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    Thread: 02M 6 speed transmission into Rabbit Mk1

    1. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      1981 CrewCab Pickup w/ chipped 1Z TDI/6 Spd. Tran.
      04-14-2009 02:56 AM #1
      Hi All,
      After a couple years slowly gathering parts and information, I am finally installing a 6-speed 02M DRW transmission into my TDI equipped crew cab caddy. Sorry it took me so long Mr. Dave
      this will be a slow build, but I'll post pics and process as I can.
      Here's the truck with new straight hood

      and the TDI installed 35,000 miles and several years ago.




      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 9:00 AM 5-15-2009
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    2. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      1981 CrewCab Pickup w/ chipped 1Z TDI/6 Spd. Tran.
      04-14-2009 03:14 AM #2
      STEP 1: Think and gather parts
      In short: Axles, speedo, hydraulic clutch, tranny/motor mounts, shift box and cables, etc. all need to be dealt with.
      Some part numbers can be found at: http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2399546
      I'll add to this parts list as I remember all the parts I needed. Parts in parenthesis I obtained and thought about using, but ultimately did not use...yet.
      Parts:
      - 02M-DRW European transmission with complete speedo and back-up light connecters (~$1,500.00) (should have obtained the 6-speed tranny intermediate/backing/cover plate too[part numbers 038103645C AND 068103645M], but didn't think about it until too late).
      - Timing hole PLUG Part Number 02M301115B missing from my tranny
      - Transmission breather CAP part number 014301485 missing from my tranny
      - Peloquin limited slip differential and installation (~1,350.00)
      - 02M Starter ($200+ new; under $100 used).
      - 1J0711789C shift cable bracket (Holds cables onto top of tranny), with bolts. 1J0711781B may also work...according to ETKA but 1J0711789 and 789B do not fit on the DRW tranny.
      - Longest 6-spd starter bolts (7" long) to allow bolt to extend far enough to allow Mk1 front motor mount to be bolted on.
      - (02M axles with CV joints ~$100-$150 each at junkyard.)
      - 1992/93 Eurovan solid axles and inner 108 mm CV joints ($100/pair at junkyard).
      - CV to tranny flange bolts
      - (02M passenger side motor mount - came with tranny. Could be adapted with some welding to work on the rabbit frame rails, but wasn't right for me at this time)
      - 02M 6-speed shift box, boot?, shift cables with correct ends to mount to tranny, and 6-spd shift knob, and don't forget the little clips that retain the ends of the shift cables on the shift selection tower ($75-$150 used).
      - 02M 240 mm stock weight (~24 lbs I think) single mass flywheel, clutch disc, and sachs pressure plate and all bolts ~$600.00 (thank you Bora Parts).
      - Corrado/Passat VR6/G60 hydraulic clutch master cylinder and line (has pedal return spring built into master cylinder) ~$40.00 at junkyard.
      - Eurospeed (www.eurospeed.ca) hydraulic clutch pedal and support bracket ~$140 I think...see website but read below for problems I had with these pieces.
      - (2003 new beetle 6-speed hydraulic clutch master cylinder and line. Does not have return spring built into master cylinder, but has the correct clutch line connection for the 02M tranny) ~$50.00 at junkyard.
      - 1996 Honda civic clutch fluid reservoir $10.00 at junkyard.
      - 3/16" plate steel and 1.5" x 3" steel tube (1" x 2" steel tube may have worked better) ~$45.00.
      - Metric brake line flanging tool ($85.00 to $100.00).
      - Grinder and welder - priceless
      - Close cell foam or "canopy" tape for sealing clutch bracket to firewall and shift box to tunnel.
      - Cardboard and scissors for making motor mount templates.
      - Cable-X electronic to cable speedometer converter http://www.atrol.com/cablex.htm See also http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3927154




      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 9:53 PM 5-29-2009
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    3. 04-14-2009 06:46 PM #3
      Quote, originally posted by CrewCabCaddy »
      Sorry it took me so long Mr. Dave


      Now hurry up and finish it....

