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    Thread: The complete guide on casting parts

    1. 02-25-2010 04:43 PM #71
      Update on the way soon guys, more info here(link) on what Im working at at the moment, skip through the pages, machine will also be able to skim castings etc. For anyone thats about to say a fabed machine will never beat a cast one, steps can be taken to make sure they can very much as good. In the mean time, read the link below I know you will like it, lot of stuff in there, and Talk soon Guys,

      Brian.

      http://vagdrivers.net/forums/i...39794


      Modified by chippievw at 1:46 PM 2-25-2010


      Modified by chippievw at 1:47 PM 2-25-2010


    2. 02-25-2010 07:16 PM #72
      Quote, originally posted by chippievw »
      http://vagdrivers.net/forums/i...39794

      That's just crazy! I LOVE it


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      02-25-2010 07:57 PM #73
      That's hardcore.

    4. Member wantacad's Avatar
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      02-26-2010 03:35 AM #74
      Holy moley!

      The skimmer project is

      Quote Originally Posted by WackyWabbitRacer View Post
      You're new here but don't be a DORK.....
      Cheers, WWR.
      Quote Originally Posted by rte7x9 View Post
      Don't swap if you can't weld or fabricate. It's not a trivial task just to bolt everything up. There's a lot of nut-scratching involved. Take your time and do it right.

    5. 02-26-2010 08:35 AM #75
      Thanks Guys, Hope you can see all the pics on there? Ill be running the carriage via a stepper motor and the quill travel also. Slowly but surely....back on here soon with the rest of the casting thread, as you can see, its all go!
      Updates on the link above daily.

      Brian


    6. 02-26-2010 10:58 AM #76
      dear god , most of my wonderings have been cleared up in a post. thanks a ****load !!!!

    7. 02-26-2010 11:25 AM #77
      LOL, some of mine have been too!! Ive been meaning to do all this for a long time..

    8. 03-02-2010 07:00 AM #78
      Finally located some oil bond sand for use in order to get a better finish over-all for finer items, will be pouring once it arrives. In the mean time, progress in the link above continues.

      Brian.


    9. 03-02-2010 12:19 PM #79
      i've seen this thread on your mill , man ... you fawkin rocks

    10. 03-09-2010 02:28 PM #80
      Small update, FINALLY got the exact sand I wanted for casting finer parts. I took an age to find a company that would actually sell this to a normal 5/8th..

      I can now finish the casting thread with this, as it will let me get a feel for this sand too. This sand is oil bonded sand, and not water bonded which is used for rougher castings. The oil in this sand will not boil like the other, therefore pitting on part surface is reduced A LOT.

      Also got the flux off the same crowd, this helps bring any contaminants to the surface before you rake off the dross(scum) before pouring.

      Ill update with pics later, going casting in the next few hours, at last....


    11. 03-09-2010 10:40 PM #81
      As you know I got the sand I had been waiting for the last day, its a very fine casting sand and I had to try it out because I need to get a feel for it, and how it works.
      These parts your going to see below are the first two parts Ive ever cast.
      This sand is oil bondd sand and can hold finer detail than the previous sand I did the mock test with.
      So anyways, onto the casting test...


      The layout of the pictures below are in the order I did it in, so Ill host them in that order...

      I fixed the pattern halves onto the parting plate, I had to make a new parting plate as I drove over the other one last week

      One half fixed...

      Turned upside down...

      Other half fixed, must be fixed as accurately as possible to be opposite its other half or you'll end up with a massive parting line in the finished part...

      All screws and holes filled...

      I pepped the charge in the crucible, more smashed up water pumps, there great!!...

      Test fit, and set up burner pipe...

      Next, I made the cores for the flange using the plaster core box... I need two, as the main pattern is setup for two flanges...I put a nail in the middle to make handling them easier...remember, this sand is just bonded with oil, it doesn't go off or dry, its as Is once the core box is opened, Its amazing stuff when packed...

