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    Thread: REFERENCE: 1.8t Fuel Lines/ Fueling FAQ

    1. Moderator groggory's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 21st, 2003
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      2002 VW GTI 1.8 BT
      07-09-2010 03:38 AM #1
      1.8t Fueling FAQ

      Note: I have some terminology that references brake systems. Brake systems are similar to fuel systems in that 1) they are critical and not allowed to fail for safety reasons and 2) they are high pressure lines filled with material that must be treated special (compared to water or similar). As such, brake line methodologies can be carried across to fuel line methodologies very nicely.

      In case any of the image links ever decide to break, I've put this in a PDF for all future posterity (updated October 20, 2010)

      Terminology
      • AN vs. NPT: Understanding port threads, adapter fittings and line sizes.
        What is AN?
        The designation AN stands for Army/Navy and calls out mil/spec (military specifications) for dimensional standards of hydraulic lines, hose-end connectors and port adapter fittings. AN specifications are a popular standard met by all companies that manufacture AN style performance fuel hose and accessories. For many there has been much confusion about the subject of AN lines, NPT and ORB ports, and how all of this works together. Here are the answers for those wanting to know.

        Flare Angles
        The flare angle used to seal AN connections is required to be SAE, 37 degree, as apposed to the 45 degree flare commonly found on household plumbing adapters. This angle can be found on the male point of the port adapter fitting and on the female inside the hose-end nut. AN port threads are not NPT or “pipe thread” but instead utilize straight threads (like any normal fastener) and SAE O-Ring Boss (ORB) technology for sealing. AN lines, ORB ports and the appropriate port adapter fittings are measured in inch/fractional sizes.

        AN 'dash' sizing
        A dash (–) size in AN “speak” refers to the I.D. of a standard, thin wall, hard line as the basis to construct a comparable flexible hose that may be used in it’s place. A 1/2”, thin wall, hard line measures .500” on the outside diameter (O.D.), has an inside diameter (I.D.) of 0.440”, and a wall thickness of 0.030”. An appropriate, flexible replacement line would be –8 AN, with a minimum 0.440” I.D. Depending on line construction, rubber with stainless steel or nylon braid, or Teflon with stainless steel braid, the line’s wall thickness and O.D. may vary.

        AN line sizes will have a dash (-) preceding the line size. The number after the dash refers to the number of 1/16 of an inch O.D., thin wall, hard line to which the flexible line will compare. For example, calling for a –8 AN line would mean the engineer or system designer requires a flexible line, made of certain materials suitable for the application, that would have the minimum I.D. of an 8/16” (1/2”) O.D. hard line. The actual line construction is dictated by the application with regard to line flexibility, vacuum and pressure capability, abrasion resistance and chemical compatibility, etc. Regardless, the engineer knows a -8 line of any construction will have a minimum I.D. equal to 1/2” hard line (.0440”), and be able to support similar flow rates.

        Modern, Best Practices
        Modern, high performance fuel systems are predominately fitted with safer, better sealing, higher flowing, AN-ORB ports. These ports require a straight thread adapter fitting, with a sealing O-Ring installed over the threads, up to the hex, that disappears into the port when properly installed. No additional thread sealer is required or recommended.

        NPT, AN, and adapters
        National Pipe Thread (NPT) ports, AN Ports and port adapter fittings:
        Over the years, in low-pressure hydraulics, NPT has been a popular thread for ports and adapter fittings. When NPT ports are used in a fuel system with AN line, an adapter fitting to convert from NPT to AN is required. NPT was designed for use with thick walled pipe, typically black pipe, used in fixed structures like buildings, to handle distribution of water and natural gas. Black pipe isn’t particularly bendable, flexible or lightweight and hardly desirable for plumbing a high performance fuel system. As a result fittings that adapt NPT ports to AN line are common to allow flexible AN lines to be utilized in performance automotive fuel systems.

