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    Thread: DIY: a complete guide to convert your chipped 1.8T to run on E85 FlexFuel ethanol (in 4 easy steps)

    1. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      02-28-2010 11:35 AM #1
      First off, I want to thank theswoleguy, 20aeman, gre9del and all of the helpful VWvortex vendors mentioned below. A lot of the ideas and instructions below are borrowed, and I wanted to give credit where it's due. Theswole guy has a great post with general information about E85, a 1.8T-specific FAQ, and details of his experiences using E85, which can be found here: http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3866545.

      Below are detailed instructions for the 4 steps needed for E85 conversion: installing a Walbro 255lph inline fuel pump, swapping out the stock MAF for a 3" VR6/TT225 MAF, replacing the stock fuel injectors with 630cc ones, and tuning the whole thing. You will need all of parts listed below, most of the tools mentioned, and some mechanical aptitude. I assume no responsibility for you performing this procedure or the negative impact it may have on you or your car. *Proceed at your own risk!!

      Parts Needed: (and recommended places to get them)

      -Walbro 255lph inline fuel pump with basic install kit (Clay@CTSturbo has a great deal going on now, $320 shipped for 4 630s and the Walbro pump, http://www.ctsturbo.com/produc....html)
      -Walbro/MK4 relay wiring harness (optional, if you would rather save money and assemble this yourself, I recommend just paying the $65 here: http://www.usrallyteam.com/ind...d=412)
      -Siemens/Deka 630cc fuel injectors (recommend purchasing from CTS along with Walbro pump above)
      -Fuel rail spacers and extended bolts for aftermarket injectors (CTSturbom, USRT, ECS and others carry this)
      -VR6 or TT225 MAF housing
      -VR6 or TT225 airbox, or an intake that can attach to the 3" MAF housing
      -3" silicon coupler
      -3/8" fuel line hose clamps (2 or 4, depending on..)
      -3/8" fuel injection hose (optional, but makes installation easier)


      Tools Needed:
      -computer with an OBD2 cable and VAG-COM installed
      -multi-meter or volt-meter
      -Torx and Torx Plus/TS security bits ( http://www.amazon.com/Silverhi...r=1-5 )
      -long reach allen keys
      -assorted sockets and drivers
      -assorted screwdrivers
      -crimp tool
      -Exacto knife
      -telescoping magnet (optional, but helpful)
      -pick/hook set (optional, but helpful)
      -coat hanger
      -electrical tape

      STEP 1: Walbro Inline Pump Install

      1) Make sure you have all the parts you ordered, and all the tools you’ll need, especially if you don’t have a backup vehicle to make a parts run. Pay close attention to the little nuts and washers that came with the pump, o-rings on the injectors, etc.

      2) Inside the car, remove the 3 torx head screws securing the lower kick panel on the driver’s side. Two of these screw positions are shown in the picture above; the third is off to the left.

      3) Remove the kick panel by pulling downwards on the front edge, and then pulling the whole panel towards the rear of the car and out of the white sandwich clips near the pedals.

      4) On the right side of the relay panel, locate relay position “87F/Diesel,” this is where we will be tapping to switch the new inline pump relay on.

      5) Using a multimeter or volt meter, confirm that when the key is switched to the on position, this relay goes hot (12V) for several seconds before returning to 0V. This can be tricky if you are working by yourself, but can be done.

      6) Start the car up, and then pull fuse #28 from the panel on the end of the dash. Doing this will disable the stock fuel pump, causing the motor to stall and relieving the injection lines of most of their pressure.

      7) Remove the key from the ignition, and disconnect the battery.

      8) Locate a suitable place to mount the new pump relay. My car had an unused stud near the factory airbox.

      9) Locate a nut and washer to be used on the stud from your collection. You’ll need a M6x1.0 nut and M6 washer if you use this location.

      10) To make installing the relay easier (and since it will be coming out later anyways), remove the factory airbox. This is done by disconnecting the plug going to the MAF sensor, undoing the hose clamp on the MAF, disconnecting the SAI line going to the airbox, and removing the two allen head cap screws or bolts securing the airbox to the car.

      11) With the airbox out of the way, you can now use a ratchet and deep socket to install the relay, washer and nut to the stud coming off the fender.