      Full, and packed...

      Out of core box...

      And one more...

      Next, I filled the main mould...

      All filled and packed...

      Turned over the whole lot and got to work filling the top...

      Full...

      Scooped out this area to funnel in molten metal to mould...

      Lifted off top mould section...and removed parting plate c/w patterns screwed on...this is the bottom half of mould below...

      Removed the dowels and cut fill gates from dowel holes into rear of flange...this is the top section...

      Sliced a small flat area off cores as I need a bit of metal thickness in this area for flange bolt counter bores, so that a socket will fit onto bolt head, and clear flange its-self...

      Placed cores in mould...

      Made a few vent holds in top mould half before I fitted it, 2mm wire, job done, ... Top fitted, say goodbye!..

      Lit smelter...

      Takes a second to cop on and warm up then off she goes...

      After 5min...

      The next bit Ive no pictures of because Ive only two hands, and If I asked anyone to take pictures at 12 o clock at night they'd probably think I was actually demented...
      What I did was scoop off as much dross as I could, added a spoon of flux, stirred it, little more heat for a min, then raked off the rest of the dross(scum) before I poured it into mould.

      Full...

      Now...the moment of truth, were the patterns correct, did the cores collapse in main mould, did I pack it enough...

      Gave ten minutes and started digging...it filled perfect...nice...

      Lifted up, its still very hot, vent hole did its job well...

      Close-up of fill gate/runner...

      I cut them apart broke off fill gates and shook out the core sand...

      A quick run on the beltsander removed most of the flash/gates etc either end, the belt died half way through, I have to take down the flange face approx 1.5mm more yet, but thats minor...

      Close-up of extra material needed for counterbore created by shaving the core moulds...

      Few random pictures, they still need a bit of grinding/linnishing, Im extremely happy with the over-all finish direct from mould...

      You can see the flange is 1.5mm too high yet, there's a bit of material left on there so I can finish them flat...

      The bits and pieces...

      Offered up to head, looking good, hose is real snug too, tomorrow, Im going to finish sealing face, and drill holes, that should be it then, sand testing done. I may pack it even harder the next time, and give it more vent holes, see if I can get an even better surface finish, although, I suppose, its not too bad at all, for the first time.

      Im very happy all in all with the results to say the least, all went smooth, I can now get onto moulding/pattern making my intake parts. You can follow this on the link above to the Irish Vag website.

      There I will be doing more casting and loads more.
      This thread on a guide to casting Ive done here will hopefully give you a bit of insight as to whats Involed in designing, moulding, and casting parts.

      Brian


    12. Member Burnitwithfire's Avatar
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      03-09-2010 10:57 PM #82
      Very cool stuff. You should cast some aluminum waterpump thermostat housings and sell them. VW used aluminum housings in MK1s and early MK2s then switched to warping plastic flanges. They fit on most VW 4 cyl with an external waterpump. I found one by luck in a JY and swapped it from car to car because they are hard to find.

      Quote Originally Posted by SAV912 View Post
      Going to church is bland. Eating vanilla ice cream is bland. Dating somebody from your local Ayn Rand book club is bland. This car makes all of those things seem as exciting as doing 12 lines of cocaine. With Katie Perry. While she's on fire...in Times Square. And you're naked.

    13. 03-09-2010 11:16 PM #83
      yup, I sure could, and will be, Ive spent a fair amount of time cursing these too, they're terrible...

      Thanks for the reply, and hope you enjoy the pics,

      Brian.G.


    14. 03-10-2010 10:17 AM #84
      Quote, originally posted by Black Smokin’ Diesel »
      Very cool stuff. You should cast some aluminum waterpump thermostat housings and sell them. VW used aluminum housings in MK1s and early MK2s then switched to warping plastic flanges. They fit on most VW 4 cyl with an external waterpump. I found one by luck in a JY and swapped it from car to car because they are hard to find.

