Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    VWVortex


    Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
    Results 1 to 35 of 71

    Thread: DIY - MKIV VR6 Headgasket Replacement / Reinstallation

    1. Member
      Join Date
      Nov 27th, 2004
      Location
      Charlotte, NC
      Posts
      7,126
      Vehicles
      2000 VW Jetta VRT, 2000 Audi TT Quattro
      10-01-2008 07:32 PM #1
      DIY - MKIV Headgasket replacement

      This is one of those infrequently performed, but difficult to do procedures. Usually, a headgasket will be replaced in order to lower compression for FI applications, or due to a headgasket leak. Signs of a leaky headgasket could be found by oil in the coolant, coolant in the oil, visible steam/oil leaks at the engine block interface, or results of a poor compression test. If you suspect a leaking headgasket, I *highly* recommend you perform a compression test on your vehicle (see http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1510186 for information).

      First, some light reading. Here are a list of threads to peruse prior to performance of this DIY:
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3818300
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3517295
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1581500
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1957419
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1530901

      This procedure is NOT for the mechanically inept, nor for the faint of heart. You will be removing VITAL engine components. I cannot be held responsible if this DIY causes engine damage or injury!

      Needed Parts
      - New headgasket (approx $45)
      - New OEM head bolts (approx $50)
      - New OEM gasket for the Waterpump (approx $10)
      - Optional: ARP headstuds instead of OEM head bolts (approx $180)
      - Optional: New valve cover gasket (approx $20)
      - Optional: Permatex Copper gasket spray

      Needed Tools
      - 10mm socket
      - ratchet
      - drip pan
      - small blade screwdriver
      - vice-grips
      - 12mm triple-square bit

      Note: This procedure ran me about a full day. Make sure you set aside the appropriate amount of time based on your skill / knowledge. I HIGHLY recommend you label ALL your parts, connectors, hoses, and use lots of plastic bags for bolts and smaller parts.

      i. Initial conditions
      - the coolant is drained from the engine from both the block and the radiator.
      - the battery is disconnected and removed per steps 1.a through 1.f of the Starter Motor Replacement DIY - http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2269482
      - various intake pieces are removed per steps 2.a through 9 of the Transmission Removal / Replacement DIY - http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2703042
      - the spark plug wires and engine covers are removed per steps 2 through 15 of the Spark Plug Replacement DIY - http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1792683
      - the intake manifold and coilpack are removed per steps 1 through 16 of the Intake and Coilpack Removal DIY - http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2916098
      - the lock carrier is moved forward per the Lock Carrier Movement DIY - http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2368291
      - the serpentine belt and tensioner are removed per steps 4 and 5 of the Tensioner Removal DIY - http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1138497

      If you've read this far, and you still want to move on, then great! Let's get started.

      1. Start by removing the vacuum line from the Fuel Pressure regulator. Pull the rubber "T" junction away from the FPR.

      2. Slide the rear knock sensor out of its bracket, and disconnect it from the connector. It is located on the passenger's side, at the rear of the engine.

      3. Remove the rear knock sensor bracket by unscrewing the 10mm bolt holding the bracket to the block.

      4. Depressurize the fuel lines by performing steps 3 and 4 of the Fuel Filter removal DIY - http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1276409. You only need to disconnect the connector towards the front of the filter. Be sure to have a drip pan below the filter to catch the gasoline that spills out.

      5. Place some paper towels near the fuel feed line. Then press the small tab on the feed line, and pull up on the line. It should come apart, and spill some gasoline on your paper towels.

      6. Repeat step 5 for the fuel return line.

      7. When both lines are removed, cover them with tape to prevent foreign material entry.

      8. Using the Fuel Line / Injector removal DIY as a guide ( http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2975414 ) remove the fuel rail from the cylinder head.

      Removing components from the cylinder head
      9. Remove the line connecting the intake to the lower manifold. This should come right out by pulling hard.