      Hydraulic clutch conversion parts:
      http://www.eurospeed.ca/perfor...0.htm

      http://www.eurospeed.ca/perfor...trans

      Or DIY:
      http://www.funksoulkitty.org/s....html


      -Dave

    4. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      04-14-2009 11:29 PM #4
      Thanks for the pics/links Mr. Dave...saved me the effort [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG] Plan on waiting a long time for these from Eurospeed if you order them.
      STEP 2: Remove Old Stuff, Measure, and Prepare for New Stuff
      - Remove outer axle nut on each side
      - Slightly loosen lug nuts if you are taking wheels off for more work room/access.
      - Remove both axles
      - With the car sitting normally on its tires, for both sides, measure and write down distance from the inner CV flange surface (tranny side) to spindle CV flange surface. Measure three times to be sure. This gives you a reference length for your stock axles.
      - Block rear wheels and put vehicle up on secure strong jack stands.
      - Remove hood and hook up engine to one hoist to hold in position and hook another hoist to old tranny. I like hoists because it leaves the under side open and easier to access. However, I have used two jacks, one to hold the engine and one to remove the tranny, while the car was on ramps. Hoists like this are easier!!




      - Before changing anything related tothe engine/tranny, measure engine location and angle across the engine bay. I used a 1 x 2 inch board lined up along the valve cover and resting on either fender, then marked the board location on the fenders, and measured and wrote down the distance from the board down to the valve cover at two locations.
      - Set engine at top dead center with tranny still on, and make sure it is at top dead center when you remove the old flywheel.
      - Remove original shift linkage, shift box, and 020 tranny. I removed the seats to make access easier and because I am changing carpet at the same time. I also removed carpet before working on the shift box. If you are not removing the carpet, you may have to lift/slice/remove some carpet right around the shift box to get to the shift box mounting bolts and to modify the hole in the tunnel for the 02m shift box.
      - Remove lower control arm k-bar/tie bar if you have one. I put new A-arms and bushings in since I had the front A-arm bolt out.
      - Unbolt and lower 020 tranny from vehicle with the hoist. Its easier if you slightly lower the driver's side of the engine a bit to get a downward angle, letting the tranny slide out better, under the firewall. But be careful not to lower the engine enough to smash your passenger side pulley/harmonic balancer into the passenger side fire wall.
      - Once the tranny is off, you should see something like this

      - Remove the flywheel, being careful not to let it fall off on your head, and the clutch disc and see the pressure plate. Keep it at top dead center.

      - Remove the pressure plate. I screwed a long bolt through one of the flywheel mounting bolt holes in the pressure plate, so that the bolt stuck out far enough on the back side to contact the block and keep the engine from spinning while removing/installing the 6 flywheel bolts. If oil present around crankshaft, like mine below, make sure it isn't tranny gear oil that seeped through the 020 push-rod seal. If it is tranny oil, just clean it up, but if it is motor oil, replace main seal. I also replaced the oil pan gasket while I had easier access to all the bolts.

      After a clean up and new main seal, looked much better. The main seal is REALLY easy to change on this 1996 1Z TDI motor (but expensive) because it is just a plate that unbolts and the new plate with seals bolts right back on.


      - Install new 240 mm flywheel, keeping the crank from rotating so it stays at top dead center. Before tightening the bolts, mark a location on the flywheel and on the block so you can re-align if it moves. The flywheel I received hit the backing plate and oil pan when originally bolted in. So I took it to the shop and had 4 mm taken off the back side...leaving a 100 mm center hub as seen here:

      then it fit fine and dandy:

      and the pressure plate mounts too


      - I also put a new steering rack boot on (see the rack below) and tightened up my power steering line nuts to stop some minor leaking that had been occuring. Then cleaned up the mess around this area.

      - Look around your engine bay and decide if there are other things to do while the tranny is out and there is room to move around in the engine bay. Like weld on an EGT bung, tighten the downpipe nuts, look for oil leaks to fix on back side of engine...etc.
      - Remove clutch and speedomoter cables.



      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 9:56 PM 5-29-2009
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    5. 04-15-2009 06:52 AM #5
      Cool stuff
      would you happen to have any build threads on the caddy??
      anyways good luck

    6. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      04-16-2009 04:29 PM #6
      he
      Quote, originally posted by not SoQuick »
      Cool stuff would you happen to have any build threads on the caddy?? anyways good luck