      I've been thinking of casting one of those with a couple of modifications most notably, provision for a drain ****.


    15. Member wantacad's Avatar
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      03-10-2010 10:52 AM #85
      Very cool

      Quote, originally posted by ABA Scirocco »

      I've been thinking of casting one of those with a couple of modifications most notably, provision for a drain ****.

      Now that's a good idea.

      Quote Originally Posted by WackyWabbitRacer View Post
      You're new here but don't be a DORK.....
      Cheers, WWR.
      Quote Originally Posted by rte7x9 View Post
      Don't swap if you can't weld or fabricate. It's not a trivial task just to bolt everything up. There's a lot of nut-scratching involved. Take your time and do it right.

    16. 03-10-2010 11:22 AM #86
      yeah true, would that drain block though, with stat still in, ive thought about this too...
      Check out the pump for the aeb 1.8t, dunno has that featured over your side, but it has a built in drain, same as the 058 block pumps, (It is one) but there one outlet short...
      I had one here, but melted it lastnight...

    17. 03-10-2010 11:27 AM #87
      Google pic, you can just make out drain nut in the rear view pic...

      notice outlets though I have a water plan of how they are different it would be easy adapt mind you...

      Brian


    18. Senior Member Muffler Bearing's Avatar
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      03-10-2010 11:31 AM #88
      Quote, originally posted by Black Smokin’ Diesel »
      Very cool stuff. You should cast some aluminum waterpump thermostat housings and sell them. VW used aluminum housings in MK1s and early MK2s then switched to warping plastic flanges. They fit on most VW 4 cyl with an external waterpump. I found one by luck in a JY and swapped it from car to car because they are hard to find.

      i dont know about out there, but over here i can go to the yard any day of the week and get 2-3 of them... alot easier than trying to cast your own.

      A Rabbit is not to be wasted on the tentative or weak. Only the worthy are invited, and then only at your own risk. If you have even a modicum of hesitation, DO NOT buy one of these cars. Instead, leave it for a worthy soul who has already matriculated to the sublime ecstasy of what those in the know refer to as a "MK1"

    19. Member Burnitwithfire's Avatar
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      03-10-2010 11:33 AM #89
      Yeah the AEB pump only has one outlet while other pumps have two.
      Quote Originally Posted by SAV912 View Post
      Going to church is bland. Eating vanilla ice cream is bland. Dating somebody from your local Ayn Rand book club is bland. This car makes all of those things seem as exciting as doing 12 lines of cocaine. With Katie Perry. While she's on fire...in Times Square. And you're naked.

    20. 03-10-2010 11:37 AM #90
      Quote, originally posted by chippievw »
      yeah true, would that drain block though, with stat still in, ive thought about this too...

      It would be rather slow but it would drain. If you wanted to speed it up, you could drill a couple extra small holes in the thermostat, that would allow the block to drain faster without seriously compromising the function of the thermostat.

      On a completely unrelated note, that core made out of molding sand seems to have worked well for you. Do you think you'll be able to use it for larger more complex cores? Or do you think will you be forced to use some type of hard setting binder system such as sodium silicate/CO2?


      Modified by ABA Scirocco at 11:38 AM 3-10-2010


    21. Member wantacad's Avatar
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      03-10-2010 12:02 PM #91
      Quote, originally posted by Muffler Bearing »

      i dont know about out there, but over here i can go to the yard any day of the week and get 2-3 of them... alot easier than trying to cast your own.

      I'll take one then. You should know by now parts are scarce anywhere outside of the west coast or PA.

      Quote Originally Posted by WackyWabbitRacer View Post
      You're new here but don't be a DORK.....
      Cheers, WWR.
      Quote Originally Posted by rte7x9 View Post
      Don't swap if you can't weld or fabricate. It's not a trivial task just to bolt everything up. There's a lot of nut-scratching involved. Take your time and do it right.