      12) Remove the four Philips head screws holding the headlight covers in place, and remove both halves of the cover.

      13) Begin routing the wiring harness over to the passenger side of the vehicle. Learn from my mistake and route the harness UNDER the hood release cable. Replace the inner headlight cover, and you will notice a conveniently located notch that allows the harness to pass through and holds it in place.

      14) While routing the harness across to the passenger sides, use zip-ties to keep everything pinned up above the radiator and away from hot and moving parts.

      15) Once over near the passenger side headlight, I dropped the harness down to where the motor mount is, and then routed it up between the power steering and coolant overflow reservoirs to the fuel lines where the pump will be located.

      16) Going back inside the car, use an Exacto knife to make a small slit in one of the grommets running through the firewall. If you already have a vacuum line for a boost gauge running through like I did, this step isn’t necessary. Using a straightened out coat hanger, poke through the opened grommet and into the engine bay. Working under the hood, route the yellow wire from the new relay harness beneath the airbox, hoses, and other wires in the engine bay, and attach it to the end of the hanger with some electrical tape. Back inside the car, slowly pull the hanger back through the grommet, hopefully with the yellow wire still attached.

      17) Pull enough of the wire through so that it can be cleanly routed away from the pedal assembly. Attach a crimp-on ring connector to the end of the wire large enough to fit on the relay terminal stud. Remove the nut, and reinstall along with the yellow wire.

      18) Back under the hood, remove the 10mm nuts on both the positive and negative battery cables, and attach the one red wire in the new harness to the positive terminal, and the two black wires to the negative terminal.

      19) The inline fuse holder included with the new harness can be mounted to the top lid of the battery fuse box. Position the holder and mark where it will attach with a scratch awl or similar. Find a very short self tapping screw and a washer or two. With the screw installed, you want to make sure that it just barely goes through the lid and doesn’t come in contact with any of the fuses.

      20) Begin preparing the Walbro inline pump for installation by installing the sound deadening sleeve onto the pump, and removing the red plastic caps on the inlet and outlet.

      21) Install the included hose barbs onto the pump. The barbs themselves are 5/8”, and the pump is between ½” and 9/16”, which I didn’t have so I used an adjustable crescent wrench.

      22a) *Option 1: if your fuel lines are newer and in good shape, you can try installing the pump onto your existing lines. Use an Exacto knife to cut the FEED line (this is the one with the black right angle connector, shown above, going to the fuel rail pipe with the stamped forward arrow). Your want to make your two cuts slight after each bend in the hose, allowing enough room for the length of the pump. Some fuel will come out when you make your first cut, so you’ll want to have a cup or rag beneath to catch.

      22b) *Option 2: if your fuel lines have seen better days, or refuse to stretch over the new pump’s hose barbs, you’ll prefer this route. Remove the feed line completely from the car. At the rear end, remove the quick connect elbow by pressing in the little button and pulling upwards. To avoid breaking this extremely hard to find and very expensive connector like I did, I recommend removing the metal clamp with a pair of needle nose locking pliers, and then gently make a cut lengthwise in the hose so that it can be easily pulled up. The hose seems to bind over time to the connector, and twisting and pulling is NOT the way to go. At the fuel rail end, move the easier to work with spring clamp, and remove the hose from the pipe, using some curved jaw pliers to assist in twisting the hose free if needed.

      23) You will want to replace the fuel line with 3/8” ID “Fuel Injection Hose.” The injection part is crucial, as regular fuel hose or vacuum hose is not reinforced and is not rated to the 100+ PSI working pressure needed. Goodyear and other reputable companies produce this hose in rolls, or sold on the shelves in 18” pre-cut lengths. You may need to go to a specialty auto parts store, as this is not always carried at Pep Boys and the like.

      24) Using the 3/8” fuel line hose clamps, secure two lengths of the fuel hose to the barbs on the pump. Position the pump in the car, with the electric terminals facing the front of the car, and install the lines onto the fuel rail and the quick connect elbow using fuel line clamps.

      25) Looking at the case of the pump, you will see a “+” and “-“ stamped in marking each terminal. Place the wire’s ring connectors onto the appropriate terminal, and using masterful manual dexterity, install the included star washers and 8mm nuts.