      10. Locate the solenoid valve near the SAI pump. There are actually two solenoid valves down by the SAI pump; one is for the intake shifter rod changeover, and the other one goes to the Kombi valve. You want the solenoid with the lines that go to the Kombi valve. Remove the solenoid from its carrier.

      11. Next, you want to disconnect the vacuum line that goes from the solenoid to the Kombi valve. This is really difficult to do, so I just cut the line and put a small coupler between the two ends. Here is a picture of the line with the head in the air.

      12. Now you want to remove the corrugated plastic line that connects the air filter housing to the SAI pump. I don't have any good pictures of this, but the hose you want to remove is the one above the coilpack in this picture here:

      13. Remove power from the SAI pump by disconnecting the power connector.

      14. Now remove the valve cover and set the engine to TDC by performing steps 1-9 of the Timing Chain DIY - http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1264409.

      15. Remove the coolant hose that connects the engine block to the heater core using vise-grips or pliers.

      16. Remove the tensioner and the upper timing chain cover by performing steps 10-13 of the timing Chain DIY - http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1264409

      17. Clean the oil off of the chains and the cam gears, and mark the same location on the chains and cam gears using nail polish or white-out. This guarantees that the timing will remain the same. All the slack in the chain should be on the RIGHT side, closer to the firewall.

      Note: In the following step, remove the cam timing plates. If the cams move, they could be damaged.
      18. Now you want to remove ONE of the cam gears. The easiest one to remove is the one on the short cam. With a 24mm wrench (or open-end wrench) hold the flat spots in the cam and impact the cam gear bolt off. I suppose you could use a long breaker bar, but there is a much greater likelihood that the engine will move off TDC.

      19. With the bolt removed, remove the cam gear by wiggling it back and forth on the sides. Leave the chain on the cam for now. When the cam is fully removed, tie up the chain so it does not fall into the engine. This would suck.

      20. Remove the upper tensioner guide rail by removing the two bolts holding the rail in. Then pull the rail up and out towards the front of the car.

      21. Using the Thermostat Removal DIY as a guide ( http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2385488 ), disconnect the temperature sensor and the various hoses connecting to the thermostat housing. Then, remove the thermostat housing.

      22. With the thermostat housing removed, the side of the engine should look something like this:

      23. Remove the oil dipstick by pulling straight up on the shaft. It should come out easily.

      24. Remove the exhaust nuts that connect the exhaust manifold to the downpipe using step 7 of the 12V Downpipe removal DIY - http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2798484.

      Removing the head

      Note:You are now at the point where you are ready to remove the head. Make SURE that everything is disconnected from the head, because if you lift the head with something still connected, you may break something or drop the head.

      25. Using the loosening order shown below, loosen the 20 head bolts that hold the cylinder head to the engine block. An impact wrench is *amazingly* useful here. The correct size is a 12mm triple-square bit. I used 3 passes to remove the bolts:
      1) The first pass is to just break the bolts free.
      2) The second pass is to unscrew the bolts until slightly loose.
      3) The last pass is to fully remove the bolts.
      Make SURE you bag and label EVERY bolt. There are three different sizes, and you need to put the right bolt into the right hole.

      26. Now that the bolts are removed, lift the head off the block. Yeah, right. The head probably weighs around 50-60 pounds. Since I do all my work by myself, I used a series of wood blocks as wedges (like the ancient egyptians!!) to lift the head up into the air. When it cleared the front carrier, I lifted it up fully and set it on its side.

      27. With the head removed, inspect the cylinders and walls. I was amazed how little carbon buildup there was, even after 180k miles!! You can even see the cross-hatch on the cylinder walls!

      28. Locate the two alignment dowels for the cylinder head. They may be in the block or the head, but remove them. You will re-install them later.

      29. With the dowels removed, lift straight up on the headgasket. It should come right out.

      Cleaning mating surfaces
      30. With the head removed, thorougly clean all mating surfaces. I used a scrub pad and some 600 grit sandpaper. Occasionally, I would vacuum out the debris. Here is the result of cleaning the surface.