      The truck was built in 1983 by Gene Wagner of Kustom Kurves in Lodi California. It did the VW circuit down there for a few years, then was sold into hard labor at a landscaping company...and then sat idle for several years before I bought it in 2001.
      I talked to Gene several times and tried to get pictures of the build from him, but he is retired and the pictures are "in a box somewhere". so I never got any.
      The truck is essentially a 4-door rabbit cut off on the back and the pickup (from just behind the doors) was welded on. Gene said the pan matched up fine, but you can see from the picture above, he needed a swoop from the back of the rabbit up to the roof line of the pickup. So it required quite a bit of sheet metal work across the roof-line and a little way down the sides. There are supports welded in on the underside, and Gene said he welded lengthwise supports inside the "frame rail" portion of the pan. It has both gas tanks (25 gallons) both filled through the truck fuel cap, so with the new tranny I hope to have about 1,000 mile cruising range. Otherwise just about everything was stock and original when I bought it. But I have done many 'improvements" over past 8 years
      I started a thread for the TDI install, but never finished it...maybe someday I'll get back to it.



      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 3:33 PM 4-29-2009
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    7. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      04-23-2009 10:47 AM #7
      Well, to start Step 3: Hydraulic Clutch Installation, I pulled the brake master cylinder and booster off so I could install the Eurospeed clutch master cylinder support bracket. The dismantling went fine. But the bracket doesn't fit my car .
      The firewall in my 1981 rabbit has a "bump" that sticks out on the driver's side of the booster mount such that the bracket wouldn't sit flat against the firewall, and then the side firewall bolt doesn't line up. Must be different from Mk1 scirrocos...anyone know? I could have pounded the bump back into the firewall, but have really tried not to alter the body on all my other mods (its altered enough already).
      So, rather than 13 nuts/bolts off, reinstallation, and done...I spent the evening cutting up the bracket and planning to weld it back together with some additional supports.
      I am also debating whether to use the Corrado or New Beetle clutch master cylinder. The Corrado has a pedal return spring built into the cylinder, but uses 12 mm threaded connectors, so I would have to make a hydraulic line with 12 mm connectors on one end and the push-in/clip connector on the other end for the 02M. The New Beetle clutch mastercylinder has a hydraulic line that fits directly into the 02M, but I would have to rig up a return spring on the pedal. (neither of these is very difficult...just trying to lay out different options for others thinking about this swap).
      I'll post pics when I get this phase a bit farther along.


      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 7:48 AM 4-23-2009
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    8. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      04-27-2009 12:36 PM #8
      Step 3: Install Hydraulic Clutch
      Goal was to install the Eurospeed clutch master cylinder bracket and modified clutch pedal and a Corrado clutch master cylinder. Only 13 or so bolts/nuts I thought...just a short evenings work...if only it were that simple...
      - First, removed brake lines from master cylinder and drained brake fluid.

      - Then removed brake master cylinder, brake booster, and booster bracket to reveal the original brake booster firewall bracket:

      - Removed this bracket and tried to fit the Eurospeed bracket, but the new bracket did not fit flat against the rear firewall due to contours in firewall. So I cut the Eurospeed bracket to fit, welded in a new support, painted it, and installed it. Note that if you don't want the driver's side clutch master cylinder bolt to bend the firewall (firewall not flat here and bulges back into the cab) you have to install some sore of back brace that contours between the firewall and the bracket and keeps the bolt from squishing the firewall back into the bracket:

      - Then cut the hole in the firewall for the clutch master cylinder (~1 3/8" diameter hole) and bolts. Then I pulled the bracket off, painted the newly cut firewall holes and placed close cell foam on the back side of the bracket because this process is opening up a hole in the firewall that needs to be sealed to keep water out. I may also caulk the hole from the inside. Once appropriate foam seal was made up, I re-installed the bracket. I drilled larger diameter mount holes in the Corrado clutch master cylinder for bigger mounting bolts (solely to better match the size of bolt holes in the bracket) and then installed the master cylinder:

      As you can see from the above photo, the rain tray drain comes down directly onto the master cylinder...so I plan on re-routing this drain tube so that it misses the master cylinder and the new hole in the firewall. And the master cylinder view from inside the cab:

      - Then removed original clutch pedal and tried to install Eurospeed pedal. You have to separate steering u-joint from bottom of steering column to get Eurospeed pedal on. On my truck with the 1984 power steering rack, this entailed pulling the steering rack off to allow enough room for the U-joint to come off the steering column. Once the Eurospeed pedal was in place I realized that they welded the clutch master cylinder push rod attachement tab on the wrong side of the pedal and in the wrong position. The bolt holes for push rod attachment were the correct size for a bolt through attachment, but I chose to use the original Corrado clutch master cylinder push rod attachment piece, so I had to drill out the original holes to allow friction fit of original attachment piece. Here is the original pedal as received with the attachment tab on the driver's side of the pedal and too low :