        Unlike AN thread, which is straight, NPT ports and fittings are both tapered. NPT male to female adapters start loose, threading easily but get tight and harder to turn well before the hex touches the port. When threaded together, the NPT design creates a wedging effect, binding the thread in order to seal. The use of a thread sealant is common and required with NPT, as it does not consistently create a positive seal on it’s own, like an O-Ring configuration. It’s common to see a number of threads showing on the adapter fitting when NPT is sufficiently tight, making NPT assemblies bulkier and less clean appearing than a similar AN assembly.

        NPT ports are commonly adapted to AN lines, but the NPT size designation is confusing, identifying the pipe I.D. rather than the O.D. Black pipe has a much thicker wall than hard line, so the pipe/port O.D. is much larger than the NPT size would seem to indicate. For example, a 3/8” NPT port will have an outside diameter of 5/8”, allowing for a wall thickness of 1/8” (0.125”). As a result, NPT port sizes allow use of a one step larger AN line than their indicated size would seem to support. As long as the wall of the adapter fitting is not overly thick, the following NPT Port to AN adapters will provide a common I.D. through-hole:

        JIC

        JIC fittings, defined by the SAE J514 and MIL-F-18866 standards, are a type of flare fitting machined with a 37-degree flare seating surface. JIC (Joint Industry Council) fittings are widely used in fuel delivery and fluid power applications, especially where extremely high pressure is involved. The SAE J514 standard replaces the MS16142 military specification, although some tooling is still listed under MS16142. JIC fittings are dimensionally identical to AN (Army-Navy) fittings, but are produced to less exacting tolerances and are generally less costly. 45-degree flare fittings are similar in appearance, but are not interchangeable.

        JIC fitting systems have three components that make a tubing assembly: fitting, flare nut, and sleeve. As with other flared connection systems, the seal is achieved through metal-to-metal contact between the finished surface of the fitting nose and the inside diameter of the flared tubing. The sleeve is used to evenly distribute the compressive forces of the flare nut to the flared end of the tube. Materials commonly used to fabricate JIC fittings include forged carbon steel, forged stainless steel, forged brass, machined brass, Monel and nickel-copper alloys.

        AN -> NPT port sizing
        Maximum AN line for NPT port size:
        1/4” NPT is compatible with up to -6 AN (3/8” hard line)
        3/8” NPT is compatible with up to –8 AN (1/2” hard line)
        1/2” NPT is compatible with up to –10 AN (5/8” hard line)
        3/4” NPT is compatible with up to -16 AN (1” hard line)

        Connecting large AN fittings to smaller NPT fittings WARNINGS
        Adapter fittings are available for connecting larger than recommended AN lines to the above NPT ports. Beware, the inside diameter of the adapter fitting will necessarily be smaller on the NPT side, creating a flow restriction that many racers and hotrod enthusiasts overlook. This is a poor practice and should be avoided, but when no alternative is available, consider sourcing a steel NPT to AN adapter from a good hydraulic supplier. Steel adapters will have a thinner wall than aluminum, due to the increase in material strength, leaving a larger I.D. to support higher flow on the too small, NPT side of the adapter.
      • SAE J514, Straight Thread O-Ring Boss (ORB)

        This straight thread connection uses the same threads as the JIC 37°. However the 37° flare has been removed and an o-ring has been added. When mated with a female o-ring boss port the o-ring is trapped in a special tapered counter bore to affect the seal.
        See here for more information
      • Common army/navy (AN) line and thread specifications
        AN | Metal Tube (Hard Line) OD | Port & Fitting (Diameter-TPI)

