Quote, originally posted by neildorin »
      For all of you who want to know how to reground your 12V engine here you go:

      Ok, time to put an end to all these pesky question about where to hook the grounding wires up to and if you should buy a kit or not.

      DO NOT buy a kit. Unless you're buying it from other 'texers who have fitted it to your engine don't bother or you'll have tons of excess wire in your engine bay that will just clutter it up. It's also much cheaper to just go to your local car audio retailer and pick the stuff up.

      Here's my DIY for the 12V guys (2.0l is very similar, just use a bit of inginuity if the points differ...)

      Ok stuff needed: (total cost if you buy the stuff at full retail and don't get it at cost like me ~$55c dn or $41 USD. You should easily be able to get it cheaper)

      1. 9-12 ft of 4awg grounding wire (I used Scosche EFX2 brown wire $3.00cdn/ft retail)
      2. 10 gold 4awg ring connectors ($2.00cdn per)
      3. BIG pliers for crimping
      4. Knife for stripping insulation
      4. Soldering iron and solder if you wish (I soldered one, but it was a pain, the solder doesn't adhere to the gold terminals very well and if you crimp right, those connecters are never coming off)
      5. Ratchet with extension and various sockets (10mm, 13mm)
      6. 5mm allen wrench

      First off, do yourself a favor and disconnect the negative battery terminal so as not to incidentally kill yourself.

      I measured the wires one by one. I would crimp one connector on the end of the length of bulk wire i had, attach it to the point I was mounting to loosely and run the wire where I wanted till I had an approximate idea of length. Then leave a couple extra inches of play and mark the wire. I would then detach the other end and cut the wire and crimp on the second connector.

      As a start, here's a pic of the engine bay AFTER all the wires were installed showing the general area of all the mounting points. Note how you can't actually see ANY wires in this pic. If you do this mod right, it's next to invisible (unless you use some neon friggin wire or some ungodly color that doesn't belong in your engine bay...
      http://members.shaw.ca/neildor...1.jpg

      Point 1: Chassis/Unibody
      I used a bolt under the drivers headlight on the unibody. You can't actually see the bolt in the picture, but if you look down there, you can't miss it. 10mm socket does the trick, although there's not much room for the ratchet down there. The other end of this wire goes up to the negative battery terminal (Point 2)
      http://members.shaw.ca/neildor...2.jpg

      Point 2: Negative battery terminal
      This one's fairly straight forward. I would reccomend attaching to the second threaded post rather than the one I used, but I didn't have a matching bolt handy, when I pick one up I'll change it. (10mm socket)
      http://members.shaw.ca/neildor...3.jpg

      Point 3: Central point on head/block
      I used the head as the central grounding point because the point I used on the tranny is a bolt that goes through into the block. On my car, I was lucky and had two open threaded holes on the back of the head on the drivers side of the exhaust manifold. I picked up a 20mm M6 1.00pitch 5mm allen bolt from the local hardware store to attach the 3 wires. This is where you attach one wire from the neg battery terminal, one wire from the neg. tranny ground and one wire from the throttle body.
      http://members.shaw.ca/neildor...4.jpg

      Point 4: Negative transmission ground
      This one is dead easy to find, but a PITA to get at. Follow the stock ground wire from the battery terminal to a bolt on the tranny (13 mm socket plus extension to get at this one). It's right below the lower radiator hose and the distributor block. The other end of this wire goes to the central point on the head (Point 3)
      http://members.shaw.ca/neildor...5.jpg

      Point 5: Throttle body
      I used one of the bolts that attaches the throttle body to the intake manifold (5mm allen key). I may try a different bolt later if this one becomes a probelm. I'm not sure it will, but as you can see in the pic, it's the bolt directly above where the throttle cable mechanism is. I tightened it enough that the wires don't interfere with the mechanism at all, and even if the bolt loosens they don't but I want to make sure. If you find a better place, use it and let me know! One wire attaches here from the central point (Point 3) and one goes to the last point on the chassis (Point 6)
      http://members.shaw.ca/neildor...6.jpg

      Point 6: Chassis
      This point may vary from car to car, but the easiest bolt for me to get at was the one right above the A/C expansion valve (10 mm socket plus extension). The other end of this wire goes to the throttle body (Point 5)
      http://members.shaw.ca/neildor...7.jpg

      As far as what I've noticed. The first time I started the car afterwards it was dark and my instrument lights and dome light were considerably brighter than normal. My headlights were surprisingly brighter (significantly so) considering I have stock single chamber golf lights. I took the car out for a spin and throttle response did seem to be improved as well as power in the high rpms (5000+) but it's hard to tell without a dyno. Radio reception and noise is MUCH better and cleaner. For the $ spent, I think it's without question the most effective mod I've done to date

      As usual the typical DIY disclaimer applies. These are guidelines. I am in no way responsible for any mishap or misfortune that may result from following these instructions. If you manage to blow up your car I WILL laugh and point. Please use your discretion and be safe people. DISCONNECT THE NEG. BATTERY TERMINAL WHILE MESSING WITH ELECTRONICS.