      Here is the modified pedal after I cut off the original tab, measured the best location, welded it on the other side of the pedal, inserted the Corrado push rod attachment pin, and repainted the pedal. Oh, and the metal was too thick for the stock Corrado clutch cylinder rod attachment pin, so I countersunk one side of the tab before I welded it onto the pedal and pushed in the pin:

      and here is the final product:

      - install 1996 Honda Civic clutch fluid reservoir in the rain tray something like this, making sure it is mounted low enough that the cap does not interfere with the little plastic rain tray that protects the ECU


      and the clutch reservoir to master cylinder line something like this:

      and that finishes the hydraulic clutch installation other than creating/installing the clutch fluid hose from the master cylinder to the tranny and bleeding the system.
      The clutch fluid hose/line from the master cylinder to the tranny will be designed as part of Step 4 because you need the tranny in place to best route the line.
      I left the brake booster and brake master cylinder off until all else was in, so I had room to bleed the clutch master and route the shift cables....so you'll see brake booster install in a following step.



      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 8:30 AM 5-19-2009
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      04-28-2009 12:37 PM #9
      Awesome rig!
      Not familiar with the 02M yet. What are you using for spindles/hubs?

    10. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      04-28-2009 01:58 PM #10
      I explored this a bit some time ago on the Vortex:
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3741455
      but after all the thoughts/discussion it looks like I am sticking with Mk1 100 mm hubs.
      The axles have to be shortened no matter what, which means either getting custom axles made $500+ or cutting and welding up some stock axles.
      Inner CV for 02M is 108 mm.
      While it may change with more research, right now I plan on using 1991-1994 Eurovan CV Joints/axles for the inner axle half and Scirroco 100mm CV Joints/axles for the outer axle half; will cut to correct length and weld the two axles halves together.
      The reason for using the Eurovan axles is that they are solid and nearly the same diameter as early rabbit/scirroco axles, so welding them together is relatively easy. The 02M and some later rabbit axles are tubes instead of solid, thus making them a bit more difficult to weld up.




      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 10:02 PM 5-29-2009
      Last edited by CrewCabCaddy; 08-05-2010 at 11:18 AM.
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      04-29-2009 09:41 AM #11
      So the 100mm inner flanges will not fit the 02M tranny?

    12. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      04-29-2009 06:27 PM #12
      No...
      Inner 100 mm CV joints have M8 bolts and will not fit 02M tranny with 108 mm flange and M10 bolts.
      One vortexer created adapter "blocks" that bolted to the 02M flanges and were drilled and tapped to allow the 100 mm CV to bolt onto the other side. However, the way I see it, you have to shorten the axles no matter what when installing 02M into MK1, so why not weld up an axle, or have one made, with the appropriate inner CV on it.
      There appear to be several 108 mm CV joints that will bolt to the 02M trannies. I am not sure if they all have the same inner spline patterns or not.



      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 9:31 AM 5-15-2009
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      04-29-2009 10:50 PM #13
      I see your point. Could you cut the 108mm in half and weld the spline half to the outer (flange) half of the 100mm? Seems like you would have to get them balanced if it worked. If it worked you could just go with the scirocco axels/spindels.

    14. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      04-30-2009 12:13 AM #14
      Easier just to weld shortened axles in my opinion. Might be able to do what you described but the stock 100 mm scirroco or golf axles are too long to fit, so then you have welding of flange and welding of shortened axles, and still have a weaker CV joint. Doesn't make sense to double the work for less strength.
      Keep on Keepin' On

    15. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      05-03-2009 11:33 PM #15
      Well, I have the tranny in, the clutch all hooked up (but not bled yet), and the shift box and cables mounted. Shift box and cable mounting was actually easier than I expected it to be! A few minor items to clear up, like re-routing my heater hose lines, which now are in contact with the shift cable bracket...and other such needed secondary changes that result from the primary modifications. Last major step is the axles.
      But...my primary computer's operating system failed last week, so will be a few days before I can get pictures downloaded off of it and lay it all out here on the Vortex.
      No major problems in the process, just lots of time into fabricating motor/tranny mounts and trips to the VW wrecking yard for bolts, clips, connectors, and ideas. Currently fabricating a protective tunnel/holder for the shift cables.
      Keep on Keepin' On

    16. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      05-06-2009 11:07 PM #16
      Computer back up and didn';t lose any data or pictures.....