      31. Next, cover up all the oil passages with some kind of tape. This is to prevent entry of any foreign material.

      32. Pour some kind of solvent into the top of the pistons that are the highest up. I used seafoam, and let it soak for 10-15 minutes.

      33. Next, I used a dremel with a wire brush on the end on low speed to clean off all the carbon. With the seafoam sitting in the chamber, it came right off.

      34. In order to get the other cylinders, you will have to rotate the engine off TDC. After vacuuming out EVERY cylinder, coat each cylinder wall lightly with new oil. Then crank the engine clockwise to bring a new set of cylinders to the top. Make SURE you return the engine to TDC with the #1 cylinder fully up when you are done!!!!!

      35. This step is not required unless you are installing a headgasket spacer to lower compression. Spray both sides of the headgasket with permatex copper spray. This will ensure a good seal between the spacer and the head / block.

      36. Reinstall the dowels you removed on step 28.

      37. Now, reinstall the new headgasket. If you can read the lettering in the upper right hand corner of the headgasket, you have it installed the correct way.

      38. Using one of the old, long bolts, screw the bolt fully into each hole in the block, cleaning the bolt off as you remove it. This will remove any foreign debris from the bolt holes. I also blew compressed air into the holes to dry them off.

      39. Lightly oil the inside of the cylinder walls one last time before you put the head back.

      Installing the head
      40. This is very tricky, especially by yourself. I didn't take any pictures, but I will explain what I did. Using the three longest bolts, I cut the heads off and installed the bolts in three of the four corners. These bolts provided alignment for me to lower the head down. Once the head was down, I removed the long bolts.

      41. Using your old bolts that you hopefully labeled, hand-tighten the new bolts into the holes using the diagram in step 25. This ensures that the right bolt goes in the right hole. I put a very slight amount of assembly lube on the bolts to assist in engagement.

      42. Using the tightening order shown below, make three torque passes on the head bolts:
      1) The first torque pass should be 50 Nm (37 ft-lb).
      2) The second pass should be an additional 1/4 turn.
      3) The last pass should be an additional 1/4 turn.

      43. The headgasket is now installed with the cylinder head tightened. I hesitate to say "Installation is the reverse of removal", but that is pretty much the case. The camshaft sprocket bolt needs to be torqued to 100 Nm (74 ft-lb). Follow the instructions above in reverse. Here are some things to note:

      - Make sure the engine is at TDC and the cam plates are aligned to guarantee timing is correct before you install the chain and the cam sprocket.
      - The cam sprocket bolt needs to be torqued to 100 Nm (74 ft-lb)

      As always, let me know with any questions. Hope this helps!

      Mike

      Chapter 11 Dubs: Member #001
      http://www.chapter11dubs.com
      -----------------------

    2. 10-01-2008 07:35 PM #2
      Yes another DIY from mike. You have been busy.
      TDI for the win !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    3. 10-01-2008 07:43 PM #3
      Nice write up man.

    4. 10-01-2008 08:32 PM #4
      Well done, my friend!

    5. Member 1pt8t's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 13th, 2007
      Location
      Hermosa Beach, CA
      Posts
      322
      Vehicles
      2003 Jetta 1.8T
      10-17-2008 05:50 PM #5
      Pretty amazing DIY with awesome instructions. I still don't understand why you didn't take pictures while putting the head back on the block
      Thanks again!
      Need VAG-COM / VCDS near So-Cal / Redondo Beach? Hit me up!
      Also have boost leak tester with PRV for 2.75-3" TIP!

    6. Member RavinJetta's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 31st, 2002
      Location
      San Diego
      Posts
      7,711
      Vehicles
      2011 S4
      10-17-2008 06:50 PM #6
      Wow great writeup. Amazing how those piston look brand new again.