      26) At this point, finish up the installation by re-installing the headlight cover, dash kick panel, and making sure all your new wiring is secure. If you plan on continuing the conversion later and would like to use your car in the meantime, install the stock airbox and the connectors and hoses going to it. Otherwise leave the airbox out. Reinstall fuse #28 and reconnect the battery. Use a combination of door openings and key switching to the on position to prime the fuel pumps several times. Check underhood for the smell of fuel, and look closely at all the hose/barb junctions for leaks.


      Last edited by 4ceFed4; 01-01-2011 at 03:24 PM. Reason: Updated image URLs

    2. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      02-28-2010 11:36 AM #2
      STEP 2: Siemens/Deka 630cc Injector Swap

      **Gre9del has already done an excellent write-up on swapping the injectors here: http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3386087. I have added some of my own insight to the process and took my own pictures, hopefully it helps.

      27) Prepare for this installation by removing both factory engine covers, if you have them. If you have run your car since upgrading the fuel pump, start your car, then remove the new inline fuse attached to the battery cover, and then fuse #28 from the dash end fuse panel. Disconnect the battery.

      28) Remove the connecter going to the IAT sensor on the intake manifold. Squeeze both sides of the metal clip and pull out to release.

      29) Remove the vacuum line going to the FPR by removing whatever hose clamp is on the line, and then pulling the hose straight off.

      30) Remove the feed and return line hoses going to the fuel rail. These lines were “stuck” to the fuel rail tubes pretty good on my car, giving them a gentle twist with some curved jaw pliers first worked great.

      31) Remove the four electrical connectors going to the fuel injectors by squeezing the metal portion of the clip and pulling the connectors off in pairs.

      32) Separate the plastic tunnel housing the fuel injector wiring from the fuel rail. Using both hands, gently pry the plastic arms latching around the top and bottom of the fuel rail outwards, and pull the tunnel off and out of the way of the fuel rail. This is a little tricky and takes some maneuvering, so just take your time.

      33) Remove the two 8mm allen head cap bolts holding the fuel rail down by using a long reach 8mm allen key or equivalent. Use the telescoping magnet to remove the two bolts and washers.

      34) Now you can pull the fuel rail attached injectors out of the intake manifold. Using two hands, pull the assembly straight out using even force. You can try gently rocking the rail back and forth to help loosen the injector seats.

      35) Flipping the fuel rail over, you will see the four injectors. I removed and replaced each one by one by first carefully removing the metal retaining clip with a small screwdriver (be careful not to drop these into the engine bay!), and then twisting and pulling the old injector out.

      36) For two out of my four injectors, the o-ring did not come off with the injector, and I used a small hook tool to retrieve these from the fuel rail. Check each injector when you remove it to make sure it has 2 o-rings, one on each end. Once you know all o-rings are accounted for, put a little motor oil on the o-rings of the new injector and push it into the fuel rail until the last notch is just above the lip. Replace the securing metal clip.

      37) You will see while installing the new injectors that they are noticeably taller than the stock units. This is corrected for by using the fuel rail spacer kit you thoughtfully purchased. You can see the newer bolts and spacers to the left, and original bolt and washer to the right in the lower pic.

      38) Being very careful not to drop any parts into the depths of the engine bay, place the new fuel rail spacers between the fuel rail and the manifold, and then using a magnetized long reach allen key or telescoping magnet, install the hold down bolt for the fuel rail. Tighten the bolts down to 7 ft-lbs.

      39) Clip the wiring tunnel back onto the fuel rail. Reinstall the vacuum line onto the FPR, the IAT connector, the feed and return lines onto the fuel rail. Reinstall the fuel pump fuses, and reconnect the battery. Be sure to check everything you touched for leaks once completing your preliminary tune below and starting the car for the first time. I recommend priming the fuel pumps several times before starting, both the pressurize the lines for an initial leak check, and to assist in that first start.



      Last edited by 4ceFed4; 01-01-2011 at 03:26 PM. Reason: Updated image URLs

    3. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      02-28-2010 11:37 AM #3
      STEP 3: VR6/TT225 MAF Housing Install

      40) For this step of the conversion, you will be using the mass airflow sensor housing out of an Audi TT 225 or a 12V or 24V (non-R32) VR6. You will be re-using your stock sensor in the new housing, which may require one or both of the specialty bits shown above. As the 5-point tamper-proof (TS) bits are hard to find, as an alternative you can use a pair of needle nose locking pliers or similar to grab the outer edges of these screws and twist them out. The newer 6 point screws are “T20” size, and the older 5 point screws found in many 12V VR6 MAFs are “TS25” size. If you are having trouble removing the 5-point screws, PM me and I will loan you the correct bit for a refundable deposit plus postage.