        2 | 1/8" | 5/16-24 SAE
        3 | 3/16" | 3/8-24 SAE
        4 | 1/4" | 7/16-20 SAE
        5 | 5/16" | 1/2-20 SAE
        6 | 3/8" | 9/16-18 SAE
        8 | 1/2" | 3/4-16 SAE
        10 | 5/8" | 7/8-14 SAE
        12 | 3/4" | 1-1/16-12 SAE
        16 | 1" | 1-5/16-12 SAE
        20 1-1/4" | 1-5/8-12 SAE
        24 | 1-1/2" | 1-7/8-12 SAE
        28 | 1-3/4" | 2-1/4-12 SAE
        32 | 2" | 2-1/2-12 SAE
      • A note about AN Flares versus SAE Flares:
        Automotive flares and flare tools are 45-degree flares. “AN” flares are 37 degrees. It is not “technically correct” to use a 45-degree flared tube with the 37 degree AN fittings, and for military and aviation use, this is not allowed: The 37-degree flares are designed to operate safely in systems up through 3,000 psi, so a flared angle mismatch is not allowed under these conditions. We never see such pressures in auto fuel systems. In actual testing that I have done, I have found that the 45/37 combination works safely and reliably in pressure systems up to 250 psi. In applications above 250 psi, the line-interface created by the angle mismatch can start to leak if the fittings are not re-torqued. In automotive fuel systems operating at 4 to 8 psi, the 45/37 interface works reliably and flawlessly, without the need to re-torque. Much more reliably than a rubber fuel line with a clamp… However, if you want to create a “perfect” flare interface, 37-degree flare tools are available from aviation supply houses.

        You will not notice any difference in system reliability between the two flare angles in this automotive fuel system application.

        Example of AN Flare
      • Where are the different flares used on our cars?

        There are four (more or less) flaring styles in common use for brake systems. British cars have a bubble flare (aka Girling flare) backed up with a male swivel nut or a 45 degree double flare backed up with a female swivel nut. Metric cars have ISO bubble flares, where the pipes and threads are metric sizes rather than inch. Detroit iron has a 45 degree double flare backed up by a male threaded nut. Most (non-British) race cars are plumbed with AN (aka JIC) type single flares - a 37 degree single flare with a backup sleeve and inch threaded swivel nut (some people make a double flare here, which is useless overkill and may lead to failure; see below). Lastly, some brake fittings use tapered pipe fittings.

        Take the easy one first: tapered pipe fittings are not really a positive seal under adverse conditions. They may do the job for a street car, but they certainly have no place on a race car.

        The bubble flare is used with a male swivel nut, and seals at the bottom of a drilled and tapped hole, with a nice angled bottom. While it can usually be resealed, it has a limited lifetime - there's no good way to get back the deformation that was crushed out for the first seal, short of remaking the flare from scratch.

        Making such a flare is easy: if you are in possession of a standard 45 degree double flaring tool, the bubble flare is what results after the first half of the operation. Simply stop there, and you have the bubble flare which will seat nicely at the bottom of the hole. If you continue, inverting the form tool and finishing the job, you then have the more familiar double flare used by Girling and the US automotive industry.

        The SAE 45 degree double flare usually has a male-threaded tube nut that bears directly on the OD of the flared tube- so you need a double flare to help control galling that can result in stress cracking right at the flare. In short, you need "give" there. Problem is, the deformation that results is kind of irreversible, so the next cycle or two will result in your having to use astronomical torques to keep the flare from weeping. Worse is trying to use a single flare in an SAE flare nut and seat, and worse still if the seat is brass- the flared tube is sqaushed from both sides, even as it is deformed by the nut galling on it. The brass seat deforms and work hardens. It may seal once, with a ton of torque and some luck. It's not recommended practice - it's not even a good idea.

        Racers (and aircraft, which is where the system originated as the "Army-Navy" or AN standard in WWII) use the single 37 degree flare. The AN single flare is still a concave flare, but its 37deg angle seals by stretching, not squashing. The tube is supported by a separate sleeve that the female-threaded tube nut bears upon. This isolates the flare from the torques imparted by the nut. So rather than trying to get a seal despite the presence of rotating torques and the resulting galling, you press the flare between precisely-machined (steel!) seat and precisely-machined support sleeve. The sealing area under compression is at least double that of the SAE flare. An additional bonus is that the OD of the nut is a lot larger than the 3/8" of an SAE nut, which means you won't kill as many trying to get the proper sealing torque. (Even so, you should always use a proper flare nut wrench on any tube nut.)

        The SAE stuff was designed to go together once on the assembly line, and then be "immortal", as defined by Detroit. It's pretty good at it, too! The AN stuff is designed for field serviceability, long fatigue life, and a level of bulletproofness the SAE never considered. A further, Very Strong, recommendation is that single flared AN fittings are the only thing that Carroll Smith will suffer to put on his race cars.

        The reason for harping on repeatability and multiple mate-demate cycles is that, to the best of my knowledge, I have never once put something on the car, and had it stay put on. I always forgot something, or broke something during the season, or needed to swap out something because it was at the end of its service life. While the double flare has that nice "squish" feeling as you tighten the flare nut the first time, the AN fitting has the same torque requirement for the second mating cycle as the first. That's where the reliablity across multiple cycles comes from.

        Never use compression fittings for brake plumbing.

        I know racers that have gone so far as to purge all the SAE double flare fittings out of the plumbing of their track cars, except possibly the fittings at the master cylinder. The rationale is two-fold: first, the above-mentioned repeatability, and second, the fact that the AN parts are universally available at every race shop in every backwater in the country.

        I have not gone quite so far on my British cars, which are plumbed with Girling flares. It is a happy coincidence (at least, it seems like a coincidence, perhaps it is by design) that the female Girling flare hardware will mate comfortably with a male AN-3 fitting; I have thus replaced the fancy fittings on the rubber hoses with the appropriate AN-3 male-to-male bulkhead fittings, and the hoses themselves with -3 female fittings on Teflon -3 line. My master cylinders all have machined flat surfaces, so the outlets are easy to adapt to -3 hoses as well (-4 for the clutch, typically).

        A few words about Teflon lines: they may not have a place on your street car. For starters, the Teflon lines you make up at home don't have DOT approval, because they haven't been through the DOT approval process and you're not a certified manufacturer. Even the Teflon lines you can buy pre-built are probably not DOT approved (though there are a few coming onto the market) for the same certification reasons. The main reason for this lack of approval is that manufacturers of racing gear don't care to spend the money - they're building the hoses for racers. The next reason is that the DOT expected lifetime for such brake hoses is five years, and the prudent racer will replace his or her brake hoses every other season, just to be sure. (This is a good reason to make your own - then you can reuse the fittings and just buy new olives and hose.) There are some concerns about using Teflon line in cold environments, though Aircraft Spruce is willing to sell you lines custom made from Aeroquip Teflon hose and rate them to -40 degF, so I'm not so sure that's a concern. It may well be that the intended application for those lines is not subject to as much repeated deflection as the flex line snaking through your front suspension out to the caliper.
      • Other Sealing Methods
        Other sealing methods

        There is one other kind of sealing involved in braking systems, usually at caliper or cylinder entry and often when converting over from one kind of flaring system to another: a washer face at the top of a hole. This requires a crush washer of soft copper, aluminum, or in extreme cases, a Stat-O-Seal, which is a combination of O-ring and aluminum crush washer. To make this an effective seal, a precision machined surface is required around the drilling, exactly perpendicular to the axis of the threaded hole. If this is not there, you must use a bottom sealing fitting. Conversely, if the hole does not have a nicely formed drill point form at its bottom or the fitting will not reach the bottom, you must use a sealing washer (and, of course, provide the machined washer face for it to seal against).

        A neat trick I learned a while back is that copper crush washers can be reused - IF you anneal them. Place the washer in question on a brick and play your propane torch across it until it glows orange. Let it cool. It's now as soft as it was originally and will re-crush and seal perfectly.


      DIY Links
      Last edited by groggory; 08-27-2012 at 07:11 PM.

    2. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      2002 VW GTI 1.8 BT
      07-09-2010 03:38 AM #2
      Pricing Summary

      Fuel Line Price Summary ($/ft prices based off 10ft length), in increasing order
      Aluminum Tubing - $0.80/ft
      Stainless Tubing - $2.40/ft
      Summit Racing Twist Tite - $2.50/ft
      Aeroquip AQP Socketless - $3.60/ft
      Summit Racing Stainless Braided - $4.00/ft
      Aeroquip AQP Stainless Braided - $5.00/ft
      Aeroquip Startlite - $6.90/ft

      Fitting Price Summary
      Tube Sleeves + Tube Nuts - ~$7
      AN -> Twist-Tite - ~$3
      AN -> AN Hose - ~$7
      AN -> AQP Socketless
      Add a bend to any of those fittings - ~+$7
      AN -> AQP/ Startlite Crimp - ~$17
      Add a bend to any of these fittings - ~+$15
      AN -> Factory Fuel Line - ~$17 aluminum, ~$35 stainless
      Bundy Fittings - ~$10

      Fuel Line Choices
      • Aluminum Tubing
        Soft material. Can be bent by hand or with an inexpensive tube bender. Smaller than flex tube for the same inner diameter. Compatible with hard line fittings.

        Use this for return line only. Does not have the pressure handling capabilities to be used for high pressure intake line.


        Summit Racing SUM-G2516 - 5/16" Alum, 25ft - $20
      • Stainless Steel Tubing
        Similar to aluminum tubing but requires higher quality flaring and bending tools to work with it. It can be polished much nicer than aluminum can and can be found without a seam weld line like aluminum. Compatible with hard line fittings.

        Pretty much this is the bee's knees of tubing. If you have the patience, tools, and ...patience to work with this stuff you can upgrade most every piece of your car. It can handle super high pressures, can withstand most every type of fluid (gas, E85, brake, hydraulic, A/C, jet fuel, whatever) and looks AWESOME when all set up right. Times where you should use a flexible line instead should be mating to a moving part. For instance, going from hardline in the body to the engine, you should couple the two pieces with some flex hose.


        Summit Racing SUM-220256 / 5/16", 20ft / $48
      • Twist-Tite (Reinforced Rubber Hose)
        Think of this as an inexpensive version of the braided steel hose. It can withstand high pressures, is flexible, and is inexpensive. The rated pressures are only good if you get the matching fittings. And remember, not all rubber tubing is created equal! You have to get the stuff that is built to carry high pressure fuel! This can be used in twist-tite connectors only. A note on the flexibility. Although this hose can flex it is burly stuff! Figure on a generous bend radius when using this hose. Although it is rubber, it is thick and doesn't like sharp bends. Those sharp bend situations are a place hard lines shine.

        Once you put this on the connector it cannot be just taken off.You will need to cut the tube off the connector, thus shortening the line length. This is good line, but when you connect it be 100% sure that it is where you want it because it's not coming off without you cutting it off.

        Furthermore, the connection this hose has on the connectors is substantial. No hose clamps are necessary to aid keeping the hose on the connector.

        Summit Racing Twist-Tite Hose - 6AN, 20ft - $45
      • Aeroquip AQP Socketless Hose (Reinforced rubber hose)
        This is similar to the twist-tie hose above but is compatible with the AQP socketless hose connectors. More expensive probably because it's a brand name. This can be used in AQP socketless hose connectors only. Per user Richard_Cranium, he considers this stuff a PITA. He purchased a bunch of this and was so frustrated with the assembly of it that he moved to braided stainless steel instead.

        Summit Racing FCV0615 / Aeroquip AQP Socketless hose 6AN, 15ft - $53
      • Aeroquip Startlite Racing Hose
        Similar to AQP socketless hose but it is sanctioned by many racing bodies and has a Nomex and kevlar cover for increased heat and abrasion resistance. Plus it's 45 percent lighter than similar hose from other brands. Handles similar pressure to the AQP socketless (200 PSI). Compatible with AQP fittings.

        Summit Racing FCU0610 / 6AN, 10ft - $69
      • Aeroquip AQP Stainless Steel Braided Hose
        This is similar to regular stainless braided hose, but it allows you to reuse your fittings if you'd like. Making a connection is as simple as pushing the AQP hose into the AQP fitting.

        NOT SURE --- I think this is cross compatible with generic stainless steel braided hose (aka Summit Racing house brand Stainless steel braided hose)

        Summit Racing FCA0610 - 6AN, 10ft - $50
      • Stainless Steel Flex Hose
        This is a generic product that is less expensive than the brand name Aeroquip or similar. Flexible, durable. Good stuff.

        Summit Racing SUM-230610 / 6AN, 10ft / $40


      Fittings
      Obviously, this list can't be comprehensive and my intention is not to make this comprehensive. This is just to give you a rough idea of what's out there to help you plan. If you're running a different hose size then go source something that fits your plan. Also, I'm listing prices so you can pick fittings that keep you in your budget. Some fittings cost far more than others. Also, there are many other companies than summit racing that make this stuff, they just have a nice website that allows me to link images off it.

      Also, I'm only going to post up one example of each fitting. You can get almost any of these fittings in straight (0 degree), 45 degree, 90 degree, and 180 degree variants.

      Color. The hot rod gods deemed blue and red to be the color of speed (I think)...so most every fitting seems to come in a combination of blue and red. In the last couple years companies started producing straight black fittings too. Of course, there is always the raw metal look (metal or nickel plated) So now'a'days you have some options

      • Here's what the angles look like...
      • 45 degrees
      • 90 degrees
      • 120 degrees
      • 150 degrees
      • 180 degrees

      • Aluminum Tubing -> AN Hose
        Summit Racing SUM-2200075 - 6AN hose -> 3/8" Alum tubing - $6
      • Hard Line -> AN Hose (Tube Sleeves)
        These work in conjunction with a tube nut. It goes like this...

        Put the tube nut on the hard line.
        Put the tube sleeve (smaller diameter side first) on the hard line.
        Prep, cut, and flare the hard line.
        Walla! You have a hard line with an AN female connection on it, ready to be mated to a male AN connection.

        Summit Racing FBM3679 / 5AN / $4
      • AN Tube Nuts
        The compliment to the tube sleeve

        Summit Racing FBM3591 / 3AN / $3
      • AN Crimp
        I don't know what this crimps on to? Stainless braided? Rubber? Aeroquip specific?

        Summit Racing FC3443-05S / 6AN hose end crimp / $2
      • Male AN -> Twist Tite

        Summit Racing SUM-220756 - 6AN male -> 6 AN barb - $3
      • Female AN -> Twist Tite

        Summit Racing SUM-220706 - $10
      • Female AN -> AN Hose

        Summit Racing SUM-220687 - $14
      • Male AN -> AN Hose
      • Female AN -> AN Hose
      • Female AN -> Aeroquip AQP

        Summit Racing FBM1012 / 6AN -> AQP / $7
      • Male AN -> Aeroquip AQP
      • Male AN -> Aeroquip AQP Socketless
      • Female AN -> Aeroquip AQP Socketless (Crimp)

        Summit Racing FBM4274 / 10AN -> 10AN / $31
      • Female AN -> Aeroquip AQP Socketless

        Summit Racing FBM1512 / AQP Socketless -> 6AN / $6
      • Male AN -> Male NPT

        Summit Racing FBM2037 / AN -> NPT / $10
      • Male AN -> Female NPT

        Summit Racing FBM2719 / 3AN -> 1/8" NPT / $10
      • Male AN Flare -> Metric

        Summit Racing FBM2608 / 6AN -> 16mmx1.5 / $14
      • Female AN -> Female AN

        Summit Racing FBM2916 / 8AN->8AN / $8
      • NPT Plug

        Summit Racing FBM3685 / 1/8" NPT / $4
      • AN -> Factory Tubing
        This will allow you to convert factory tubing to -AN. The stainless fitting costs about twice as much as the aluminum fitting. I don't know why most people would need the expensive stainless over the aluminum.

        Summit Racing 15117 / Stainless 6AN -> 5/16" OEM line / $35

        Summit Racing 640863 / Aluminum 6AN -> 5/16" OEM Line / $19
      • AN -> Factory Tubing (5/16" barb)


        Summit Racing 15103 / 6AN -> 5/16" OEM line / $35
        Jay Racing / $10
      • Male AN -> AN O-Ring

        Summit Racing 15607 / 8AN -> 8AN Oring / $13
      • Female 6AN -> Male 3/8" Barb Fittings


        USRT / $30
        Jay Racing / $10
      • Male M18x1.5 -> Male 6AN , Male M12x1.5 -> Male 6AN
        This fitting is pretty much perfect for the Bosch 044 pump.

        USRT / $25
      • Male M18x1.5 -> Male -6AN
        Perfect for Bosch 044 Inlet

        $10 / Jay Racing
      • Male M18x1.5 -> Male -8AN
        Perfect for Bosch 044 Inlet

        $10 / Jay Racing
      • Male M18x1.5 -> Male -10AN
        Perfect for Bosch 044 Inlet
      • Male 12x1.5 -> Male -6AN
        Perfect for Bosch 044 Outlet

        $10 / Jay Racing
      • Male M18x1.5 -> OEM Style Nipple , Male M12x1.5 -> OEM style nipple
        Perfect for adapting stock fuel line to the Bosch 044.
        Fittings are made of stainless and come with the proper copper crush washers.
        This is so that the Bosch 044 can be a drop in replacement for the stock OEM fuel filter.
        Note: If you put the Bosch 044 in this location you should make sure to add proper filtration into the system in a different location (both pre and post pump). See notes on fuel filters for more details.


        Badger-5.com / 50 pounds sterling + shipping ($81.68 US + ~$40 shipping to the US)
      • 10mmx1.0 -> 6AN
        This fitting is perfect for the Walbro fuel pump

        USRT / $20
      • O-Rings for AN-Oring connections
        ...list some compatible Viton and Buna-N o-rings
      • Bundy Fittings
        These are what your OEM fuel system uses all over the place. C2 Motorsports seems to carry them.


      Bulkhead Adapters
      • Use these when you need to get a line through a firewall, panel, or anything else for that matter. Much more secure than just drilling a hole and pulling lines through.
      • 6AN -> 6AN

        Summit Racing FBM2072 / 6AN ->6AN / $5
      • Bulkhead Nut

        Summit Racing FBM2103 / 8AN / $3


      Reducers
      • 8AN -> 6AN

        Summit Racing FBM2410 / 8AN -> 6AN / $8


      Splitters
      • 8AN -> 8AN -> 8AN

        Summit Racing FBM2283
      • 10AN -> 8AN -> 8AN

        Summit Racing 15620 / $78

        Summit Racing 15675 / $50


      Gauge Adapters
      • Flare -> Flare (w/ NPT Gauge Port)

        USRT / $9
      • AN -> NPT (w/ NPT Gauge Port)

        Summit Racing FBM2277, $7
      • AN -> AN (w/ NPT Gauge Port)

        Summit Racing FBM2183, AN6->AN6, $7


      Links
      Last edited by groggory; 08-23-2012 at 11:59 AM.

    3. Moderator groggory's Avatar
      Join Date
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      Location
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      2002 VW GTI 1.8 BT
      07-09-2010 03:38 AM #3
      Water/ Methanol (Water/ Meth) (W/M) Injection
      This is spraying a mix of water and methanol into your intake tract somewhere along the line. It's a topic unto itself and therefore I've created a separate thread for it here

      Check Valves
      • Aeromotive High Flow One Way Check Valves

        Summit Racing 15106 / 6AN / $62
      • Jay Racing Bosch 044 Check Valves (Inlet/Outlet
        Note: When I was researching their site was down. I need more info on this check valve.
        Quote Originally Posted by jayracing.com
        Finally, a quick and easy solution to adding a high-flow check valve to your Bosch fuel pump. These neat little check valves attach directly to the Bosch 044 fuel pump (or others with a M12 x 1.5 female thread outlet). Machined from billet aluminum, the outlet end is -8AN (also available in -6AN).