      Modified by nater at 12:10 PM 3-2-2008

    12. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 07:45 PM #187
      Quote, originally posted by bluejettaVR6 »
      so because i had a hard time finding paint codes for my car and such, i bet others have had the same problem, i've compiled this list of ALL available colors on the VW/AUDI 94-99 manufactured cars. These included special edition models such as the DE's and such, also include any European specialty colors such as Cactus Green, enjoy.
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LA1Z Light Sahara Sand
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LA6U Dark Teal Pearl
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LA7Y Pewter Gray
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LA9V Brilliant Black
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB5T Steel Blue
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB6T Turquoise
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB7Z Satin Silver
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC2U Sherry
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC3T Pearl Red
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC3Y Bordeaud Red
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC5P Dusty Mauve Pearl
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6P Dragon Grey
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6U Classic Green
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LD7V Platinum Grey
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LH5Y Smoke Silver Blue
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LH5Z Deep Atlantis Blue
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LK3A Paprika Red
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LK4U Ice Grey Violet
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LK4Z Bromberry
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LL5V Jamaica Aqua Blue
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LOA9 not available - 3 stage
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LP3D Flash Red
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LP6M Caribbean Teal
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3D Tornado Red
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3H Laser Red
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3Y Cerise Red
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY6P Ragusa Green
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY7P Titanium Gray
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY7T Crystal Silver
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY9B Brilliant Black
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ3N Rubin Red
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ4V Amethyst Grey
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ5N Minerva Blue
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ6P Gomera
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ6U Emerald
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      L041 Black
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      L90E Alpine White
      1994
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      R902 Artic White
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LA1Z Light Sahara Sand
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LA9V Brilliant Black
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB5T Steel Blue
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB6T Turquoise
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB7U Titanium Grey
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC3T Pearl Red
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC3Y Bordeaud Red
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC5C Aqua Blue
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC5P Dusty Mauve Pearl
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6P Dragon Grey
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6U Classic Green
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LD7V Platinum Grey
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LH3D Marsala Red
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LH5Y Smoke Silver Blue
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LH5Z Deep Atlantis Blue
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG3E Red Solid
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG6R Mullberry
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG7N Bright Surf
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG7X Suede Silver
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LK4Y Violet
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LK4Z Bromberry
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LL5V Jamaica Aqua Blue
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LO41 Black
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LP3G Flash Red
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LP6M Caribbean Teal
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3D Tornado Red
      1995
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      R902 Artic White
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB9A Candy White
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC3T Pearl Red
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC4T Twilight Violet
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC5U Aqua Blue
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6P Emerald Green Mica
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6U Classic Green
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC9Z Black Magic Metallic
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG4R Soft Violet
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG5P Silk Blue
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG5Q Catalina Blue
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG6S Sequoia Green Metallic
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG7N Bright Surf
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG7X Suede Silver Metallic
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LK2Y Cinnabar
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LK7Y Storm Grey Metallic
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LN5Y Windsor Blue Metallic
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LO41 Black
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LP3G Flash Red
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3D Tornado Red
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      R902 Artic White
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY9B Brilliant Black
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      L09B not available - 3 stage
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3H Laser Red
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY7M Aluminum Silver Metallic
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ6U Emerald Mica
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3Z Autumn Red
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ5T Europa Blue Mica
      1996
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ1T Cashmere Mica
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB7Z Satin Silver Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB9A Candy White
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC3M Memory Red Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC3T Pearl Red
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6P Emerald Green Mica
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC9Z Black Magic Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG5R Windsor Blue Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG6S Sequoia Green Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG7X Suede Silver Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LK7Y Storm Grey Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LN5Y Windsor Blue Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3D Tornado Red
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LO41 Black
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      L09B not available - 3 stage
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY1B Brilliant Yellow
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY1Z Bamboo Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3H Laser Red
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3D Tornado Red
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3Z Autumn Red Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY4N Byzanz Mica
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY5T Pelican Blue Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY6L Tropic Green Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY6M Aqua Green Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY7M Aluminum Silver Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY9B Brilliant Black
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY9G Casablanca White
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ1T Cashmere Mica
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ3N Rubin Red Metallic
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ4V Amethyst Grey Mica
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ5L Ming Blue Mica
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ5T Europa Blue Mica
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ6U Emerald Mica
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ8P Sable Brown Mica
      1997
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ9U Volcano Black Mica
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      L041 Black
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      L132 Ginster Yellow
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB3Y Colorado Red Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB6N Elegant Green Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB7Z Satin Silver Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB9A Candy White
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC3L Hot Chili Red Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6N Royal Green Mica
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6P Emerald Green Mica
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6U Classic Green Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6V Jaspis Green Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC9Z Black Magic Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LD1B Yellow
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LD7V Silver Gray Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG3L Red
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG5U Porcelain Blue Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG6V Cyber Green Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG7X Suede Silver Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG9R Silver Arrow Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LK3A Paprika Red
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LL5Y Nebio Blue Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LL5Z Island Blue Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LN5Y Windsor Blue Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LO9B not available - 3 stage
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LR5V Fjord Blue Mica
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LW5Y Techno Blue Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LW5Z Jazz Blue Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY1B Brilliant Yellow
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY1T Melange Beige Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY1Z Bamboo Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3D Tornado Red
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3H Laser Red
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY5T Pelican Blue Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY6L Tropic Green Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY6M Aqua Green Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY7M Aluminum Silver Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY9B Brilliant Black
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY9G Casablanca White
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ1T Cashmere Mica
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ3L Hibiscus Red Mica Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ4V Amethyst Mica Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ5K Santorin Blue Mica Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ5L Europa Blue Mica
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ6H Racing Green Mica Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ6L Cactus Green Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ8N Andora Red Mica Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ8P Sable Brown Mica Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ9U Volcano Black Mica Metallic
      1998
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      R902 Artic White
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LA041/A1 Black
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LA1U/Q9 Futura Yellow Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LA27/S7 Tropic Orange Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LA9B/B7 Cool White
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB3Y/Q7 Colorado Red Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB7Z/B4 Satin Silver Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB9A/B4 Candy White
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC3X/9W not available - 3 stage
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC6M/T3 Bright Green Mica
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LC9Z/Z4 Black Magic Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LD1B/J5 Yellow
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LD7V/C1 Silver Gray
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG3L/P2 Red
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG5T/G3 Batik Blue Mica
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LGV/L9 Cyber Green Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG7V/X4 Desert Wind Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG9R/P4 Silver Arrow Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      L0B9/D4 not available - 3 stage
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LW5Y/K9 Techno Blue Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY3D/G2 Tornado Red
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ6L/E7 Artic White
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ6W/8L Cosmic Green Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ7W/1X Indigo Blue Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ7X/8X Canyon Red Mica
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ8N/2H Atlantic Blue Mica
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ9V/3A Paprika Red
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ9W/4Z not available - 3 stage
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY1B/F2 Elegant Green Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY1C/1T Hot Chili Red Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LY9B/A2 Brilliantschwarz
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ1T/Z9 Nebio Blue Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LZ7W/1X Island Blue Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LN5Y Windsor Blue Metallic
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LG5A Fjord Blue Mica
      1999
      VOLKSWAGEN / AUDI
      LB6N/N7 Jazz Blue Metallic

    13. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 10th, 2000
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      2008 Passat 4Mo 3.6L Wagon, 98 VRt, 2010 Routan/Caravan :)
      08-14-2007 07:56 PM #188
      Quote, originally posted by Jacon »
      Got my caps from 4thChiripin and today I decided to install them

      This is on my Mk3 2.0 Jetta with Bilstein Sports and H&R sports:

      tools:

      Impact wrench, 3/4 deep socket, 5/8 deep socket, spring clamps and I can't remember the rest, but those are the major ones

      With 2 guys, this took about 1 hr.

      1) remove the wheel

      2) remove the two bolts that hold the spindle to the strut:
      http://homepages.vdubaddiction...s.jpg

      3) using the impact wrench unbolt the strut from the strut mount in the strut tower (i forgot to take a pic)

      4) remove strut from the tower (it will fall out from the wheel well)
      http://homepages.vdubaddiction...n.jpg

      5) use spring clamps to clamp down springs as shown! Very Important!
      http://homepages.vdubaddiction...s.jpg

      6) use impact wrench to unbolt the nut from the top of the strut.
      http://homepages.vdubaddiction...l.jpg

      7) once the nut is off, remove the rubber stop thing (i cant remember the name ) until you see the strut bearing.
      http://homepages.vdubaddiction...g.jpg

      8) SLOWLY remove the bearing as it is fragile and also may sometimes stick. It should just pop up and off.