      41) You have four options for the intake you will use after the new 3” OD MAF housing. Shown from left to right above, you have the TT225 airbox, 12V VR6 airbox, and stock airbox. Additionally, you can use any aftermarket intake designed for a VR6 car. Using the stock airbox will require significant Dremeling to the MAF opening to enlarge it a ¼”, and I imagine you will have to re-drill holes for the mounting screws. The VR6 airbox is nice in that it’s easier to locate used, the lightest weight of the bunch, has the fewest airflow obstructions, and usually your cheapest option. However, if you can find one, the ideal choice is the stock airbox out of the TT225, for the simple reason that it drops straight in and works. You will notice on the VR airbox that the inlet for the SAI hose is located on the far corner of the air box, and while the hose can be re-routed and stretched, it’s a tricky fit. Also absent on the VR airbox is the air horn that helps to laminate air flow going into the MAF. The TT225 airbox has all of these parts right, and has a nice finished cover veneer to help insulate and pretty up your engine bay.

      42) Also note that the same size air filter is used in all three housings, so if you have a nice K&N or ITG drop-in from your stock airbox, simply move it over to the new one. Similarly, any airbox top will fit any airbox bottom, which led me to go with the combination of a VR6 12V bottom, and a TT225 top, netting the best qualities of both boxes.

      **Shameless plug: while your airbox is out is the perfect time to upgrade those shift cable bushings if you haven’t already. While the price of 42DD bushings keeps going up, Speed Source has a beautiful solid brass application for our cars that works great, all for $28 shipped. I just installed mine and they work AMAZING.

      http://www.speed-source.net/ **

      43) While there are several possible ways to attach the new larger MAF housing to your stock or aftermarket turbo inlet hose, here is an effective way I figured out that is also very easy. Clean up the TIH and a 3” silicon coupler with some soap and water and dry well. Install the coupler nearly as far as it will go onto the TIH. Next, install the new airbox into position, and slide the coupler off the TIH as needed so that it mates up squarely with the MAF. Tighten two large hose clamps here on both ends of the coupler to secure it. Reattach the SAI hose, MAF sensor plug, and reinstall the two allen head or hex bolts securing the airbox to the car.

      44) Tada!! You have now finished all the hardware changes needed to support running E85!





      Last edited by 4ceFed4; 01-01-2011 at 03:29 PM. Reason: Updated image URLs

    4. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      02-28-2010 11:38 AM #4
      STEP 4: Software Tuning

      Lemmiwinks: http://www.ecodetuning.com/revo/Lemmiwinks.exe

      UNI-settings: http://www.unitronic.ca/UNISetting.php

      You have two excellent choices for adjusting your fuel trims, timing, and other parameters to adjust for E85, but my preference is UNI-settings for two reasons. First, UNI-settings works with “dumb” USB to OBD2 cables WITHOUT pulling fuse #11, and second, UNI allows you to save settings profiles, which makes it easy to switch back and forth from E85 to 93/91.

      45) So assuming that you either need to drive to the gas station to fill up with E85, or would like to ability to run on normal pump gas, I am first going to detail the changes needed to run on 93 or 91 octane gas. While I haven’t yet run VAG-COM logs except to check for knock, you are amazingly able to make your car run the same as before you completed the 3 steps above by making some simple changes.

      Idle: I recommend bumping this up 90-100 RPM, especially if you have poly motor mounts. The engine will idle like you have a mild cam installed otherwise.

      Fueling on decreasing load: dropping this 10-15% will reduce the “throttle hang” that occurs when using the VR6 MAF housing.

      Fuel enrichment on startup and warmup: these two definitely take some tinkering, but try starting off with a 20-25% decrease and see how the car feels. My car ran a little rough for the first 60 seconds then adapted fine to the new setup.