    7. Member adamea1635's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 11th, 2006
      Location
      Albany, NY
      Posts
      767
      Vehicles
      96 GTI(Wrecked), 94 B3 Passat VR6, 2000 Jetta VR6, 2010 Jetta
      11-06-2008 05:45 PM #7
      saved....

    8. Member gratefuldude11's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 4th, 2004
      Location
      Rochester, ny
      Posts
      3,124
      Vehicles
      1979 Porsche 924 Martini, 2000 VW Passat V6
      11-10-2008 06:59 PM #8
      this thread is amazing,
      bookmarked and sent to some friends

    9. 11-10-2008 10:06 PM #9
      great stuff!

    10. Member rain724's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 18th, 2007
      Location
      white plains ny
      Posts
      1,847
      Vehicles
      01 cabrio
      11-10-2008 10:47 PM #10
      x2

    11. Member jaredsjettas's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 24th, 2008
      Location
      Colorado
      Posts
      145
      Vehicles
      95 Jetta GLX, 06 MKV GTI, many other past lovers
      04-07-2009 10:44 PM #11
      Absolutly AWESOME!! I just did my headgasket on my mkIII VR w/ this diy and everything turned out great!!
      Thanks alot man

    12. Member
      Join Date
      Nov 27th, 2004
      Location
      Charlotte, NC
      Posts
      7,126
      Vehicles
      2000 VW Jetta VRT, 2000 Audi TT Quattro
      04-08-2009 01:45 AM #12
      Quote, originally posted by jaredsjettas »
      Absolutly AWESOME!! I just did my headgasket on my mkIII VR w/ this diy and everything turned out great!!
      Thanks alot man

      Glad I could help

      Mike

      Chapter 11 Dubs: Member #001
      http://www.chapter11dubs.com
      -----------------------

    13. Senior Member abydielsgli's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 7th, 2003
      Location
      the field of bakers
      Posts
      20,653
      Vehicles
      a few vw's and toyotas
      04-08-2009 01:48 AM #13
      Quote, originally posted by VgRt6 »
      Well done, my friend!

      i thought you had wrote the DIY until i saw you post this.

      good stuff man


    14. 07-07-2009 07:00 PM #14
      hey i have a question about my mk4 golf vr6 i love the write up first off great stuff
      if you could please give me a call 484 643 0047 i would greatly appreciate it!!
      thanks alot man

    15. Member
      Join Date
      Nov 27th, 2004
      Location
      Charlotte, NC
      Posts
      7,126
      Vehicles
      2000 VW Jetta VRT, 2000 Audi TT Quattro
      07-25-2009 10:41 PM #15
      Quote, originally posted by 01vwgtivr6 »
      hey i have a question about my mk4 golf vr6 i love the write up first off great stuff
      if you could please give me a call 484 643 0047 i would greatly appreciate it!!
      thanks alot man

      Only saw your post now...sorry about that! I sent you a text.

      Mike

      Chapter 11 Dubs: Member #001
      http://www.chapter11dubs.com
      -----------------------

    16. Member mr_e1974's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 5th, 2002
      Location
      Central, FL...the sunshine state
      Posts
      6,013
      Vehicles
      2k1/VW/GTI 12v, 99 'Vette FRC
      07-25-2009 11:15 PM #16
      great diy.
      "An AUDI is nothing more than a Volkswagen in a pretty prom dress."
      Stance will make her dance...well, try that "line" at da strip club
      Stretch is for sissies...REAL MEN love sticky meaty tires.

    17. 08-18-2009 11:21 AM #17
      Step 41. Using your old bolts that you hopefully labeled, hand-tighten the new bolts into the holes using the diagram in step 25. This ensures that the right bolt goes in the right hole. I put a very slight amount of assembly lube on the bolts to assist in engagement.

      Can you further explain how the old bolts are used in this step?

      Thanks!!!!