      9) remove the spring cap and replace it with the new one:

      (difference is spring cap size)
      http://homepages.vdubaddiction...s.jpg

      put on new cap and make sure you line up the perch with the end of the spring
      http://homepages.vdubaddiction...p.jpg

      10) INSTALL IN REVERSE ORDER OF DISSASEMBLE

      now for pics of the finished product. **Note** these pics were take IMMEDIATELY after install and the springs will settle a tad bit more after you drive around on them

      Technically, you should see a 1/2inch drop from these on a 2.0

      http://homepages.vdubaddiction...p.jpg
      http://homepages.vdubaddiction...t.jpg
      http://homepages.vdubaddiction...r.jpg

      Happy Capping




      Modified by nater at 12:12 PM 3-2-2008

    14. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      Apr 10th, 2000
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      2008 Passat 4Mo 3.6L Wagon, 98 VRt, 2010 Routan/Caravan :)
      08-14-2007 08:09 PM #189
      Quote, originally posted by TooSlow2Point0 »
      There is actually an easier way to disable the seat belt tone that goes off when you start your car.

      Open your back door and get on yours knees in a good enough position to see underneath your front seat. There is a connection between two wires, one from the floor and one from the seat (depending on if you have cloth or leather you might have to dig around the bottom of the seat to find the wires). The wire coming from the floor is longer, so follow the wire with your fingers up towards the bottom of the seat, at the end of the wire will be a plug. To replease the connection, put your fingers on both ends, press in, and pull. If you have trouble gettin your hands down under there, go find a kid, because the area is pretty tight.


    15. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      2008 Passat 4Mo 3.6L Wagon, 98 VRt, 2010 Routan/Caravan :)
      08-14-2007 08:11 PM #190
      Quote, originally posted by Red Baron Golf »
      GTI headlight 'conversion' is tres simple:

      1. First off, you need to remove your grille and stock headlights. Easy. There are 4 screws up top on the rad, then there are a couple of tabs underneath each headlight that you need to push up on to pull off the grille. The tabs at the top of the grille will likely break off if you're not careful. Heck, they'll break even if you are careful, LOL.

      2. Now there are I think 3 or 4 hex bolts to remove the headlights.

      3. Pull out your stock bulbs

      4. Look at the stock 9004 harness. There should be three wires. One will be brown, the others are yellow and white.

      5. Here is when you need to start some soldering and shrink tubing / splicing. You can either cut off the stock harness, or leave it and tap into the wires. I left mine on in case I wanted to go back to stock (unlikely) now I'm just too lazy to cut the thing off. What you need to do is tap into the brown GROUND wire, and create another ground wire. Give yourself enough length to get to the headlight! Take a look at the new 9005 bulb harness (highbeam) and 9006 harness (lowbeam). One of them will be a ground wire (can't remember which, and I'm not sure if it matters or not, I just guessed and everything worked) the other will be one of the yellow or white wires. I *think* it's yellow to the inside highbeams and whites to the outside, but I can double check if anyone wants to know.

      6. So all you need now is to wire up the yellow wire and one ground to the high beam, then the other ground wire and white wire to the low beam and make sure you solder everything, shrink tube everything, then tape it all up (I used black hockey tape, just like the OEM stuff!) and you're done. Repeat for the other side, put the lights back in, grille back in and you're done.

      7. Test everything. You'll see that when you flick the highbeams on, only the inside lights stay on. This is normal. To get the low beam to stay on with the highs, you need to build a bridge. If you have fogs, they will also go off. Here is the info on how to do the bridge:


    16. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      2008 Passat 4Mo 3.6L Wagon, 98 VRt, 2010 Routan/Caravan :)
      08-14-2007 08:18 PM #191
      Quote, originally posted by mtl_jetta_gt »
      For all you people that want to keep the stock shift knob but get rid of that ugly plastic boot.

      In first place, find a mk4 leather boot. Afterward, you need to cut down your shifter using the diy (minimum of an inch). Flip over the boot and tie it with a clip or tie wraps in the carved place at the bottom end of the shift knob. Then flip it over, screw it on the shift rod. Stretch the bottom end to fit it around and there you go, you have a stock looking shifter with a whole lot better looking boot.


    17. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      2008 Passat 4Mo 3.6L Wagon, 98 VRt, 2010 Routan/Caravan :)
      08-14-2007 08:24 PM #192
      Quote, originally posted by John Galt »
      Everything you ever wanted to know about the VR6 engine, PART 2

      *** Two-Stage Fuel Pump ***

      The two-stage pump has one motor that drives two separate pumps.

      * Stage One *

      Fuel is drawn in through a screen at the bottom of the housing
      by a vane-type pump. The vane-type pump acts as a transfer pump.
      It's designed to supply fuel to the fuel accumulator which is
      within the pump housing.

      Fuel vapors and air bubbles from fuel returning from the engine,
      as well as excessive fuel, is forced out of the accumulator through
      a fuel vent.

      * Stage Two *

      The gear-type pump draws fuel in from the bottom of the accumulator
      and through a screen. The fuel is then forced through the pump
      housing by the gear pump and out the top.

      *** Fuel Injectors ***

      The injectors are supplied 12 volts by the Power Supply Relay and
      are grounded through the Motronic ECU. They are opened sequentially
      in the cylinder firing order.

      Injection quantity is determined by the injector opening time.

      *** Fuel Tank Ventilation ***

      The following inputs are used to control the fuel tank ventilation:

      .Engine speed
      .Engine load
      .Engine coolant temperature
      .Signal from throttle valve Potentiometer (G69)

      Fuel vapors from the fuel tank are vented to the carbon canister.
      When the engine is warm and above idle speed, the vapors will be
      drawn into the intake manifold via the carbon canister.

      Depending on engine load and oxygen sensor signal, a frequency valve
      will regulate the quantity of vapors entering the intake manifold from
      the carbon canister

      * Carbon Canister Frequency Valve (N80) *

      The ECU determines the duty cycle of the frequency valve to regulate
      the flow of fuel vapors from the carbon canister to the engine.

      When no current is supplied to the valve, it remains in the open
      position.
      The valve is closed (duty cycle 100%) when the cold engine is started.

      * Triggering: *

      The Carbon Canister Frequency Valve (N80) begins to operate after
      oxygen sensor operation has begun.

      Valve operation is load- and speed-dependent during driving operation.
      The valve is completely open at full throttle and completely closed
      during deceleration fuel shut-off.

      * Substitute function: *

      If power to the valve is interrupted, the valve remains completely open.
      This could lead to rough running at idle speed and during partial load
      acceleration.

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      The ECU recognizes open circuits and short circuits in the component.

      *** Air Mass Sensor (G70) ***

      A hot-wire air mass sensor is used to measure the airflow into the
      engine. The air mass sensor is attached to the air filter housing.
      The sensor housing includes a baffle grid which reduces air turbulence
      and pulses. The sensor has no moving parts.

      A thin, electrically-heated , platinum hot-wire in the sensor is kept
      180°C (356°F) above the air temperature measured by the thin-layer
      platinum temperature sensor.

      As airflow increases, the wires are cooled and the resistance of the
      sensors changes. Current to the platinum hot-wire changes to maintain
      the constant temperature difference.

      The resulting current change is converted to a voltage signal and is
      used by the Motronic ECU to calculate the volume of air taken in.

      Dirt or other contamination on the platinum wire can cause inaccurate
      output signals. Because of this, the platinum wire is heated to 1000° C
      (1832° F) for a period of one second each time the engine is switched
      off to burn off this dirt or contamination.