      Ignition timing: because the VR MAF adds the equivalent of 4-5 degrees of timing advance over stock, you’ll want to compensate by running -3.0 of timing retard. If you only have 91 octane fuel available by you, change the setting to -4.5.

      Primary fuel enrichment: you will want to decrease this value the maximum amount possible, which is a little less than -25%. Between this change and the ECU’s ability to adapt, you will be able to correct for the larger 630cc injectors, but just barely.

      46) With these changes made, select “Write to ECU,” and cycle the ECU by turning the ignition off and then back on to save the changes. You can save this profile locally to your computer so that you can easily revert once you make changes for E85 by clicking “Save to disk.” Go into VAG-COM, module 01, Fault Codes, and select clear all codes to reset the ECU. Now is also a good time to do a throttle body adaptation by selecting 08-Measuring Blocks, entering group 060, switching to Basic Settings, and waiting 30 seconds before closing.

      47) At this point you are good to start your car. Don’t forget to check for fuel leaks. Drive the car around and see how it feels, and run some VAG-COM logs (which I’ll be getting into during a later post) and see how the fuel trims are adapting.

      48) When you’re ready for your first fill up with E85, you’ll want to make a new settings profile following the above as rough guidelines. Basically you want to reset the primary fuel trim back to zero, increase timing, and tinker with the warmup and startup values until the car feels right. You can lower the idle a little bit if you like, but continue playing with the decelerating load fueling until throttle hang is minimal. The settings above are a baseline and I will continually post updates as I experiment and log, but on my car at least this configuration makes the E85 feel pretty darn nice.

      49) *Updated 3/10/10*
      The above screen shot shows the latest settings I've been using with E85. You'll notice that I trimmed 5% off the primary fuel tweak, in an effort to get the running value in measuring block 032 within the +/- 10% guideline. Current readings are -0.4% and -4.5%. The fuel enrichment at startup value is also crucial to avoid storing multiple cylinder misfire DTCs from rough starts. It seems as though adding an extra 5% helps out quite a bit. A 3% increase avoided codes but was a little rough, and 0% was pretty rough for that first 60 seconds of "start up." I might try adding a few more % and seeing if things get better or worse. The warm up value doesn't seem as critical, but I added some extra fuel in there and the car seems to have responded well. My idle is still a little bit shakier than stock, but not bad by any means. Once I get everything else set where I like it, I will go after this last. I'm still not exactly sure what the idle additive torque does, but changing it back to 0 from +2 (in combination with the installation of hard boost pipes) gave me an extra couple mmHG of vacuum at idle.


      ***Well that is pretty much it. Check back as I update the software tuning part of the conversion, and please share your findings as well so that we can collectively iron out all the wrinkles. I am very happy that I did this conversion, and would recommend it to anyone who has convenient access to E85 fueling stations. The low and mid range power gains are VERY noticeable, as is the complete lack of top end as a result of maxxing out the stock turbo. I hope this guide helps the community, and good luck!

      Modified by 4ceFed4 at 5:53 PM 3-4-2010

      Last edited by 4ceFed4; 01-01-2011 at 03:35 PM. Reason: Updated image URLs

    5. Banned 20aeman's Avatar
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      02-28-2010 12:04 PM #5
      very nice.

      I think I'm going to have to go back to the corn juice. Just need to find some 870 injectors.

      wanna sell me that vr airbox?


      Modified by 20aeman at 9:12 AM 2-28-2010


    6. Member Nightrider's Avatar
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      02-28-2010 12:36 PM #6
      This is an EXCELLENT write-up!

    7. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      02-28-2010 01:13 PM #7
      Quote, originally posted by Nightrider »
      This is an EXCELLENT write-up!

      Thanks, I appreciate the feedback


    8. Member saps's Avatar
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      02-28-2010 02:18 PM #8
      amazing job on the writeup, i will definitely be using this as a guide when i do my conversion .

    9. Member ejg3855's Avatar
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      02-28-2010 03:03 PM #9
      Should be in the FAQ awesome work.
      HAVE - 180Q F23 | 1989 MK2 VR6 | 2004 F250 PowerStroke | 1991 GTI Haldex |


      HAD - 225TT - 600hp | 225TT - Donor | MK4 20v | Mk4 2.slow | 91 V8 | 2x - CQ | 88 GTI |

    10. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      02-28-2010 06:35 PM #10
      Thanks

    11. Member saps's Avatar
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      03-03-2010 06:24 PM #11
      a couple things:
      1. bump
      2. FAQ material

    12. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      03-03-2010 06:39 PM #12
      Quote, originally posted by saps »
      a couple things:
      1. bump
      2. FAQ material

      Thanks! Looks like it got added to the FAQ

      I started looking at some fuel logs today from my initial set up. At idle my car is at 0% adaptation, and -17.1% running. Idle has lost a little of its smoothness. With a requested idle of 820 RPM, it bounces around between 800-820. The engine load at idle is 13.7%, which is a little below the 15% minimum of the range. Everything else looks good. If anyone has any suggestions where to go from here, I'd love to hear. Otherwise I'm going to start experimenting and see what happens


    13. Member ejg3855's Avatar
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      03-03-2010 06:43 PM #13
      Log timing and tweak ?

      HAVE - 180Q F23 | 1989 MK2 VR6 | 2004 F250 PowerStroke | 1991 GTI Haldex |


      HAD - 225TT - 600hp | 225TT - Donor | MK4 20v | Mk4 2.slow | 91 V8 | 2x - CQ | 88 GTI |

    14. Member ejg3855's Avatar
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      03-03-2010 06:47 PM #14
      Quote, originally posted by 4ceFed4 »
      STEP 4: Software Tuning


      48) When you’re ready for your first fill up with E85, you’ll want to make a new settings profile following the above as rough guidelines. Basically you leave the primary fuel trim alone, increase timing, and tinker with the warmup and startup values until the car feels right. You can lower the idle a little bit if you like, but continue playing with the decelerating load fueling until throttle hang is minimal. The settings above are a baseline and I will continually post updates as I experiment and log, but on my car at least this configuration makes the E85 feel pretty darn nice.


      When you say leave the primary alone you mean to set it back to 0% instead of the -25% correct?

      HAVE - 180Q F23 | 1989 MK2 VR6 | 2004 F250 PowerStroke | 1991 GTI Haldex |


      HAD - 225TT - 600hp | 225TT - Donor | MK4 20v | Mk4 2.slow | 91 V8 | 2x - CQ | 88 GTI |

    15. 03-03-2010 06:55 PM #15
      And the point of this is????

    16. 03-03-2010 06:58 PM #16
      Quote, originally posted by DH Photography »
      And the point of this is????

      To run E85 and enjoy its benefits.

      Nice write up. I've run E85 by simply filling my tank with it with larger injectors to match up the AFRs then added timing. It's a bit easier but this looks more professional.


    17. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      03-03-2010 07:02 PM #17
      Quote, originally posted by ejg3855 »
      Log timing and tweak ?

      I'm really not looking to max out timing, but I can tell you that with a VR6 MAF (+4-5 degrees) and +7.5 degrees added in UNI-settings, I had 0 timing pull when logging the 4 cylinders for several 2nd and 3rd gear runs. The torque from these settings, especially part throttle in 2nd and 3rd gear, is almost scary. Mind you I put down 291 ft-lbs to the wheels running 93 and xylene, so I'm not a torque noob. The car feels like it's well into the 3s, and I'm not allowed to replace rods in my SCCA class, so I'll probably be backing things off a bit for the long run.


    18. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      03-03-2010 07:06 PM #18
      Quote, originally posted by ejg3855 »

      When you say leave the primary alone you mean to set it back to 0% instead of the -25% correct?

      That's correct. I may adjust the primary down a little bit if I can't get the correction shown in Block 032 down by adjusting some other things.


    19. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      03-03-2010 07:08 PM #19
      Quote, originally posted by DH Photography »
      And the point of this is????

      Just as Engineerd said. Why wouldn't you want to allow your car to run a cheaper fuel that also produces significant power gains??


    20. Member Issam Abed's Avatar
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      03-03-2010 07:10 PM #20
      Excellent write up.
      1 suggestion. Send an email to VMG and ask them to hose the text and images so that the links wont be broken in months to come as this thread gets passed around the internet.

    21. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 09:22 AM #21
      Quote, originally posted by Issam Abed »
      Excellent write up.
      1 suggestion. Send an email to VMG and ask them to hose the text and images so that the links wont be broken in months to come as this thread gets passed around the internet.