    22. 03-10-2010 12:30 PM #92
      very nice results!!!!! nice to see those water pumps are reincarnated into water flanges lol

    23. 03-10-2010 01:08 PM #93
      Mufflerbearing> ''i dont know about out there, but over here i can go to the yard any day of the week and get 2-3 of them... alot easier than trying to cast your own''

      Not so here either, Ive never saw one and Ive have had my hands on a lot of Vws,,,,plus, this is a test item, Ive far crazier things planned.

      @ ABA, sand is far better than ive ever dreamed, I currently have a 11/4 diameter tube 10'' long sitting on my bench, with just some coat hanger Wire down the centre, didn't stir yet and its there 16hrs. Supported either end.

      The sand also can be carved like foam, with a knife when packed. Ill be keeping the c02 cure for special work only, Im very happy with the oil bond.

      Brian.


    24. 03-10-2010 02:38 PM #94
      Quote, originally posted by chippievw »

      @ ABA, sand is far better than ive ever dreamed, I currently have a 11/4 diameter tube 10'' long sitting on my bench, with just some coat hanger Wire down the centre, didn't stir yet and its there 16hrs. Supported either end.

      The sand also can be carved like foam, with a knife when packed. Ill be keeping the c02 cure for special work only, Im very happy with the oil bond.

      Brian.

      SWEET! I should see if find some locally. If you don't mind me asking, how much did you pay for yours?


    25. 03-10-2010 02:55 PM #95
      I paid 11euro(Dollars?) for each 25kg bag. Its settles like hell to, when you spill it out and mull it theres twice as much!! Only took about 1/4 of bag to fill both cope and drag above!

      Brian


    26. 03-10-2010 03:22 PM #96
      One Euro's worth somewhere around $1.40 so that works out to $15.40 a bag, imo, that's an EXCELLENT price.

    27. Senior Member Muffler Bearing's Avatar
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      03-10-2010 03:24 PM #97
      Quote, originally posted by wantacad »

      I'll take one then. You should know by now parts are scarce anywhere outside of the west coast or PA.

      ive tried selling some of the extras i had for 10-15 shipped and had zero interest... i think i threw some of them away but i probably have 1 or 2 left.

      how that i know they're wanted, $45 shipped

      A Rabbit is not to be wasted on the tentative or weak. Only the worthy are invited, and then only at your own risk. If you have even a modicum of hesitation, DO NOT buy one of these cars. Instead, leave it for a worthy soul who has already matriculated to the sublime ecstasy of what those in the know refer to as a "MK1"

    28. 03-10-2010 03:48 PM #98
      Quote, originally posted by ABA Scirocco »
      One Euro's worth somewhere around $1.40 so that works out to $15.40 a bag, imo, that's an EXCELLENT price.

      I'll modify that, that's an unbelievable price, I just got an email response from a local supplier and they want $160 for a 50 kg bag


    29. 03-10-2010 03:49 PM #99
      Wasnt it? I couldnt believe it, got them shipped from the uk to Ireland too, for damn all. They also had drossing flux too, in powder form which I prefer as the tablets are messy for breaking small bits off. 1kg of flux 6euro!
      Also, sand comes pre-mulled too, although I mulled it some more.
      I really like it. If you run Into bother locating some let me know, I mean even if you had to pay 100dollars postage if I were to send you some I still honestly think its well worth it. Id give 100euro per 25kg for it if I had too!

    30. 04-07-2010 02:06 PM #100
      Just another example Guys for this thread, may as well.
      Im making a girdle for my block, Ive seen and worked on blocks with these fitted and they really quieten the block regardless of hp. The metal ones you can buy are out of my budget at approx 380euro, and they are just 6mm steel so I thought I might as well have a shot at making my own. This engine will be dry sumped so it also suits me to drop the block skirt level below the swing arc of rods. Ill make the dry pan simpler for me.