      If a fault develops with the signal from the air mass sensor, the signal
      from the throttle potentiometer is used as a substitute in order for
      the car to remain derivable.

      *** Throttle Valve Potentiometer (G69) ***

      The throttle valve potentiometer is connected to the throttle valve
      shaft. It informs the ECU about the power requested by the driver.

      Idle and full load switched are not incorporated in the Throttle Valve
      Potentiometer. Idle speed and full throttle applications are recognized
      by the ECU from the voltage output of the potentiometer.

      * Signal application: *

      Throttle Valve Potentiometer signals are used for determination of idle
      speed stabilization, idle air volume control, fuel after-run shut-off
      and fuel load enrichment.

      * Substitute function: *

      The ECU uses the Air Mass Sensor signal and engine speed signal as a
      replacement variables if the Throttle Valve Potentiometer fails.

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      Self-diagnosis recognizes:

      Short circuits to positive
      Short circuits to ground

      Note: On vehicles with automatic transmission, this potentiometer is
      combined in a housing with the potentiometer for the transmission
      control.

      *** Engine Speed / Reference Sensor (G28) ***

      Engine speed and crankshaft position are registered by a single sensor
      located on the engine block.

      The sensor reads a toothed wheel mounted on the crankshaft to read
      engine speed.

      The toothed wheel has a two-tooth gap which is used as the measuring
      point for the crankshaft position.

      * Signal application: *

      The signal is used for registration of engine speed and, in conjunction
      with the signal from the Hall Sender, for recognition of ignition TDC
      in cylinder Number 1.

      * Substitute function: *

      There is no substitute functions for Speed Reference Sensor G28.

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      The ECU recognizes a missing signal from the Speed/Reference Sensor
      after cranking the engine for five seconds. An impaulsing signal
      is recognizes by self-diagnosis when the reference mark signal and
      Hall sender signal do not correspond.

      * Hall Sender (G40) *

      The Hall sender is mounted in the ignition distributor. It is an
      electric control switch based on the Hall effect.

      The hall sender consists of a magnetic enclosure and integrated
      semiconductor circuit (the Hall IC). the IC is made of plastic to
      protect it from dampness, soiling and mechanical damage.

      A voltage signal is generated when the trigger wheel interrupts the
      magnetic field created by the Hall IC. The trigger wheel turns at
      camshaft speed. This means that the Hall sender generates one voltage
      signal for every two crankshaft revolutions.

      * Signal usage: *

      The Hall Sender (G40) signal and the Engine Speed/Reference Sensor
      (G28) signals are used to identify cylinder Number 1 for sequential
      fuel injection and knock regulation.

      * Substitute function: *

      There is no substitute function for the Hall Sender signal. The
      vehicle will start and run without this signal but the ignition
      timing will be retarded and there will be no sequential fuel injection.

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      The ECU will recognize a break in wiring or a continuously applied
      signal
      voltage (during start attempts as well).

      *** Knock Sensor I (G61) And Knock Sensor II (G66) ***

      Two knock sensors are used. A knock sensor works like a microphone to
      "listen" for spark knock or detonation.

      When knocking occurs, the ignition timing is retarded until the knocking
      is eliminated. Since the knock limit differs from cylinder to cylinder
      and changes within the operating range, knock regulation is done
      cylinder
      selectively.

      * Signal usage: *

      Knock regulation does not occur until the engine coolant temperature of
      40° C (104° F) is reached. Knock sensor I (G61) monitors cylinders 1,
      2,
      and 3. Knock sensor II (G66) monitors cylinder s 4, 5 and 6.

      With the aid of the Hall sender signal, the ECU can determine which
      cylinder is knocking. The ignition angle of the knocking cylinder is
      retarded in steps until the knocking stops up to a maximum of 12°.

      If spark knock is still detected, the ECU will retard the ignition
      timing 11° for all cylinders and record a fault.

      * Substitute function: *

      If a knock sensor fails, the ignition timing angle of its assigned
      cylinders is retarded.

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      The ECU recognized an open circuit if no signal from knock sensor I
      (G61)
      or knock sensor II (G66) is received by the ECU at an engine coolant
      temperature above 40° C (104° F).

      *** Oxygen Sensor (G39) ***

      The oxygen sensor (G39) is made of a ceramic material called zirconium
      dioxide. The inner and outer surfaces of the ceramic material are
      coated with platinum. The outer platinum surface is exposed to the
      exhaust gas, while the inner surface is exposed to the outside air.

      The difference in the amount of oxygen contacting the inner and outer
      surfaces of the oxygen sensor creates a pressure differential which
      results in a small voltage signal in the range of 100 to 1000 mV.
      The amount of voltage that is produced is determined by the fuel
      mixture.

      The oxygen sensor (G39) is heated electrically to keep it at constant
      operating temperature. The heater also ensures that the sensor comes
      to operating temperature quickly.

      The sensor has four wires. Two are for the heating element (ground and
      power). One wire is a signal wire for the sensor and one for the
      ground.

      * Signal usage: *

      The base injection time is corrected according to the voltage signal
      from the oxygen sensor to maintain a fuel/air ratio of approximately
      14.7:1.
      This allows the three-way catalytic converter to operate at its maximum
      efficiency.

      If the fuel mixture is lean (excess oxygen), the oxygen sensor will send
      a low voltage signal (about 100mV) to the ECU.

      If the fuel mixture is rich (lack of oxygen), the oxygen sensor will
      send
      a voltage signal (about 900 mV) to the ECU.

      * Substitute function: *

      There is no substitute function for oxygen sensor (G39). If signal
      fails,
      no oxygen sensor regulation takes place.

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      The ECU recognizes a fault if no reasonable signal voltage range is
      attained within five minutes after engine start with an engine coolant
      temperature over 40° C (104° F).

      The ECU also recognizes a open circuit in the wiring or a short circuit
      to ground andshort circuit to positive (sensor heating).

      *** Coolant Temperature Sensor (G62) ***

      Coolant Temperature Sensor (G62) is an NTC resistor. It's located in
      the
      thermostat housing. AS engine coolant temperature rises, the resistance
      of the sensor goes down.

      * Signal application: *

      Coolant temperature sensor signals are required as a correction factor
      for determination of ignition timing, injection timing and idle speed
      stabilization.

      In addition, these systems are activated depending on engine coolant
      temperature:

      .Knock control
      .Adaptation of idle speed volume control
      .Oxygen sensor operation
      .Fuel tank venting

      * Substitute function: *

      A fixed value of 80° C (176° F) is stored in the memory of the ECU and
      used in case of a faulty coolant temperature signal.

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      Self-diagnosis recognizes:

      Short circuits to positive
      Short circuits to ground

      *** Intake Air Temperature Sensor (G42) ***

      An intake air temperature sensor is located in the intake manifold on
      the
      left side.

      * Signal application: *

      The signal is used for idle stabilization and as a correction factor for
      ignition timing.

      * Substitute function: *

      If a failure of the Intake Air Temperature Sensor (G42) occurs, the
      Motronic Electronic Control Unit assumes a temperature of 20° C (68° F).
      If this happens, cold start problems could occur at temperatures under
      0° C (32° F).

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      The Motronic ECU recognizes open and short circuits to this component.

      *** EGR System ***

      All Corrados will come equipped with EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation).
      Passats sold in California will be equipped with EGR. The EGR system is
      used to reduce nitrous oxide emissions (Nox). The system recirculates a
      small portion of exhaust gas into the intake mixture.

      This exhaust gas is noncombustible and takes up a small space in the
      intake charge. The results is lower combustion temperatures and reduced
      Nox emissions.

      The EGR system does not operate at idle because Nox emissions are low
      during this time.

      * EGR Frequency Valve (N18) *

      The EGR Frequency Valve (N18) is mounted on the back of the intake
      manifold. A control pressure (vacuum) is formed in the frequency valve
      from the intake manifold pressure and atmospheric pressure (from the
      intake air elbow). This pressure is applied to the EGR valve via the
      EGR frequency valve (N18).

      The frequency valve controls the amount of vacuum supplied to the EGR
      valve by switching between the connection to the EGR valve and the
      intake air boot.

      Thus, the actual amount of recirculated exhaust gas can be determined
      by the ECU, depending on engine speed and load conditions. A membrane
      valve limits the vacuum supplied to the frequency valve at 200 mbar.

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      The ECU will recognize an open circuit or short circuit in the EGR
      frequency valve. If the EGR valve remains continuously open or closed
      because of mechanical failure, the EGR temperature sensor (G98) will
      signal this to the control unit.

      * Triggering: *

      The frequency valve (N18) ground circuit is controlled by the ECU
      depending on engine load and speed.

      * Substitute function: *

      There is no substitute function. If current to the frequency valve
      (N18) is interrupted, the EGR valve will remain closed.

      * EGR Temperature Sensor (G98) *

      The EGR temperature sensor (G98) is located in the EGR valve exhaust
      gas channel. It measures the temperature of the exhaust gas.

      The sensor is an NTC resistor. The electrical resistance of the
      sensor decreases as the temperature of the exhaust gas increases.

      * Signal usage: *

      The signal from the EGR temperature sensor (G98) is used only for
      the diagnosis of the EGR system and has no influence on the control.

      * Substitute function: *

      There is no substitute function.

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      The EGR system is switched on when the engine coolant temperature
      reaches 50° C (122° F).

      *** Crankcase Ventilation ***

      Crankcase vapors are vented from the cam cover to the intake air boot.

      A heating element is used to prevent icing during cold weather.

      PIN 1 = Positive (+)

      PIN 2 - To engine ground

      *** Idle Stabilizer Valve (N71) ***

      * Triggering: *

      The idle stabilizer valve (N71) is actuated on the ground side by the
      ECU.

      * Substitute function: *

      When a defect in the circuit is recognized, both output stages are shut
      off and the valve rotates to a fixed opening cross-section. This allows
      the engine to idle at a warm engine idle speed.

      * Self-diagnosis: *

      The ECU recognizes open and short circuits in the component.

      * Ignition System *

      Input Signals for Regulation of Ignition System

      .Engine speed
      .Engine load
      .Signal from knock sensors
      .Signal from throttle valve potentiometer
      .Coolant temperature
      .Signal from Hall sender

      Functions of Ignition System:

      .Ignition timing correction
      .Dwell angle regulation
      .Idling speed stabilization
      .Selective cylinder knock regulation

      The control unit uses the engine load and engine speed signals as well
      as
      the signal from the throttle valve potentiometer to calculate the
      ignition
      timing.

      If signals from the knock sensors indicate knocking combustion, the
      control
      unit retards the ignition timing of the knocking cylinder by 3° to max.
      12°
      until the knocking tendency of the concerned cylinder is reduced.

      When the knocking tendency no longer exists, the ignition timing is
      returned
      to the nominal value in steps of 0.5°.

      When knocking occurs, the ignition timing can be different for all
      cylinders
      because of the selective cylinder knock regulation.

      Fluctuations in the idling speed range are compensated by changing the
      ignition timing with the help of idling speed stabilization.

      The control unit receives the idling speed signal from the throttle
      valve
      potentiometer.

      Dwell angle regulation guarantees the necessary charging time of the
      ignition coil and, therefore, ignition voltage, regardless of speed and
      load conditions.

      Coolant temperature signals are required to correct the ignition timing
      of a cold engine and activate knock regulation.

      *** Power Supply Components ***

      Power for the Motronic Engine Management systems is supplied via Fuse
      (S18) and three relays:

      Fuel Pump Relay (J17)
      (Position 12)

      Power Supply Relay (J271)
      (Position 3)

      Oxygen Sensor Heater Power Supply Relay (J278)
      (above main Central Electric Panel)

      There is no internal power stage relay in the Motronic ECU.

      Wiring for the Motronic Engine Management system is routed to the engine
      via a single multi-pin connector. This makes engine removal quicker and
      provides a test point for trouble shooting procedures.

      A central ground station is located on the engine block below the intake
      manifold.

      It provides a ground point for:
      .ECUs
      .Sensors for the Motronic Engine Management system (and their shielding)
      .Output components (injectors, etc.)
      ----------


    18. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      2008 Passat 4Mo 3.6L Wagon, 98 VRt, 2010 Routan/Caravan :)
      08-14-2007 08:27 PM #193
      Quote, originally posted by John Galt »
      Everything you ever wanted to know about the VR6 engine, PART 1

      From: Annonymous
      To: gti-vr6@dev.tivoli.com
      Subject: Read this or ELSE!
      Date: Friday, April 11, 1997 12:46 PM

      Ladies and Gentelmen,
      Boys and Girls,
      Children of all ages,

      I present to you the Mother of all VR6 posts!

      This is the real thing!

      A one time post, if you missed this, tough ****!

      Don't chew on the barrel!, pull the trigger!

      Every last detail is covered for your vewing pleasure!
      The one, The only:

      ** Volkswagen VR-6 Engine w/ Motronic Engine Management System **
      ** Technical Manual **

      Service Training
      Self-Study Program 402

      Volkswagen of America, Inc.
      Sevice Training
      Printed in U.S.A.
      Printed 12/91
      Part # WSP 521-402-00

      All information contained
      in this manual is based on the latest product
      information available at the time of printing.
      The right is reserved to make changes at any
      time without notice.

      Always check Technical Bulletins and the mirofiche
      system for information that may supersede any
      information included in this manual.


      *** Introduction ***

      Volkswagen has developed a new six-cylinder engine called the VR-6.
      This 2.8-liter engine is unique in that the V-angle between cylinder
      banks is 15° rather than the 60° or 90° found in most conventional
      V-6 engine designs.

      The engine features a cast-iron crankcase, one light alloy crossflow
      cylinder head with two valves per cylinder operated by chain-driven
      overhead camshafts.

      All fuel and ignition requirements of the VR-6 engine are controlled
      by the Bosch Motronic M2.9 Engine Management System.

      This Engine Management System features an air mass sensor, dual knock
      sensors for cylinder-selective ignition knock regulation, and Lambda
      regulation.

      Exhaust gases are channeled through a 3-way catalytic converter.


      *** Engine Specifications ***

      Engine code: AAA
      Design: Four-stroke, internal combustion engine in "Vee"/in-line
      Displacement: 2.8 liter
      Bore diameter: 81.0 mm
      Stroke: 90.0 mm
      "Vee" angle: 15°
      Compression ratio: 10:1
      Fuel and ignition systems: Bosch Motronic M2.9
      Emission control: Lambda control with catalytic converter

      The name, VR-6 come from a combination of Vee and the German word
      Reihenmotor. The combination of the two can be roughly translated
      as "in-line Vee."

      Volkswagen has designed the 15° VR-6 to take advantage of
      conventional in-line six-cylinder engine features (single cylinder
      head, narrow width and excellent balancing) with the advantages
      of a V-6 engine design (short overall length and compactness).

      *** VR-6 ***

      The VR-6 was specifically designed for transverse installation
      in front-wheel-drive vehicles. By using the narrow 15° VR-6 engine,
      it was possible to install a six-cylinder engine in existing
      Volkswagen models.

      *** V-6 Conventional Design ***

      A wider V-6 engine of conventional design would have required
      lengthening existing vehicles to provide enough crumple zone
      between the front of the vehicle and the engine, and between
      the engine and the passenger cell.

      Using the narrow VR-6 engine will help Volkswagen meet current
      and future front-end crash standards.

      *** Overview ***

      The drop-forged steel, six-throw crankshaft runs in seven main
      bearings. The connecting rod journals are offset 22° to one
      another.

      Overhead camshafts (one for each bank of cylinders) operate the
      hydraulic valve lifters which, in turn, open and close the 39.0-mm
      intake valves and 34.3-mm exhaust valves.

      Because of the special VR-6 cylinder arrangement with two rows
      of combustion chambers in the same cylinder head, the intake
      runners between the two cylinder banks are of varying lengths.

      The difference in intake length is compensated in the overhead
      intake manifold. Each runner is 420 mm long.

      Exhaust gases are channeled from two 3-branch cat-iron exhaust
      manifolds into a sheathed Y-pipe. From there, they are channeled
      into a single flow before passing over the heated Oxygen Sensor
      and then to the catalytic converter.

      The oil pump driveshaft is driven by the intermediate shaft.

      Fuel injectors of the Bosch M2.9 Engine Management System are
      mounted behind the bend of the intake manifolds. Besides being
      the optimum location for fuel injection, this location also helps
      shield the injectors during a frontal impact.

      The water pump housing is cast integral with the engine crankcase.
      In addition to the belt-driven water pump, VR-6 engine will use
      an auxiliary electric pump to circulate water while the engine is
      running and during the cooling fan after-run cycle.

      In the interest of environmental friendliness, a replaceable oil
      filter cartridge is used on the VR-6 engine.

      The sump-mounted oil pump is driven via the intermediate shaft.
      An oil pressure control valve is integrated in the pump.

      *** Crankcase ***

      The crankcase is made from Perlitic gray cast iron with micro-alloy.
      Two banks of three cylinders are arranged at a 15° axial angle from
      the crankshaft.

      The cylinder bores are 81 mm in diameter with a spacing of 65 mm
      between cylinders. They are staggered along the length of the
      engine block to allow the engine to be shorter and more compact
      than conventional V-6 engines.

      The centerline of the cylinders are also offset from the centerline
      of the crankshaft by 12.5 mm.

      To accommodate the offset cylinder placement and narrow "Vee"
      design, the connecting rod journals are offset 22° to each other.
      This also allows the use of a 120° firing interval between cylinders.
      The firing order is: 1, 5, 3, 6, 2, 4

      *** Cylinder Head ***

      The aluminum crossflow cylinder head is manufactured in a permanent
      mold casting. The combustion-chamber side of the head is hardened
      through a separate chill casting

      Twenty stretch bolts are used to retain the cylinder head to the block.
      These bolts are accessible even with the camshafts installed.
      However, it is necessary to retorque the bolts after installation.
      Holes for bolts, numbers 12 and 20 are sleeved to make cylinder head
      installation easier.

      To help optimize flow through the cylinder head, the area above the
      valve seats has been machined. Valve shaft diameter has been reduced
      to 7.0 mm during development.

      Cylinders 1, 3, and 5 have short intake runners and long exhaust
      runners while cylinders 2, 4, and 6 have long intake runners and
      short exhaust runners.

      A crossflow cylinder head has allowed the use of a single cylinder
      exhaust manifold rather than a manifold for each bank.

      *** Combustion Chamber ***

      The surface of the combustion side of the cylinder head is flat.
      The combustion chamber is formed by the shape of the piston head.

      Ten different piston designs were tested during development of the
      VR-6 engine.

      The result of these tests was the selection of a slanted piston
      head within eccentric trough. The trough is offset from the center
      of the piston by 4.0 mm.

      Compression gap height (at TDC) is 1.5 mm. the compression ratio is
      10:1.

      *** Chain tensioners ***

      Operated by oil pressure and spring tension.

      The camshafts are driven by a two-stage chain-drive system located
      on the flywheel side of the engine.

      Chains were selected to drive the valve train in consideration of
      a Diesel version of the VR-6 engine.

      A single chain (lower) is driven by the crankshaft which, in turn,
      drives an intermediate sprocket and shaft at a ratio of 3:4.

      The intermediate shaft sprocket drives the camshafts via a double
      roller chain (upper) at a ratio of 2:3. A double roller chain is
      used to drive the camshaft sprockets because it must transfer more
      torque than the lower chain.

      The specific gear ratio selection was chosen in order to keep the
      camshaft sprocket size small. This helps keep the overall engine
      height to a minimum.

      Chain tension is maintained by two chain tensioners. The upper
      chain tensioner is hydraulically operated by engine oil pressure
      and spring tension.

      The lower chain tensioner (with mechanical lock) is operated by
      spring tension and lubricated with engine oil.

      Chain flutter is prevented by guide rails on the slack side of
      both chains.

      *** Engine Cooling System ***

      The VR-6 Engine uses an impeller-type water pump driven by the
      poly-ribbed belt.

      The pump housing itself is cast into the engine block adjacent
      to cylinder number 2.

      In addition, an Auxiliary Electric Coolant Pump also circulates
      engine coolant anytime the ignition is switched on.

      The Auxiliary Electric Coolant Pump also runs when the engine
      is switched off and the coolant temperature goes over 107° C (220° F).
      It runs in conjunction with the Radiator Cooling After-run System.

      Circulating the coolant during this time helps cool the engine
      block and prevent the possibility of air pockets forming in the
      cylinder head.

      The thermostat housing of the cooling system also houses the
      temperature senders G2, and F87 for the Radiator Cooling After-run
      System, and temperature sender G62 for the Motronic Engine Management
      System.

      *** Intake Manifold ***

      Volumetric efficiency must be uniform to attain smooth engine
      running and optimal power output under all operating conditions.
      This, in turn, requires identical flow conditions in the intake
      ports of all cylinders.

      Since the lengths of the intake runners in the VR-6 cylinder head
      are not equal, it was necessary to compensate with the internal
      design of the intake manifold.

      All air intake passages are 420 mm long.

      *** Auxiliary Drives ***

      A double-sided poly-ribbed belt drives all the auxiliary components
      of the VR-6 engine.

      A spring-operated tensioning roller keeps the poly-ribbed belt at
      the proper tension. The belt tension is released by threading a
      long 8 mm bolt into a threaded hole on the tensioner.

      *** System Overview ***

      The VR-6 engine will use the Motronic Engine Management System
      version M2.9.

      All Corrados will have EGR while only California-version Passats
      will have EGR.

      *** Fuel Delivery System ***

      A two stage fuel pump supplies fuel through the filter to the fuel
      manifold and the four hole injectors. The pump is located in the
      fuel tank.

      The fuel manifold is located on the intake manifold. A fuel pressure
      regulator is attached to the fuel manifold on the fuel return side.

      The fuel pressure regulator is a diaphragm-type regulator. Fuel
      pressure is regulated depending on intake manifold pressure.

      As intake manifold pressure changes, the pressure regulator will
      increase or decrease the system fuel pressure. This maintains
      constant pressure differences between the intake manifold pressure
      and fuel pressure.

      And Part 2 guys.
      Everything you Ever Wanted to Know about the VR6 Engine (Part 2)


      Modified by nater at 7:30 PM 8-14-2007


    19. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 08:34 PM #194
      Quote, originally posted by DHill »
      Just 'cause it gets asked so much....

      2.54 cm = 1 inch and of course, there are 10 mm to a centimeter. So 25 mm spacers are about an inch wide... and you can do the math for the rest.


    20. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      2008 Passat 4Mo 3.6L Wagon, 98 VRt, 2010 Routan/Caravan :)
      08-14-2007 08:38 PM #195
      Quote, originally posted by VinceQc »
      This DIY is about making your fogs as DRL. It is really simple, takes about 5 minutes.

      What you need:
      -Flat screw driver
      -Electrical tape
      -Sharp knife

      First, remove your headlight switch.
      Next, cut the yellow wire on slot 15 about 2 inches long from the switch.
      http://1.8t.org/~vince/misc/DIYvwvortex/drl1.jpg

      Strip the wire on slot 13 for about ¼ inch long and connect the yellow wire to the #13 wire.
      http://1.8t.org/~vince/misc/DIYvwvortex/drl2.jpg

      Secure all this with electrical tape
      http://1.8t.org/~vince/misc/DIYvwvortex/drl3.jpg

      You are now done, reinstall everything. When you turn ignition on, automatically, the fogs will turns on.
      http://1.8t.org/~vince/misc/DIYvwvortex/drl4.jpg
      http://1.8t.org/~vince/misc/DIYvwvortex/drl5.jpg


      I take no responsibility for any damage this modification to your electrical system may cause.




      Modified by nater at 12:15 PM 3-2-2008

    21. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 08:42 PM #196
      Quote, originally posted by DHill »
      Edit: page relocation will end up somewhere around here
      http://www.zpipedragon.com/Hom...s.htm

      I swear this is the last DIY I will do for awhile.

      Removing seat upholstery

      Full DIY is hosted here

      Seats come out easy. There are plastic trim pieces along the driver's and passenger's seat runners. Remove them. Then undo the bolt at the front and bottom of each seat and slide out. Done.

      Rear seats are removed just as easily. Unscrew the screws at the front.

      http://zpipedragon.com/images/Seats/Seats_rear.jpg

      Pull out cushions. Backrests are removed by taking out the retaining clips at the split,pushing back the spring-loaded locking mechanism on either side, and removing.

      Pushing the locking mechanism out of the way:
      http://zpipedragon.com/images/...l.jpg

      Retaining clip removal:
      http://zpipedragon.com/images/...s.jpg

      Removing the upholstery is a pain the in A$$. The construction of your seats is simple. There is a wire frame. This was placed into a mold, and the foam for your seats was molded around this wire frame. The frame gives the foam some rigidity, and it also serves as mounting points for the upholstery. It is all HOOKS AND HOG RINGS.

      http://zpipedragon.com/images/...2.jpg

      On the inside of the upholstery, there are panels sewn in that are supported by metal rods. These rods hook to the wire frame in the seat foam, and to the wire frame inside the seat.

      http://zpipedragon.com/images/...t.jpg

      The rear seats come off easy, once you figure out how to handle the hooks and hog rings (I suggest a good selection of pliers). The front backrest comes undone with a plastic trim piece along the bottom. Unclip that and disconnect the wire hooks on the rear of the seat.

      http://zpipedragon.com/images/...s.jpg
      http://zpipedragon.com/images/...3.jpg

      Then you can fold the upholstery up and disconnect the main support wire at the top.
      http://zpipedragon.com/images/...d.jpg

      If you have seat heaters, they are secured with merely adhesive. You can peel them off and reapply them later with headliner spray on quick-tack adhesive. The leather will pop off the head rest posts easily.

      The bottom cushions come off easily once the plastic trim pieces have been removed. There are sharp hooks that keep the leather in line. Don't cut yourself.

      If you are doing work with the seats, like reupholstering them, you might want to cut the seat heater wires. The bottom and top seat heaters are connected and it is a hassle juggling the pieces of the seat around while you work. I cut mine and soldered it later.

      More detailed tips are in the link above. IM if you have questions, and hopefully I can help.




      Modified by nater at 12:28 PM 3-2-2008

    22. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 08:51 PM #197
      Quote, originally posted by DHill »
      Hey look I'm going to post another DIY!!

      Edit: Page relocation will put it somewhere around here
      http://www.zpipedragon.com/Hom...s.htm

      Someone asked about the grit sizes for sandpaper. - 80 grit will be really rough, unless you have some nasty scratches. If you start with 120 or 220 on an already smooth surface, it should be alright. Go up to about 400 or so, 'cause that's what the autobody guys do. Primer helps too, which I didn't use because I'm a knob. No, you're a knob. No, I'm a knob.

      Whatever. I've also learned that painting wheels like this won't last long. They are likely to chip, unless you only drive your car 1500 miles/year. Powdercoating is the better way to go. They spray 'em, then wire them up, and cook 'em at 180 degrees C for about an hour. That's what they do for axle pieces and bike frames, and it's much more durable and much better.

      I just had an idea - someone should look into anodizing aluminum wheels. Oh, nevermind.


      The topic of wheel painting came up... here is what I learned from an experiment.

      Sand thoroughly. If there are any smooth surfaces the paint won't stick. Really give it a few days to cure... my experiment was still sticky after 2 days. I'd give it 3-4 days in order to save yourself some time and work. A shot of engine clearcoat afterwords will do wonders.