    18. Member joshfal's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 2nd, 2006
      Location
      new jersey
      Posts
      991
      Vehicles
      92 vw gti vr6, 01 vw gti 1.8t, 85 maserati biturbo
      08-20-2009 11:20 AM #18
      there are 3 different length bolts, by keeping the old ones in order, you simply match the length of the new bolt to the old one

    19. Member dremhmrk2's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 19th, 2003
      Location
      Fort Lauderdale FL
      Posts
      13,902
      Vehicles
      2001 Mojave GTI GLX
      08-20-2009 11:22 AM #19
      ho ho hoooo, why didnt you write this 1 months ago, before I did my timing job?
      "Turning right in fifth gear from the left hand lane into the wrong end of a one-way street while indicating left, if at all."
      All the custom, none of the cool.
      "Trying to be the cool kid is so cool." - MkIV Scene

    20. Member Govt-Cheese's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 13th, 2009
      Location
      Jacksonville Florida
      Posts
      123
      Vehicles
      99 Jetta Mk. III VR6 5 spd silver, 2002 Audi TT quattro roadster white
      10-13-2009 08:37 PM #20
      FaelinGL, this is a great writeup! This is what the Internet is for, sharing information like this, thank you very much!

      Quote, originally posted by jaredsjettas »
      Absolutly AWESOME!! I just did my headgasket on my mkIII VR w/ this diy and everything turned out great!!
      Thanks alot man

      I just wanted to confirm this, as your title is Mk. IV VR6 and I need to do the head gasket on my Mk. III GLX ('99). Are there any differences?

      Thanks again

      Eric

      2002 Audi TT Quattro roadster, white, baseball glove seats, 19" aftermarket rims, Pioneer HU with Rockford Fosgate/MB Quart speakers.
      '99 Jetta GLX. Rebuilt AAA VR6 (blown head gasket), Black Forest Stage 2 PEM, Autotech 262 cams, VWVortex's airbox mod with K&N filter, deleted cat and suitcase muffler, Pioneer HU, 17" rims.

    21. Junior Member rmetanes1's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 21st, 2008
      Location
      Israel
      Posts
      36
      Vehicles
      1998 / Golf / Vr6 / 5 door / 2.8CC
      08-09-2010 04:35 PM #21
      1st of all I have to admit and say that this writeup is great, amazing job.
      2nd, thanks for all the efort you put into it for people like me, who needs this info.

      Here's my questions though;

      you wrote in step;
      17. Note: In the following step, remove the cam timing plates. If the cams move, they could be damaged.

      1. Do you mean that at this step the 2 plats holding the cams in place are removed and theres a chance of the cams rotating, and if that happens then they'll get damaged? Even only if slightly?
      2. Once trying to remove the shorter cam's sprocket bolt, I think once the bolt break released, there might me some movement as you can not expect when it's gonna get realsed. As you are holding the Cam with one hand and trying to open the Sprocket in the opposite direction with the other hand.

      19. With the bolt removed, remove the cam gear by wiggling it back and forth on the sides. Leave the chain on the cam for now. When the cam is fully removed, tie up the chain so it does not fall into the engine. This would suck.

      1. If the chain is tied up, or zip tied up which makes it even worse (harder to rotate), when it comes to step 34 were you explained how to clean the top of the cylinders and mentioned to rotate the engine off TDC, how can that happen if the chain is tied in place?
      2. Is every crank 360 rotation enough to bring the timing alignment back to place or I should always do 720 degrees in order to keep timing aligned?

      and finally, I was told by a friend mechanic that I'm better of not cleaning the top of the Cylinder walls or Cylinder outer radius (close to the rings). Doing this hje explained might cause the compression to drop giving a result I will not like. Dirt that built up there during the years should be left alone. In the center of the Cylinder he said its ok to clean the dirt.

      Please assist.

      Thanks alot
      Rami 1998 12v vr6

    22. 09-23-2010 06:45 PM #22
      Hello last week i change the headgasket and put new head bolts on as well as getting the head pressure tested and skinned but on monday just gonna while i took of from the lights i seemed to have losted all power and the engine would not turn over so i got it towed home wiped off the head and found that number 2 cam sproget had come loose and also found that 3 of the inlet manifold ports had oil in them is this common when valve are bent or do i have a bigger problem ...?