      Only axles left to build. And just received my RAAMMat BXT sound deadening for under the new carpet


      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 10:59 PM 5-26-2009
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    17. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      05-11-2009 03:29 PM #17
      Step 4: Install the Tranny and Create Mounts
      I purchased a Peloquin LSD for a good price (thanks Peter[@thescirroco.com)] and had it installed.

      02M is about 40 pounds heavier than an 020 tranny, wider and taller, but shorter. Clutch is a bit heavier and the motor mounts may add another few pounds, but not much. So I am adding about 25 pounds to each side motor/tranny mount.
      Gear ratios for the 02M DRW tranny:
      There are 2 final drives. Gears 1-4 use the first, and gears 5-6 use the second.
      1st - 3.818
      2nd - 2.105
      3rd - 1.344
      4th - 0.972
      5th - 0.910
      6th - 0.805
      Final Drive for gears 1-4 - 3.238
      Final Drive for gear 5 & 6 - 2.610
      - 02M versues 02J/02A?? This picture from another person's install, I believe I found it on TDI Club.


      - Get thin cardboard and scissors to create this piece of the rear motor mount before you put the tranny onto the motor.

      The key is to cut the metal and get the little tabs so they fit tight into the bolt recesses, before you pur the tranny into the car. After it is in the car, it is really hard to tell if everything is fitting well. Building this piece took a lot of careful grinding. The bolts in this part of the tranny have thick steel washers on them. I removed these steel washers because I figured the steel mount would serve the same purpose and it keeps the bolt at pretty close to the same original depth in the threads. The parts of this mount other than the bolt tabs will be trimmed later.
      - install tranny to motor with three primary mount bolts. Using hoist and your stick from step 1, get motor/tranny in correct position. Once i put a new rubber insert into my fabricated motor mount, the engine sat about 1/4" higher than when using the old mount.
      The tranny is tight to get in and will not fit in with a lower stress bar in place between the two front lower A-arm mounts. A scirocco K-Bar does not fit any more once the 02M is mounted. I made a custom lower stress bar from EMT I bent and flattened out on the ends so it curves down a bit from each A-arm mount, around the tranny. We'll see how it works. An Autotech lower stress bar is also a bit curved like this, but I am not sure if it would fit.
      Once the tranny is up over the lower A-arm mounts, there is a decent amount of room.
      - Create driver's side mount. I thought about using the stock 02M mount like so:

      I think it would have worked well with the upper part of the 02M mount bolted or welded to a new plate that was, in turn, welded to the frame rail. Might have needed a spacer between the upper and lower portions of the 02M mount, which would have been easy to fabricate. However, my power steering reservoir and windshield washer reservior are mounted where the 02M mount modifications would have to be made. So I elected to use the factory 020 mounting location and leave all the other changes to another time if I want to use the original 02M mount.
      - Get to the "core" of the original 020 driver's side mount:

      and

      I cleaned up this part of the mount a bit more, carefully grinding off all traces of the earlier weld. In retrospect, I may have been able to leave a small "stub" of the original mount extending off of this center "ring". This would have kept the original welding on the core ring. Welding this core ring was a bit sensitive with the old rubber mount melting and the metal seemed a bit harder than other metal.
      - Then for this "lower" portion of the new mount:

      create a piece like so:

      and bolt holes so it mounts like so:

      - Then using cardboard template like so:

      Create a piece like this:

      This piece is 1.5" x 3" thick walled tube. There is a good amount of steel ground off of the bottom and I had to clearance the side, as you'll see in a couple photos, to allow the lower driver's side bolt to be removed with a socket. From this photo you can also see about how I aligned it with the 020 center core mount. I think you could do this better with 1" x 2" tube but would need to work out a slightly different way to connect it to the center core of the original 020 mount because the smaller tube would not reach as close to the 020 mount as is shown here. Possibly, leaving a stub of the original mount (as mentioned above) would help with this?
      - Once trimmed to fit flush on top of the tranny, the tube mounts to the lower piece like this:

      - And here you can see the upper bolt mount and the weld to the original 020 motor mount core. I ended up putting a 3/16" spacer between the tube and the 020 mount to "push" the 020 mount a bit further back toward the frame rail within the external portion of the mount that is already welded to the frame rail:

      and it all fits something like this:

      - Then I welded in three additional connector/supports to the 020 mount as you see here, to increase strength and reduce torsion on the new mount, and painted it:

      In the above photo you can see the area that I clearanced for the lower driver's side mount.
      and here is the other side of the finished mount:


      - Then on to the rear mount
      I cut a piece the same width (front to back) as the rear rubber mount that extends from the passenger side of the rubber to a point aligned with the mounting bolts on the driver's side of the tranny. I put bolt holes in it so it fits on the rubber mount, and welded on an angle like so. The angle piece stops bending of the larger flat piece and fits right over the front upper edge of the rubber mount:

      Note that the welding does not extend across the inside angles of this piece. This is so it fits tight to the rubber mount.
      - With the above piece in place on the mount and on the car, pull out the original piece you created before the tranny was mounted to the engine (with the bolt tabs ready), and measure/cut the above piece to the correct length, and then cut the bolt tab piece so it mates up cleanly with the angle piece in the above picture...so it looks like so"

      Note that the bolt tab piece has a 3/16" overlap so that when you weld the back and bottom supports on, they are flush.
      - Then I welded on a back and bottom piece to stop torsional bending of the mount and painted it:

      and it fit like so (view from bottom front driver's side of car):

      and so:

      in this photo you can see the 3/4" or more between the new mount back and the power steering rack. you can also see the fit of the thin angle piece against the rubber part of the motor mount.
      Once the two motor/tranny mounts were completed, I measured, cut, and flanged (using a metric brake line flange tool), the clutch line with a 12 mm flange attachment that fits the Corrado clutch master cylinder:

      and the other half of the brake line was bent like so to fit into the slave cylinder

      The portion of the 02M clutch lines closest to the master cylinder (before the rubber portion) is larger diameter than the portion affter the rubber part, that goes into the slave cylinder. I presume this is to increase pressure at the throwout bearing with little or no extra pedal effort.
      you can also see the finished driver's side motor/tranny mount in the above photo.
      That's it for the tranny installation other than the lower portion of the tranny intermediate/cover plate, which I had to make out of sheet metal because i used the 020 plate without thinking See parts list in earlier post for the correct cover plate.
      And now on to Shift Box installation
      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 10:55 AM 6-1-2009

      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 11:02 AM 6-1-2009


      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 9:59 AM 8-28-2009
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    18. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      1981 CrewCab Pickup w/ chipped 1Z TDI/6 Spd. Tran.
      05-15-2009 01:21 AM #18
      Step 5: Install Shift Box and cables
      (Note to file: In retrospect, after the installation, it may have been better to move the shifter back a bit (cut tunnel at rear of shift box hole) instead of forward a bit as described below. This would help a bit with cable clearance on the firewall, shortened reach to the shift knob, and better fit into the Mk1 center console. But, it would mean removing one of the factory bolt holes for mounting the original shift box...choices, choices. )
      - Remove old shift linkage if you haven't already.
      - Using 6-speed shift box, create cardboard template for mounting shift box into Mk1 tunnel:

      Note, the above template is not exactly what I used. I used the bolt holes from this template, but the actual cut out of the tunnel was different than you see on this template.
      - I had to remove exhaust pipe to fit the shift box into the tunnel/hole.
      - Cut out tunnel for shift box and bolt holes. this is a view from the underside after the cut out and drilling of bolt holes:

      and this is view from the top. Note that this cutting approach leaves all the original shift mechanism bolt holes in place, so the car can be converted back to original if ever needed/wanted:

      - Then put some sort of seal/gasket around the shift box and mount using front two bolts.