      Edit: Can you see why this wheel was the lab rat? 2 points for the winner.

      1) Sand wheel and tape off areas you don't want painted.

      2) Taping...

      3) Look how crappy my digital camera is!!

      4)

      Other info:

      sickvento says:


      Props to Rays_Golf_III for posting a more thorough DIY:
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1991735


    23. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 09:14 PM #198
      Quote, originally posted by Teets »
      MOUNTING YOUR GLX SPOILER:

      didn't think to say something until i saw the DIY spoiler mod in here...

      all you should do is line up the spoiler, and drill holes... but do it in little steps...

      line up the spoiler and make a marker spot on trunk lid
      drill holes with small bit
      then line up spoiler
      drill hole a little larger
      and repeat til fits...
      this way, you can be guaranteed for the spoiler to line up straight... by gradually increasing hole size, you can still adjust where the bigger hole will be

      and DON'T USE the spoiler brackets... i was told that they pull up through the trunk lid and leave indents after time... it holds perfectly well without them, and the guy who put mine on is very wise when it comes to this stuff... just use a bigger washer if you want, but don't really need to...


    24. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      08-14-2007 09:20 PM #199
      Quote, originally posted by DHill »
      TT Brake FAQ

      Q: What does the TT kit change?

      A: It gives you bigger rotors (11" --> 12.3"). It also gives you carrier adapter brackets to fit your stock caliper over the new, bigger rotor. You will also get pads.

      Q: Where do I get the TT kit?

      A: Check out Potterman's. They offer the kit with various rotor brands, as well as pad brands. In my experience, their price is the best.

      Q: If I get the TT kit, can I put my front rotors on the back?

      A: No. Your rear rotors also serve as hubs. The bearings for the rear wheel are in there and the rear and front rotors are therefore very different (see pic below of rear rotors). If you want bigger rear brakes, check out Bahn Brenner

      Q: Is the TT kit better than Wilwood?

      A: There is hardly any way to categorize this. The TT kit increases swept area which will increase stopping power, whereas the Wilwood kit increases the stopping force (applied by the upgraded 4-piston calipers), which also increases stopping power. The only way to know is to compare the force applied by the stock caliper and the Wilwood caliper and compare the two. Here's why:

      The factors that stop your car are outlined as such (if you can't mulitply, please skip):

      Work Done by brakes per "a" degrees of swept area -->

      W = f*d = f*r*a = m*P*A*r*a

      Where, W = work, m = coefficient of friction, P = pressure applied, A = area under brake pad, r = radius of rotor, a= angle swept

      Stopping power = work/time. So see how long it takes to stop your car from some pre-set speed and you can calculate the "stopping power", assuming you know some of the variables above.

      I posted this once before and some pencilneck got mad because I used pressure instead of force. Well, you won't measure the force directly, you would have to measure pressure. Notice, however, that pressure is P=F/A (force divided by area). P is multiplied by A, so in the end the quantity P*A =F. By measuring pressure, you get the force. Nobody is going to conduct this experiment anyway, but if you did, you'd calculate pressures (or "stress" as the MSE and ME guys call it).

      Pros for TT kit

      1. OEM parts = easy to find/replace.
      2. Affordability (about $485)
      3. Uses stock calipers, so you don't have to bleed your brakes

      Cons for TT Kit

      1. uses OEM parts!
      2. if you have older calipers, you might need to replace them, and then you are getting into the price range of a total brake rebuild

      Pros for Wilwood

      1. 4 piston calipers are neat
      2. This is affordable for a total brake re-do
      3. the aluminum Wilwood calipers are feather light
      4. Changing pads is a snap (literally) with the nifty Wilwood design. They come right out of the top (see pic below)

      Cons for Wilwood

      1. Technically, these brakes are for race applications only.
      2. Since the parts are not OEM, if something needs replaced it is more expensive

      Q: Why do I have to worry about stopping power?

      A:
      Almost all of the work done by your brakes is devoted to sucking kinetic energy from your moving car and converting it to dissipated heat (which is why slotted rotors is such a good idea). What this tells you is the following. If you want to increase the stopping power of your car (the work done per unit time) you:

      1) Increase the coefficient of friciton between rotor and pad (the factor "m" from above), i.e., try different materials (both kits do this)

      2) Increase the pressure (P) between rotor and pad, i.e., get yourself some beefy calipers (i.e. Wilwood Kit)

      3) Increase the area of your pads (A).

      4) Increase the radius (r), and therefore the diameter, of your rotors (i.e., TT Kit)

      In this case, using the TT kit, we go from a 280mm disc to a 312 mm disc, increasing our radius by a factor of 1.114. So we increase the work by a factor of 1.114. (Since you use the stock caliper, pressure remains the same).

      This equates to an ~11% increase in stopping power, given a fixed amount of time for stopping measurement, the same pressure P exerted by the piston, the same area A of the pad, the same coefficient of friction m, and a fixed rotation of the rotor angle a. This is all theoretical, of course.

      In realistic situations, I would guess that the net increase in stopping power would be on the order of ~5% (I don't care if you think I'm being subjective. This is an internet forum ). This is far less than what you would gain with a brand new 1900$ Brembo kit, but it's a nice alternative.

      Now it all comes down to price. MMP sells the Wilwood kit for about $650, which isn't much more than the TT kit. You basically get a nice brake rebuild without using any stock parts. After debating over this for months, I chose the Wilwood kit. The Wilwood kit will give you kick ass braking, and it will fit in 15" wheels or larger. That's what I eventually went with:


    25. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
      Join Date
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      2008 Passat 4Mo 3.6L Wagon, 98 VRt, 2010 Routan/Caravan :)
      08-14-2007 09:24 PM #200
      Quote, originally posted by punkassjim »
      This worked on the seats I got, which were '94 heated sport cloth from a Jetta GLX. No guarantees that this works on all seats, but I'm guessing it will.

      1. Take seat out of car or slide it all the way forward
      2. remove lower plastic cover from height-adjustment side of seat
      3. there's a brace that secures the seatback to the seatbottom
      4. unscrew the screw that holds that brace to the seatbottom
      5. move the brace outta the way
      6. put the screw back in, so you don't lose it.
      7. put the plastic cover back on.

      Now you can tilt the seat forward with the little flip-lever that holds the OTHER side of the seatback onto the seatbottom. That one's spring-loaded, just like the GTI seat, but there is no cable or lever installed to actuate it. You can make your own, but I opted to leave it that way.


    26. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
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      2008 Passat 4Mo 3.6L Wagon, 98 VRt, 2010 Routan/Caravan :)
      10-08-2007 09:17 AM #201
      back in business.

    27. Global CSI Moderator nater's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 10th, 2000
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      2008 Passat 4Mo 3.6L Wagon, 98 VRt, 2010 Routan/Caravan :)
      01-18-2008 08:50 PM #202
      Key Blank Codes for Votex Roof Rack Keys:

      Ilco L6S
      Orion LAS1

      From: Gibson5469


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