    23. Member veedubbinn's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 25th, 2009
      Location
      Glen Burnie, MD
      Posts
      1,740
      Vehicles
      01 Jetta 1.8t (sold) 97 Jetta VRT (sold), 98 GTI (sold), 04 DBP .:R (sold) 01.5 stage 3- S4
      01-31-2011 02:41 AM #23
      Just adding too when the heads off take it to the Mechine shop and get them to check it so its not warped :-)
      01.5 S4

      Message me for new and used VW and Audi parts!
      Currently parting:
      2001 Jetta GLX VR6, 2001 Audi A4 2.8, 2003 VW Passat W8 4motion

    24. Junior Member rmetanes1's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 21st, 2008
      Location
      Israel
      Posts
      36
      Vehicles
      1998 / Golf / Vr6 / 5 door / 2.8CC
      01-31-2011 05:07 AM #24
      Quote Originally Posted by veedubbinn View Post
      Just adding too when the heads off take it to the Mechine shop and get them to check it so its not warped :-)
      +1 I think thats a MUST.

    25. Member veedubbinn's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 25th, 2009
      Location
      Glen Burnie, MD
      Posts
      1,740
      Vehicles
      01 Jetta 1.8t (sold) 97 Jetta VRT (sold), 98 GTI (sold), 04 DBP .:R (sold) 01.5 stage 3- S4
      01-31-2011 12:18 PM #25
      if you have blown a headgasket 90% chance you have a warped head, aluminum sucks
      01.5 S4

      Message me for new and used VW and Audi parts!
      Currently parting:
      2001 Jetta GLX VR6, 2001 Audi A4 2.8, 2003 VW Passat W8 4motion

    26. Member MILESisBROKE's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 28th, 2009
      Location
      Harrisburg, PA
      Posts
      497
      Vehicles
      2001 GTI VR6
      02-28-2011 10:06 AM #26
      i have one quick question.. do you need to replace the head bolts or can i use the old ones?
      Quote Originally Posted by liveschnell View Post
      pretty sure its a direct swap, i see no reason why it wouldnt just snap right in... personally id install it over the stock bumper for a lil extra support

    27. Member veedubbinn's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 25th, 2009
      Location
      Glen Burnie, MD
      Posts
      1,740
      Vehicles
      01 Jetta 1.8t (sold) 97 Jetta VRT (sold), 98 GTI (sold), 04 DBP .:R (sold) 01.5 stage 3- S4
      02-28-2011 12:33 PM #27
      You need new ones unless you have arp's there reuseable

    28. Junior Member rmetanes1's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 21st, 2008
      Location
      Israel
      Posts
      36
      Vehicles
      1998 / Golf / Vr6 / 5 door / 2.8CC
      02-28-2011 12:43 PM #28
      I did replace mine and here in Israel no one I know replaced them and the cars still go.

      I did replace them because the Gti-vr6.net and VWVortex forums have a big influence on me and they both recommended to replace them.

      I asked a couple of friends working for VW dealer ship, and one person said to replace while the other not to. I paid for them over 60 or 70 USD here in Israel but I think they're only 40 USD ion the US so, I'd say go for it! As well as I'd recommend to replace the front timing guide which is removable while only the upper timing cover is out.
      Another TIP, DO NOT and I repeat DO NOT fiddle at all with the tensioner, remove it, keep it in a clean box, return it to its place once you resume the job, DO NOT BLEED and DO NOT touch the tip / end of it that comes into contact with the timing tensioner plastic guide. If you wanna be double safe though, replace that part (tensioner bolt) too as well as inspect the tensioner plastic guide (back upper) which the bolt pushes to keep the chain under tension.