      Thanks for the advice. I just email info@vwvortex.com, I'll see what they say. I have the images hosted on private ISP web space, so they should be pretty reliable for the long term, and I have no plans on deleting them.


    22. Member bjtgtr's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 09:45 AM #22
      Great write up very well thought out and informative.

    23. Member elRey's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 11:14 AM #23
      Power gains from advaning timing and/or up'ing boost - yes
      cheaper gas - no


      You use ~30% more. So, it need to be ~30% less to break even. Not to mention you have to fill up more often.

      Don't get wrong. I run E85 daily.


    24. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 12:11 PM #24
      Quote, originally posted by elRey »
      Power gains from advaning timing and/or up'ing boost - yes
      cheaper gas - no


      You use ~30% more. So, it need to be ~30% less to break even. Not to mention you have to fill up more often.

      Don't get wrong. I run E85 daily.

      Not sure about gas and E85 prices across the country, but here's what I have observed locally on Long Island, NY. There are currently several stations offering E85 at $2.27 a gallon. A gallon of 93 runs around $3.09-3.17, depending where you go. So looking at MPGs, is it cheaper than 93? No, it is just barely more expensive. My cheaper comment was meant as a comparison to race fuel, which in all honesty E85 is more similar to. With E85, you get all the benefits of race fuel, at about the price of 93, and a fraction of the cost of actual race fuel.


    25. Member IDP FTW's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 01:57 PM #25
      bookmarked. Great write-up


    26. Member joe'sGTI's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 02:09 PM #26
      <3 u
      ☭ Communist Dubs ☭

    27. Member schwartzmagic's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 02:30 PM #27
      Why can't every DIY be this good?

    28. Member dtcaward's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 03:00 PM #28
      Quote, originally posted by schwartzmagic »
      Why can't every DIY be this good?

      i know right, great wight up, two


    29. 03-04-2010 04:05 PM #29
      Quote, originally posted by elRey »
      Power gains from advaning timing and/or up'ing boost - yes
      cheaper gas - no


      You use ~30% more. So, it need to be ~30% less to break even. Not to mention you have to fill up more often.

      Don't get wrong. I run E85 daily.

      Yep. One one E85 station around and its an hour away.


    30. Member bzflag's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 04:28 PM #30
      Quote, originally posted by 4ceFed4 »

      I started looking at some fuel logs today from my initial set up. At idle my car is at 0% adaptation, and -17.1% running

      FWIW that's almost exactly what mine are as well.

      Setup:
      Ko3s, 3" MAF, 630s on stock fuel pump , APR 93 and 100 files.


    31. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 05:31 PM #31
      Thanks for all the kind words everyone

      I'm going to do a TDI 5th gear swap DIY in the coming weeks, keep an eye out.

      Quote, originally posted by bzflag »

      FWIW that's almost exactly what mine are as well.

      Setup:
      Ko3s, 3" MAF, 630s on stock fuel pump , APR 93 and 100 files.

      That's good to know. I think I'm still going to fudge with things and try to get the running adaptation inside of +/- 10%.


    32. Member bzflag's Avatar
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      03-04-2010 05:54 PM #32
      Quote, originally posted by 4ceFed4 »

      That's good to know. I think I'm still going to fudge with things and try to get the running adaptation inside of +/- 10%.

      I just pulled the ~16% out of my primary...


    33. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      03-05-2010 02:47 PM #33
      Quote, originally posted by bzflag »

      I just pulled the ~16% out of my primary...

      Yea, that's what I meant I am going to try to do.


    34. Member 4ceFed4's Avatar
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      03-08-2010 09:45 AM #34
      I played with a few more start up and warm up related settings over the weekend. Changing the start up and warm up values back to the default 100% caused the car to misfire a lot in that first 60 seconds after you start her up in the morning, so it definitely seems that increasing fueling during these stages is the way to go. On a positive note, a further decrease in the decel load down to 85% further improved the throttle hang issue, I may try another 5% off here and see where it takes me. Still playing around with primary and secondary tweaks, I will update the E86 settings jpg in "Step 4" above once I come up with settings I am completely happy with, until then what I have posted up there is a good start.

    35. Member bzflag's Avatar
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      03-09-2010 12:03 PM #35
      IM sent

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