      Anyways, enough chat, here it is>

      Onto the pattern, this is pretty simple, Ill be casting this using the lost foam method, that is, you make the pattern in the modelling foam taking all clearances etc into account, you then pack the sand around the foam shape, you can then pour directly down into foam to make the part. The molten metal vaporises the foam pattern on contact and fills the void it created in the sand, In this case the crank girdle.

      Sump outline...

      Mocked up with a 2.0l crank...you can see its pretty tight around pump body...

      The caps sit lower than the bottom lip of block, and the bolt counterbores lower again, this means Ill have to step down the girdle to meet it, but that wont be too bad...

      Marking out...

      Fits ok...

      Number 4 conrod nut hits it, but this is the 2.0l crank, so the 1.8l crank will drop it a bit more, Ill can sand the foam anyway for final fitment/clearance, and indeed the alloy with a carbide burr in spots if I need to...

      Foam cut(Full thickness)

      Cutting down to required thickness, With everything, it stays flatter if you take the same amount off each side, this applies to nearly all material incl steel blocks...

      Screwed down under template...

      Again, 10mm bit and 14mm guide bush in router...

      Cuts very nice, nearly as well as MDF...

      Laid down to see...

      Needs a bit of clearance for pump body as it sits at an angle...

      In...

      I have to lighten it up a bit yet in spots where I know I can, Ill be using another template to do so, and a half moon router bit but its nearly there. Ill also be checking clearances for a final time as I should have the 1.8 crank in a day or two.

      Girdle pattern finishing pics>

      Lightened it up in a few spots, just made up another jig to rout out the pockets. This is done both sides.

      Sanded at all edges...

      Screw holes plugged...

      Approx alloy cc calculations, Ill need extra too for risers etc...

      This is a complex pour in order for it to all come out ok, Im going vent it well, and put a few risers at the thicker spots. Ill also be feeding with 3 gates, and maybe 3 or 4 chills near pattern, in sand to aid solidification at the farthest points from gates. The problem is, you have to plan the best place for the colder metal flow fronts to meet, the bond isn't as strong at these points so they have to be in non stressed areas of the part.
      I just have to attach the pads on the underside for the bolt pads and its ready for the hot stuff.

      Sprue's...

      Tagged together while glue dries...

      5 risers fitted...

      The risers will be approx 2 inch below the surface of sand and a vent hole leading down to them to vent smoke. There will also be multiple vents around the part to also vent smoke from vaporised foam, failure to vent properly can lead to a ruptured mould. The 3 sprues(fillers) Will be fed from one trough approx 9'' long, and semi circular. This should keep the sprue's molten until last so that the part will be fed from it while it cools. The risers should stay molten the fact that they are blind(not coming to the surface of sand) Ill also insert chills, these are just metal block/off cuts, they are placed near the mould at whatever points you want it to solidify first. They are Important tools in the control of casting as you can then pick where you want to solidify first, usually the thicker areas, so that they cool rapid, and dont have to be fed until it is all solidified.

      The pads on that will space down onto main caps, these are just little bits of pipe spacer in the commercially available Vw girdles...
      Pads were ran off in one length and I just cross-cut off ten of them.

      Cap in place, you get the idea...bit left on them for machining etc..

      Cut up the AHW block a bit(1.4 16v, dunno if you guys got these in the Us?, got a surprise actually which slowed me down a bit, its got dry liners, which I never knew. I thought these were Nikasil(electro deposited lipophilic nickel matrix silicon carbide) coated alloy bores, but they aint, there cast iron dry liners. Ill also add that this engine that the block came from had the famous 1.4 16v knock, I can say that the liners, the rings, or the pistons had not an ounce of wear on them, ZERO. So Im not fully sure why these burn oil and knock like they do, Ill have to study the rest of the parts until I come up with a reason.
      The big end shells were also mint.
      Also, before I pulled crank I datumed off points along the block around the main cap areas with the parallels and the dial gauge , on removing the crank I re-checked, there was no differences in both sets of figures, Indicating that ''the blocks will warp if you pull crank'' story may not be true. Im confident its not true at this point.

      Anyway, a few pics of the famous 1.4 block before I start to melt it down to in order to make it into parts that will actually be good

      You can see here after one cut part of the liner chipped off, it was at this point I had to re-think things, I actually thought the lot would be useless but I discovered that the liner actually comes away from casting pretty easy. These are NOT pressed in like some dry liners, but moulded in at the time of pouring.

      Alloy jacket on the left, liner sleeve on the right...

      Time to get down to it and split it right down the middle...

      Split, and liners removed, they came out pretty handy with a small bit of help, back to 100% all usable alloy again, no waste.

      These are really odd engines, and the problems that go with them, the alloy block would not help in the deadening of any knocking or tapping that would occur though, unlike its cast Iron counterpart which is excellent at deadening. Which could be a lot of it, sounds that may go unnoticed in a cast iron block would show themselves easier in the above block. And twice as much given the fact that its open deck too. Ill have to examine the rest of the bits and try figure it all out. I have all the other parts incl head.

      Bit off topic as always, but interesting non the less. Plenty of alloy in it I have to say, which is why cutting it up came about.


      Filled any sharp corners with wax to give the finished part stronger lines where it changes thickness upto pads...

      Making the new taller, larger cc crucible, the full guide is in the casting thread on the first few pages, its the very same construction, but done in 15min...

      Because this part has the little cap steps in the bottom and the indents I couldn't just leave it on a flat bottom bed of sand so I had to think of a way to reverse fill, and with the risers and sprue's in place, so I did...
      Marking their positions on a flat board...

      Drilled and chamfered...

      Fits, and sits flat...

      The outer lower frame test fitted...

      Laid up on blocks to protect the risers/sprues from the floor level...

      Filling...

      I filled it as above and turned it over...

      Lifted off board with all the holes and test fitted top frame, you can see it filled good all round pattern, tamping the sand is a boring job, but it pays off...

      With the top frame test fitted I removed it again and raked a groove all round the pattern so that the top layer of sand would interlock with the bottom, and so that no metal could possibly find its way out...

      Vents inserted, I just used welding rods, its amazing how hard it is to find straight wire when you want it, they'll be grand for re-use again after...

      I removed a few later as they were in my way for the 3 sprues but theres still plenty.

      Chills inserted(heatsinks) These suck the heat from the thicker areas that are not near the sprue or risers, remember these risers and sprue's fill the part as it cools(shrinks) so any areas away from them don't get fed, so they need to be cooled first and fast so they don't shrink. I guessed there positions with what felt right by spending a while looking at it.

      Now, this is why it took me so long, and why its so late...I ran short of sand which led to a lot of problems. I couldn't reach the tops of the risers, vents, and sprue's with the amount of sand I had so I had to heighten them without sand...this wasn't fun and took ages. I've more sand on route but its not here yet. Keep in mind I had another pour going on at the same time as this which took a fair bit of sand too. I chose to compromise on my mould and used what I had because I wanted the other parts 100% and wouldn't take short cuts with them as they were for someone else.

      You can see the pipes I used to rise everything in order to gain head height for the molten alloy, more head height is always good, both for pressure, and the amount of alloy you have stored to feed things as the part cools...even the vents had to be raised, as one low vent, and all your alloy (stored height) flows out it. Lowering the level across the full mould, = Bad.

      Fits good, its now the same height as the refractory lining, the max I can go with this smelter, but it holds A LOT of alloy...
      I didn't take any pictures of the melt, or it lit, sure your well used of seeing them now!

      Poured, you can see the various bits in mould I used to try and take up space in order to give me more sand where I wanted it! Talk about running tight.
      It vented very well, and I got flames in all the risers, I pretty much knew at this point that it was 100% inside mould. They all lit at pretty much the same time which also meant that the riser(fill positions) were pretty good also. I spent a long time thinking about there positions and how the metal would flow at various points inside the mould. Spending time doing this pays off in the long run.

      Gave it about 8mins and started clearing...

      Lifted out, you can see it filled perfect, with no voids, cold fronts meeting, or low spots, I was very happy when I saw this, makes me think that foam is a brilliant way to cast one off parts from now on as it holds detail very well, is easy machine, and is quicker to mould as you dont have to split mould boxes to remove pattern.

      Gun was showing it was still at 400 degrees! Gave it a bit of a wire brushing to recoup as much sand as I can...

      Topside, vents just snap off easy, the chills also worked well as you can see as there is no shrink in the areas away from sprues/risers.

      Got the risers and sprues cut off and it brushed up a bit,

      The various light passes in the machining stages..

      Gave the indents a light pass to to clear them out if anything else, same template that I used to cut the foam pattern...had to finish at that as I ran out of wd40, Ill post pics when done,


      Enjoy folks, I certainly did. All the research on casting Ive done over the yrs is finally being put to use, I thought Id never get a chance B)

      Brian.G





      Modified by chippievw at 11:07 AM 4-7-2010


    31. 04-07-2010 02:10 PM #101
      Also, using foam means you have no draft angles to worry about when it comes to removing pattern, cos you dont have to. Complex shapes can be made, I need to sieve my sand and re oil after this one as there was a lot of metal in this and it burnt off a lot of oil.

      Ive another part which I cast also for my slide throttles which Ill add later, I cut the thread a bit short after casting the flanges as I was very busy, but I saved all my work so Ill share now that Ive a bit of time to do so again

      Brian.G





      Modified by chippievw at 11:30 AM 4-7-2010


    32. 04-07-2010 03:39 PM #102
      Brilliant as always, thanks for sharing.

    33. Member yeayeayea's Avatar
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      04-08-2010 12:38 AM #103
      good lord.

      impressive to say the least


    34. 04-09-2010 07:34 AM #104
      Quote, originally posted by ABA Scirocco »
      Brilliant as always, thanks for sharing.

      Your pretty good at this type stuff yourself
      @ Yeayeayea, thanks man

      Another example, this time the top section of my slide throttle pattern, I drew out these first hence the drawing in some pics, its got my name on it, not an advert, just there because its my drawing

      Knocked this up in a half hour, its the pattern for the slide throttle top plate...

      Spars sanded, notice profile so it will all release from sand, the circles/trumpet stands are tapered too, as are sides of main plate...

      Sanded and on...

      First line of spars fitted, these will give the plate great strength when done, as the main body of plate is just 10mm thick...

      Second line done...

      And end bits...

      Superglue applied to all internal corners, it provides a nice radius and takes away the sharp corner that could lock in sand...

      Nearly done...

      One or two little bits to fix on yet before I pour, but its 98% of the way there...

      going to give it a coat of shellac to make it nice and smooth and Im going to hit it with some 710 degree alloy then.

      The two hooks you see along the top edge are to hold the idle and WOT stops.
      The 4 little square/pads are something I want to have on there too, They will be the base mounts for the two brackets holding the fuel rail when run in stand-off injector mode. I intend running that mode on my 16v head.
      Going to pour in a while.

      The 2 new mould boxes I had to run off, the alloy ones I used doing flange are too short. The bottom mould box does nothing in this case really, its just a flat bed of sand.
      Ill take a few snaps of filling them anyway.

      This part is dead easy compared to the flange, because I have designed it in such a way that its all on the top side of mould halves, therefore there will be no parting line on finished item.

      The mould Prep, I couldnt be bother smashing more pumps as the last one flew and nearly took my head clean off so I chopped up the 2.0l intake instead, Vw would be so proud

      Notice where they split into 4....hmmmm...

      They more or less all fit into crucible now...

      Loaded, Ive worked out that the crucible has to be full to 115mm but I can add more scrap as this melts...

      Bottom box tamped and raked off flush...

      Starting to fill top box...

      Filled...

      Turned up on its edge to remove pattern...

      Pattern out, gated, and vented...

      Laid down onto bottom box again(flat sand surface)...


      I forgot to add above, I had to make the lower box wider after that as the gate was very near edge and I was afraid it would burn through timber, that would mean Id have 1/2 litre of molten alloy around my shoes...not good, 5 min had it changed, and the same width as the top box...

      Away we go again...

      Lot of smoke in the next few pictures as they are taken as its happening, but there not too bad...

      I was a bit cheeky not using a riser too, but these will be bored out anyway so the little hollow doesn't bother me. Just to clarify, a riser is like the fill hole, once the mould is filled the riser fills too, you then have two reservoirs of molten alloy to supply part as it cools, alloy shrinks when It cools so it needs to be fed as it does so. I actually thought it would sink deeper on the ones farther away from fill hole but it didn't. These will be bored out but its worth a mention.

      Things are still extremely hot so forgive the tools all over the place, its way too hot to touch yet...

      Close-up of stand-off injector bracket platform...

      One poor pic trying to display its flatness...there'll be more...

      Should all look pretty 'new' with the kevlar trumpets, not that you'll see them as the carbon fibre plenum will cover them...

      The throttle stop adjuster brackets turned out in the right place...

      Small bits of flash to clean up with a small file, gate to grind off, and a few other bits to do to it yet but Im very happy.
      It should be starting to make sense now...I hope...!

      set to work datum machining top plate...

      I left plate down on a piece of 12x4 teak Ive had for ten yrs, its perfectly flat and conditioned.
      Under plate there is 2 pieces of .5mm shim steel under one end, and one piece the other end. This is done on the first machining operation with all cast parts in order to get a datum face. The 3 shims ensure the part sits flat, you'll never see a 3 legged stool rock Which is why they have 3 legs.
      You'll see these 3 datum points cast into a lot of parts if you look hard.
      Heres an oil pump bottom section, you can see the 3 tabs they used to fix it on when milling the top face...these tabs were cast on, but I just used shim steel underneath as I had a pretty flat surface to go off unlike the oil pump.

      In the jig, shims underneath plate, I used screws and washers to hold down onto plank, these are out of sight under the guide runners for router...

      First roughing pass followed by I think 3 more...

      Finish pass, again taken at .25mm...

      Laid out and marked positions for stand-off brackets...

      Pilot bored...

      Taken out to 5mm, these will be tapped for an M6 allen hex bolt...

      Plated turned over and 5mm holes countersunk, the plate is now perfectly flat on the top face (checked with 10mm glass and water) so I can now datum machine the bottom face off it...

      First pass at .25mm shows the slight high spots...

      Second pass taking off .5mm and the plate is completely surface machined, minimal material removal to get it all surfaced with is good. A small bit of shrink exists on the bottom too under trumpet stands, this will be bored out so its no harm. Combating this shrink is mentioned above earlier.

      And laid down on bottom plate shows they are 100% true to each other...

      Im going to pin them together later with some positioning dowels so I can set out Idle hole drilling's in both, I can then start tapping holes, etc, Im going to clean up the small bit of mould flash around edges, and bore the two Idle and WOT tabs too.

      Youll never look at a machined cast part in the same way again!! Its the very same process In the factories, but with mass production machine and jig lines.


      Brian.



      Modified by chippievw at 4:37 AM 4-9-2010


    35. Member Bazmcc's Avatar
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      04-09-2010 07:47 AM #105
      Excellent work as usual Brian.

      I'm looking forward to seeing how the trumpets go on there. It's amazing to watch how stuff like this gets made and how small details can be quite often overlooked by some aftermarket parts manufacturers.


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