      Then i created a bracket like so:

      that fits onto and holds the rear of the shift box to the tunnel like so:

      Here are a couple pics of the underside of the mounted shift box

      you can see how the exhaust pipe fits after it was reinstalled

      - then I routed the shift cables above the steering rack, to the left (driver's side) of the original shift linkage mounting tabs. this was a particularly tight fit because I have a power steering rack with p/s fluid lines that are present on top of the rack. However, it all fit relatively easily and the rubber "rub fins" on the cable extend nicely to just over the rack.
      - I then attached the shift cables to their shift tower on the tranny. This created a "push back" on the cables causing them to sag down a bit within the tunnel, between the shift box and steering rack. So I created a bracket that mounts to the original shift linkage tab, and holds the cables up, while protecting them from the exhaust pipe...like so:


      Which fit like this:


      This shift cable guide bracket worked great to hold the cables up and into the gap between the steering rack and the tunnel.
      The cables rub pretty hard on the back firewall, so I will be making a small spacer to hold them a 1/4" or so away from the firewall and keep them from vibrating and rubbing the paint off my firewall. Nothing difficult with this, any type of spacer willwork just to keep the cables away from the firewall. NOTE: After about 500/1000 miles, the cables seemed to settle in and were not rubbing against the firewall any more!
      - I installed the brake booster bracket, with new cork gasket between the booster bracket and the Eurospeed clutch master bracket, installed the booster and the master cylinder. Because the clutch master bracket moves the booster out about 3/16", the brake pedal sits the same distance further back (doesn't come up as far as before) and while this little amount isn't an issue, I did have to adjust the brake light switch so my brake lights went off when I released the brake pedal.
      Axles are being made and I have the sound deadening in and the new carpet mostly mounted. Once I finish the carpet and re-install the center gauge console, I'll provide a finished picture of the shifter inside the Mk1 center console.
      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 12:16 PM 6-4-2009


      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 9:33 AM 8-30-2009
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    19. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      1981 CrewCab Pickup w/ chipped 1Z TDI/6 Spd. Tran.
      05-15-2009 12:57 PM #19
      Updated and finished Step 5: Install Shift Box and Cables
      Axles being made. Sound deadening and new carpet almost done
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    20. Member
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      05-18-2009 10:03 PM #20
      was asking around about this and vwpat came through with this link....
      good stuff and TIA!!!! [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]
      take care,
      nash

    21. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      1981 CrewCab Pickup w/ chipped 1Z TDI/6 Spd. Tran.
      05-19-2009 04:35 AM #21
      Thanks Nashty. Hopefully the detail helps others who want to do the swap too.
      I chatted with guy doing the axles. Should be done by next week at latest. Since I decided not to do the axles myself, I won't have detailed pictures. The axles are hardened, and I don't have the tools to effectively deal with hardened steel. I could have bought some, but axles...even used ones... are expensive and I didn't want to go the trial and error route. It is possible the axles are only hardened on the outside, in which case it would have been easier...guess I'll know more after my axles are done. Learning as I go.

      Basically, the process I chose is shortening the Mk1 axles by cutting them off, keeping the Mk1 outer length/spline and then welding on a new 1992/1993 Eurovan inner portion to the correct length. Once I get the axles on and they work I'll post more detail and dimensions. Then you all will have an easier time of it.
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    22. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      1981 CrewCab Pickup w/ chipped 1Z TDI/6 Spd. Tran.
      05-19-2009 11:44 AM #22
      Crap...I was editing Step 4 and accidentally pushed the wrong button and deleted the whole step
      Guess i'll be redoing that later
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    23. 05-19-2009 01:36 PM #23
      this is really helpful! many thanks for the info

    24. Member atoson's Avatar
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      05-22-2009 04:39 PM #24

    25. Member CrewCabCaddy's Avatar
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      1981 CrewCab Pickup w/ chipped 1Z TDI/6 Spd. Tran.
      05-27-2009 03:06 AM #25
      Re-did the description of Step 4. I'll try not to delete it again
      New front wheel bearings installed and spindles/hubs back on the car. Purchased new large front outer MK1 scirocco CVs (at $140 each). A tidbit of knowldge for you, interestingly, the outer "large" Mk1 scirroco and 1985 and later CV joints are actually 90 mm in diameter and the smaller "rabbit" outer cv joints are about 80 mm. So, 100 mm inner mk1/mk2 CV joints came with 90 mm outer CV joints, while inner 90 mm mk1 CVs came with 80 mm outer CVs. I always thought the outers where same diameter as inners...but not so!
      Still have to do some re-routing of coolant/heater hoses.
      Sound deadening and carpet installed. Still need to install air bag controller (I put on a 1991 air bag steering wheel a while back and now have to hook it all up), center console, and front seats.
      Axles should be done any day now. Hope I measured correctly
      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 10:07 PM 5-29-2009


      Modified by CrewCabCaddy at 11:05 AM 6-1-2009
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