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    VWVortex


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    Thread: Want to replace synchros (synchronizers) in my Syncro. Need a little input.

    1. Member CrazyMonkey's Avatar
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      04-03-2010 11:21 PM #26
      Alrighty then. I made some progress this week. Wednesday night I got the output shaft reassembled. Pictures:
      Here's the 2nd gear synchro and 2nd gear slid back onto the shaft. The hub for 1st and 2nd stayed in place when I pulled everything off.


      Since I don't have a shop press and all the inner race tools, I decided to take advantage of physics.... I heated up the inner race for the 3rd gear needle bearings and it slid right on. Thermal expansion FTW!


      I did the same with all the other press fit parts, and the shaft was all back together!


      __________________________________________________ __________________

      So... onto today. I cleaned up all the gunk off the magnet in the bottom of the case. No pictures of that. I also finally got the throwout bearing sleeve out of the bellhousing portion of the trans case (gotta get that out to replace the input shaft seal).
      Whoever last removed the three bolts that hold the sleeve in place chewed up the heads pretty good (small triple squares [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthdown.gif[/IMG]). I couldn't get my tool to bite, so it was starting to strip the heads of the bolts out even more. I tried some sockets that are designed for removing bolts with rounded-off heads, but that didn't work. I was about ready to drill into them and use easy outs, but I had another thought. I found that a 7/16" 12-point socket just BARELY didn't fit over the outside of the head of the bolts, so I got out the hammer and tapped the socket into place. The socket stretched just enough and dug into the bolt head just enough that I was able to break them loose. Of course, I had to tap the bolts back out of the socket but hey, it worked. Sorry, no pictures of that either.
      Now for some pictures. I got the ring gear bolt kit (a.k.a. differential bolt kit) installed today! Step one, protect bearings and spider gears (I used tape). Step two, start drilling!


      I started with a 1/8" bit and then progressively worked up to 1/2". I discovered after the first one, that you really didn't need a pilot hole since the ends of the rivets had nice dimples in them, I could just go at them with the 1/2" drill bit. You drill in about 7mm and if the end of the rivet doesn't just pop off and stick to the bit by then, then it's a simple matter of tapping the heads off with a small chisel and ball peen hammer. Here's the 1/2" bit:


      After drilling the heads off, you beat them out with a drift and a hammer. I ended up using a 6-lb sledgehammer. You probably don't really need to use one of those, but it made pretty quick work of getting the rivets out. Here they all are:


      Close-up.


      Here's the diff and ring gear with all the rivets out. Now time to clean it up really good so no metal shavings get into anything vital.


      Here's the cleaned up unit with the bolts pressed in. The bolt doesn't have a hex head or anything. It's a shouldered bolt with serrations that gets pressed into the differential housing. I didn't get a picture of that, but I'll get one that shows the round heads when I reassemble the tranny. Anyway, I tried using a small little shop press that I borrowed and it didn't work out so hot, so I ended up gently tapping the bolts in with a hammer.


      Finally, here are the nuts installed on the bolts. That gray goop is the assembly lube that comes with the ARP bolt kit.

      And now it's time to start reassembling the transmission. Woohoo!!!
      Eschew obfuscation!

      Isaiah 26:4
      Ephesians 2:8-10
      Hebrews 3:12-14

    2. Member CrazyMonkey's Avatar
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      04-12-2010 01:43 AM #27
      Got the tranny 97.3% back together tonight. Still have to adjust 5th gear, then I can bolt the cover back on. Then after that it's press the input shaft seal into the throwout bearing sleeve, then bolt on the sleeve, then slide on the throwout bearing and I'm done with the tranny! Woot!
      Pictures coming tomorrow... maybe....
      Eschew obfuscation!

      Isaiah 26:4
      Ephesians 2:8-10
      Hebrews 3:12-14

    3. Member CrazyMonkey's Avatar
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      04-12-2010 11:59 PM #28
      Okay, picture time.

      Half of the transmission case. I cleaned up all the mating surfaces real good so I could put sealant goop on it and have a nice clean surface for goop to stick to.


      The other half of the case. I also cleaned up the mating surfaces on this half. Here the differential is set back in place.


      Close-up of the differential. The bolts in the bolt kit pressed through from this side. The nuts are on the side you can't see.


      Gears and shafts back in. Output (pinion) shaft on the left, input (main) shaft on the right.


      Custom alignment tool I made. The manual says to use a M8x100 stud (8mm diameter, 100mm long) for aligning the next part, but I couldn't find one in town anywhere. So I found a M8x100 bolt at Coastal Farm and ground the head into almost a point. I purposefully left it kinda rough anticipating the need to grip and twist with greasy/oily fingers.


      Reverse idler shaft installed. Here I'm installing the alignment tool. The part I'm holding onto holds the bearing for the reverse idler shaft. The alignment tool keeps it from wiggling around while I stick the other half of the case on. Then I can put in the two bolts that hold it in place in the other half of the case.


      The other half of the case bolted on. I didn't get a picture of the shift forks sitting in place, but there's a picture of how that would look (kinda) on that Eurovan tranny picture I posted earlier.... My finger is on that alignment tool.


      Here's another shot of the alignment tool (red arrow). To the left, upper side of the picture, there's a bolt down on the outside of the transmission that is one of the two bolts that holds that reverse idler bearing support in place. Once that bolt is in, the alignment tool comes out and the other bolt for the bearing support goes in its place.


      And an excerpt from Mr. Bentley... you can see the reverse idler shaft support and the two bolts.


      5th gear set reinstalled.


      So, pretty much all back together. I need to adjust the spacing between the shift collar and 5th gear, then I can get the case end cover back on, and the input shaft seal/throwout bearing sleeve reinstalled and the tranny is back together!


      Modified by CrazyMonkey at 9:00 PM 4-12-2010


      Modified by CrazyMonkey at 9:05 PM 4-12-2010
      Eschew obfuscation!

      Isaiah 26:4
      Ephesians 2:8-10
      Hebrews 3:12-14

    4. Member CrazyMonkey's Avatar
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      '92 Passat G60 Syncro, '00 Suburban, '08 Nissan Maxima
      04-16-2010 01:40 AM #29
      The transmission is done and ready to be mated to the engine. I still have to do a few things to the engine (bolt on exhaust manifold, change rear main seal, change timing belt, install distributor), but after that, I can bolt the two back together, bolt on the right-angle drive, then drop it all back in! Woohoo!
      Pictures... my wife helped with the pictures I appear in.
      Using feeler gauges to adjust 5th gear.


      End cover bolted back on. Driver's side front axle drive flange set in place ready to be installed into the differential.


      My extra special installation tool... a chunk of pressure-treated 4x4.


      Tapping the drive flange back into the differential.


      Drive flange installed.


      Here I'm using the old input shaft seal as a tool to drive the new one in. You can press it in part of the way with your fingers, but then you need to tap it the rest of the way in with a hammer. Using the old seal makes sure the hammer blows are on the very outer edges of the new seal and doesn't damage it... and also means you don't need to buy the special installation tool.


      Input shaft seal installed into the throwout bearing (a.k.a. clutch release bearing) sleeve.


      A little multi-purpose grease on the seal.


      Sliding the sleeve over the end of the input shaft.


      Throwout bearing sleeve ready to be bolted down.


      Torquing to spec.


      Done with the throwout bearing sleeve.... now it's time to install the throwout bearing.


      Here's the nasty clutch release lever and bearing... I'm gonna clean that up and use a new bearing.


      Clutch release lever cleaned up and new bearing ready to go.


      Throwout bearing installed, and I'm done with the transmission. Now I have to do a few things to the engine and mate the two back up and get them back in the car.


      Transmission cleaned up a bit and ready to be mated to the engine.


      I feel like I accomplished something! Hopefully these pictures help someone out in the future...
      Eschew obfuscation!

      Isaiah 26:4
      Ephesians 2:8-10
      Hebrews 3:12-14

    5. 07-05-2012 06:12 PM #30
      i really wish these pics worked

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