      If you wish take clear photos and I'll try to help and tell you if you should replace the plastic tensioners or not.
      In General if the tensioner bolt has no bleeding hole at the end of it where it comes in contact with the plastic tensioner, then its known to be more reliable and the rear timing plastic guide / tensioner will not have to be replaced. But if you have the bolt with the hole then theres a higher chance of you needing to replace the plastic tensioner.
      In the link below, check out the last picture at the lower most, the bolt at the right are known to be more reliable and the on eon the left less. Usually you can know which bolt is used by looking at the upper timing chain, if its a single chain its the more reliable version found on the later cars I think 96 onwards, if it's a double chain, then you'll need the bolt woth the hole at the tip, known to be less reliable timing plastic guide wise.

      http://forums.fourtitude.com/showthr...istributor-VR6

      Yes you can convert one series to another but a few parts need to be replaced including upper timing cover, guides, bolt and chain I think. Perhaps I missed something out.

      BE AWARE, that these parts, timing bolt, timing guides and tensioners, are critical, if either fail you'll have to replace and engine!!!

      I hope this info helps.

      Rami Metanes
      http://www.facebook.com/rmetanes

    29. Senior Member .LSinLV.'s Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 13th, 2009
      Location
      Vegas Bitches!
      Posts
      29,028
      Vehicles
      00' VR6T 12' V6 TDI 72' 914-6
      02-28-2011 01:10 PM #29
      Quote Originally Posted by miles485 View Post
      i have one quick question.. do you need to replace the head bolts or can i use the old ones?
      stock head bolts are single-use torque-to-spec, so yes REPLACE them as once they are used, they will not properly tq a 2nd time.

      Larry

      Demokratikally Elekted Minister of Shekels of the Independent People's Republik of Offtopikstan

    30. Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jul 16th, 2009
      Location
      Chicago
      Posts
      22
      Vehicles
      24v VR6
      04-01-2011 03:25 PM #30
      stupid question. i got a really negligible leak from the head gasket. like so small you don't see any difference in oil levels between oil changes. is it worth replacing the head gasket to fix??

    31. 04-06-2011 04:40 PM #31
      Wanted to say thank you. change my vr6 head gasket. this was more than helpful

    32. Member MILESisBROKE's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 28th, 2009
      Location
      Harrisburg, PA
      Posts
      497
      Vehicles
      2001 GTI VR6
      05-27-2011 09:59 PM #32
      Ok so me being a moron I removed the head bolt and I don't have the slightest clue where to put the new bolts. Please help!
      Quote Originally Posted by liveschnell View Post
      pretty sure its a direct swap, i see no reason why it wouldnt just snap right in... personally id install it over the stock bumper for a lil extra support

    33. Member MILESisBROKE's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 28th, 2009
      Location
      Harrisburg, PA
      Posts
      497
      Vehicles
      2001 GTI VR6
      05-27-2011 11:35 PM #33
      Nevermind on that. All is good nothing an extra hour of work couldn't figure out. For anyone else who has this issue I will post the bolt configuration later
      Quote Originally Posted by liveschnell View Post
      pretty sure its a direct swap, i see no reason why it wouldnt just snap right in... personally id install it over the stock bumper for a lil extra support

    34. Junior Member
      Join Date
      Apr 26th, 2011
      Posts
      45
      Vehicles
      95 golf gti vr6
      06-03-2011 10:27 PM #34
      Would it be same procedure for 95 2.8. Gti?

    35. Member
      Join Date
      Nov 27th, 2004
      Location
      Charlotte, NC
      Posts
      7,126
      Vehicles
      2000 VW Jetta VRT, 2000 Audi TT Quattro
      06-04-2011 09:40 AM #35
      Quote Originally Posted by Chewii89 View Post
      Would it be same procedure for 95 2.8. Gti?
      It will be close, but some of the accessory stuff will be different. The AAA used a different fiber headgasket as well, but a lot of people upgrade to the MKIV metal gasket because it will free up a couple of ponies and seal a lot better.

      Mike
      Chapter 11 Dubs: Member #001
      http://www.chapter11dubs.com
      -----------------------

    Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •