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    Thread: Rear Brake Pads Change DIY

    1. Member
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      07-25-2008 02:55 PM #1
      Following up on my Front Pad Change posted last week...

      1) The rear brakes on the R32 (like many other VWs today) have the emergency handbrake integrated into the brake caliper, and there is a need for the special tool to retract the rear piston without damage.

      Here are pictures of the rear brake on the R32

      2) You will need a 15mm slim fit open end combination wrench to loosen the caliper guide bolts. You can typically find these at a bicycle shop...or try one of your local hardware stores.
      The slim fit wrench is the one that goes inbetween the caliper and the caliper bracket (next to the dust boot)...see pictures

      3) Slide caliper off brake disc and pads after you have removed both upper and lower guide bolts.

      4) This is the special tool you will need to retract the rear piston. You can buy it online from a variety of retailers or you can rent it from Autozone which I did...The correct size attachment plate is the one on the top, 1st right plate from the middle (H014).

      5) Your favorite rear brake pads should be the 1108 shape/pattern. There are no sensors on the rear and this pad shape/pattern is available in a variety of compounds from a few aftermarket manufacturers.

      6) Here is what the stock pads look next to the ones I bought.

      7) Apply a layer of grease (high temp, brake caliper suitable grease only) to the back of the pad where it would contact the piston and on the pad edges where it would contact the caliper bracket.

      8) Using the specical tool, slowly retract the piston back into the caliper.

      9) Place the new pads on the caliper bracket before you slide the caliper back over and onto the brake disc and caliper bracket.

      10) Re-assembly of caliper with new pads onto the caliper bracket is simply the reverse of when you took it off.

      11) A thin coating of anti-seize compound on the hub is a good idea so that you won't have the wheel 'fusing' to the hub after some time.

      12) This would not be a bad time to clean up the wheel (inside and outside).

      13) Finally, torque lug bolts to the required setting (I use 80 ft lbs since I did not know what the factory spec is...I have since been told that the facotry spec is 88 ft lbs).

      Note: Usual disclaimers applies to this DIY, I have attempted to be as detailed as I can, but if you have specific questions, I will be glad to answer based on my experience. Make sure your car is properly supported and secured before you work on it.

      Modified by AsianDude at 1:57 PM 7-25-2008


      Modified by AsianDude at 1:58 PM 7-25-2008


      Modified by AsianDude at 1:58 PM 7-25-2008


      Modified by AsianDude at 7:16 AM 7-26-2008


    2. Member ZPrime's Avatar
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      07-25-2008 03:28 PM #2
      Rather than "thinly spreading" the anti-seize on the hub, it's a lot easier to use the kind that is a pot with a brush... and just do two or three little blobs between the bolt holes on the hub. The wheel will squish it out and cover where you need. A little bit of rust isn't going to hold it on there anyway, it's only when the whole face is rusted over that they will stick...

      Also, make sure the grease you are using on the pad backs and contact points is HIGH TEMP / brake grease and not just standard anti-seize. You don't want to burn up your grease on a track day.

      Oh, and why use the special caliper tool? Every time I've had to retract a caliper, we just use the old pad pressed up against the face of the caliper, and then a C-clamp around the back. Tighten C-clamp and the caliper retracts. Is this one special somehow, does it twist on the way in or something weird?

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    3. Member jaydub's Avatar
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      07-25-2008 04:22 PM #3
      I have the same tool, and it does twist as it as it compresses the piston. I know in my Mk4 Jetta, it was required to turn the piston otherwise you could seize it.

      I don't know if it's necessary on the Mk5, I don't even own one.


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      07-26-2008 08:17 AM #4
      Quote, originally posted by ZPrime »

      Oh, and why use the special caliper tool? Every time I've had to retract a caliper, we just use the old pad pressed up against the face of the caliper, and then a C-clamp around the back. Tighten C-clamp and the caliper retracts. Is this one special somehow, does it twist on the way in or something weird?

      It does have to turn to retract...the old push method won't work for the rear...the fronts are ok.


    5. Member Clegg's Avatar
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      07-27-2008 11:06 AM #5
      Running Semi-Metalic pads?

      arent you worried about screwing up the finish on your wheels? The dust that comes off Semi-Metalic pads is at like a million f'n degress and when it lands on the wheel it melts into the wheel's paint clear coat.

      I had this happen on another car back in the day... I tried to clean the rim but it never got clean or not as clean as it should.


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      08-13-2008 07:13 PM #6
      Could not find Ceramic pads for this car...otherwise I would run those
      If you clean your wheels frequently enough...Semi Metallic is ok imo

    7. 08-13-2008 07:17 PM #7
      what comes on the car ceramic or semi metallic?
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    8. Member BMP 132's Avatar
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      08-13-2008 11:42 PM #8
      Quote, originally posted by AsianDude »
      Could not find Ceramic pads for this car...otherwise I would run those
      If you clean your wheels frequently enough...Semi Metallic is ok imo

      I'm running Hawk ceramics front and rear on my car. Pads are awesome. No dust and excellent bite.


    9. 08-13-2008 11:49 PM #9
      Awesome writeup

      Did you have to open the cap to the brake fluid reservoir before you pushed the caliper in?

      Quote, originally posted by Clegg »
      I had this happen on another car back in the day... I tried to clean the rim but it never got clean or not as clean as it should.

      I think a claybar+light polishing can take care of that no problem.


    10. Member BMP 132's Avatar
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      08-14-2008 10:23 AM #10

      I can't speak for AD, but when I did my pads I didn't remove the cap. It would probably make it easier though as it was kind of a PITA to retract the pistons. Even with the proper tool. FYI, if you plan on renting the tool from say, Autozone, the price is $35 but you can buy a new one from them for the same amount.


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      08-14-2008 01:41 PM #11
      Quote, originally posted by justinperkins »

      Did you have to open the cap to the brake fluid reservoir before you pushed the caliper in?

      Yes I did loosen/remove the brake fluid resevoir cap to release pressure (if any) but more importantly so to make sure that the fluid would not overflow when the pistons were retracted from each caliper.


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      08-14-2008 01:43 PM #12
      Quote, originally posted by BMP 132 »

      FYI, if you plan on renting the tool from say, Autozone, the price is $35 but you can buy a new one from them for the same amount.

      Renting the tool from Autozone is free. The $35 plus tax is credited back to your credit card when you return the tool. (at least that is how it worked at the local Autozone for me).


    13. Member BMP 132's Avatar
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      08-14-2008 01:48 PM #13
      Yeah its probably the same at my local autozone too but they didn't tell me that. I'm glad I did buy it though since I got the wrong rear pads at first. One less trip I had to make.

    14. Member aeproberts21's Avatar
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      08-19-2008 09:46 AM #14
      Does the tool work for other cars as well? Just curious if I could re-use it on my wifes honda?
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    15. Member boki-san's Avatar
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      08-19-2008 12:33 PM #15
      Quote, originally posted by aeproberts21 »
      Does the tool work for other cars as well? Just curious if I could re-use it on my wifes honda?

      yes.

      90% of that kit is for other cars

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    16. Member vr6fanatic's Avatar
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      08-19-2008 12:56 PM #16
      I have the same brake tool kit, and I have used it on my R and my brother's 91 Toyota Supra and my other brother's 94 Toyota Celica.
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      08-25-2008 09:53 AM #17
      I am doing this install this week. I noticed that there are no torque specs on the instructions.

      Anyone know how tight I need to make the guide bolts?

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    18. Member aeproberts21's Avatar
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      08-28-2008 12:26 PM #18
      So I just got back from Advanced Auto Parts. They didn't have the specialty tool that was mentioned in the DIY. They instead told me this part would work with a normal 3/8 ratchet. The package says it works with most european cars. Will it actually work for the rear brakes?

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      08-28-2008 02:33 PM #19
      Quote, originally posted by aeproberts21 »
      So I just got back from Advanced Auto Parts. They didn't have the specialty tool that was mentioned in the DIY. They instead told me this part would work with a normal 3/8 ratchet. The package says it works with most european cars. Will it actually work for the rear brakes?

      This tool does not work (I've got one sitting in my toolbox)
      You need the set (or similar) shown above in my pics


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      08-28-2008 02:34 PM #20
      Quote, originally posted by aeproberts21 »
      I am doing this install this week. I noticed that there are no torque specs on the instructions.

      Anyone know how tight I need to make the guide bolts?

      I never found out what the torque specs are for any of the bolts.
      But I would venture to say that the caliper guide bolts are no more than 10-12ft lbs


    21. Junior Member
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      12-13-2008 10:25 PM #21
      I have found a rear brake caliper kit that looks just like the one in the picture at harbor freight.......I paid around $20 for it.....

    22. 02-07-2009 12:18 PM #22
      You MUST replace the caliper bolts. They are TTY bolts & the torque spec is 35 Nm (26 ft-lb). USE A TORQUE WRENCH.
      The factory wheel torque is 120 Nm (90 ft-lb).

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      05-02-2009 08:39 AM #23
      Or would all 15mm box wrenches be considered slim ?
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    25. Member f.rizzo's Avatar
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      05-07-2009 12:57 AM #25
      Another option for the brake reset tool:

      http://www.metalnerd.com/cat08.htm


      Works on the front and the rear and comes with the thin 15mm wrench.

      FYI...


      Modified by f.rizzo at 10:01 PM 5-6-2009

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    26. 08-07-2009 03:21 PM #26
      Quote, originally posted by AsianDude »

      Yes I did loosen/remove the brake fluid resevoir cap to release pressure (if any) but more importantly so to make sure that the fluid would not overflow when the pistons were retracted from each caliper.

      Thanks for an awesome DIY. Do you have to bleed the brake lines after doing the installation? Also, is there a risk of overflow even if the reservoir is open?


      Modified by deepclue at 12:41 PM 8-8-2009


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      08-08-2009 11:04 AM #27
      You should always bleed out some fluid after the install just to make sure that no air got trapped towards the end of the brake line when you retracted the pistons.
      If no fluid was topped up during the life of the car, then you should not have an overflow situation when the caliper pistons are retracted.
      Good Luck!!!



      Modified by AsianDude at 10:05 AM 8-8-2009

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      05-03-2011 02:47 PM #28
      what direction do you need to spin the rear piston to retract it?

    29. Member Ikey3125's Avatar
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      05-03-2011 03:21 PM #29
      Quote Originally Posted by bulldawg79 View Post
      what direction do you need to spin the rear piston to retract it?
      Clockwise

    30. Member urshur's Avatar
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      05-04-2011 06:39 PM #30
      i literally JUST did this at my friends house, rented the kit from Autozone for $60 and returned it and got my money back.
      BTW......DAMN your brakes are CLEAN lol i cleaned mine a little since it was the perfect oppurtunity
      but nowhere near that clean

    31. Member Voyles's Avatar
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      05-04-2011 08:06 PM #31
      Don't have to have a slim 15mm wrench. I used a set of needle nose pliers to hold the nut until i could get a regular 15mm wrench in there.

      BTW ... super clean rotors man.

    32. 05-04-2011 08:36 PM #32
      This is good stuff Mod please sticky it.

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      05-07-2011 05:01 PM #33
      this was super easy to do. i was able to make due using the front brake tool and a pair of channel pliers so i didnt have to rent the brake kit from a local auto store.


      http://www.ecstuning.com/Search/Brake_Tool/ES8211/

    34. 05-08-2011 10:34 AM #34
      WOuld you happen to know the size of the tool, H014?

    35. Banned BetaOp9's Avatar
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      05-08-2011 12:42 PM #35
      Quote Originally Posted by bulldawg79 View Post
      this was super easy to do. i was able to make due using the front brake tool and a pair of channel pliers so i didnt have to rent the brake kit from a local auto store.


      http://www.ecstuning.com/Search/Brake_Tool/ES8211/
      I don't see why not to rent it, it's free.

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