        This will maintain fuel pressure in the lines to decrease/eliminate priming time. Also this will help fight pressure fluctuations on the pump itself, especially when used in a multiple fuel pump application such as two pumps in parallel.


      Fuel Pumps
      You need more fueling when you are using bigger injectors and can no longer flow enough fuel into your engine. In other words, if under high boost you are loosing fuel pressure your pumps can not keep up with the flow. The pumps we put on these cars rarely have a problem keeping up with the pressure...it's the flow numbers that are the problems.

      Normally a standard in-tank fuel pump will feed the in-line fuel pump. The in-line fuel pump will feed the engine during high demand periods but can not sustain that high demand. The in-tank fuel pump can not feed enough fuel to the in-line fuel pump and you will have fuel starvation under sustained WOT driving. If you fall under this category then a surge-tank is for you.

      Also, before choosing a fuel pump double check that it handles your fuel type. If you add for instance, E-85 to the mix, not all fuel pumps can handle this. You've been warned. Read the datasheets.

      Quote Originally Posted by Richard_Cranium
      you MUST PAY ATTENTION to the instructions with certain fuel pumps. not all of them are "pull" type. the A-1000 is the first that comes to mind. it is a "pusher" type pump, and needs to be gravity fed or pumped to feed it. it "may" run for a bit pulling fuel, but it wont last for long. some are pull-type pumps that can pull fuel as well as push. then there is the low-pressure high flow versus high pressure pumps as well. if using inline pumps and a surge tank, it would be good for a low pressure high flow pump to feed the surge, and then high pressure out of the surge to the motor. this way the surge is always full.
      Very good overview of many pumps
      ...I need to insert graphs into these

      • Walbro 255LPH - High Pressure Pump
        Mfg Part # GSL392
        Capable of supporting ~400WHP cars
        Free Flow Rate: 255 LPH @ 3BAR
        Inlet: 10mm x 1.0 (Female)
        Outlet: 10mm x 1.0 (female)
        Inlet/ Outlet fittings can be sourced from www.fuel-pumps.net or ATP Turbo


        Install Kit @ USRT
        ATP Turbo / Walbro 255LPH / $129
      • Bosch 0 580 254 044 Inline Fuel Pump aka. Bosch '044' fuel pump
        Bosch Data Sheet

        Bosch 044 fuel pumps mount inline (out side of your gas tank), most commonly rear center under your car or truck. Each Bosch 044 inline fuel pump provides 300LPH of flow and operate at 72.5 PSI. Bosch 044 fuel pumps are comparable to the Walbro 255LPH high pressure inline fuel pumps which can both support vehicles for up to 600-700 horse power. Can be used in sequence with an intank Walbro or Bosch 040 fuel pump.

        Bosch 044 Fuel Pump Specs:
        Bosch Part Number: 0 580 254 044
        Minimum Current: 12 Volts
        Operating Pressure: 72.5 PSI (5 Bar)
        Minimum Flow @ Outlet: 80 GPH (300 LPH)
        Fuel Pump Location: In-Line
        High Temperature Reduction: 8 GPH (30 LPH)
        Weight: 1030 Grams (2.27 Pounds)

        Fuel Pump Connections:
        Inlet: M18 x 1.5
        Outlet: M12 x 1.5
        Electrical: Positive M6 / Negative M5




        Integrated Engineering / $225
        Loose Bolts Motorsports / $180

      • Bosch 0 580 254 040 In Tank Fuel Pump

        Bosch 040 fuel pumps are universal style in tank fuel pump replacements recommended for vehicles exceeding OE specifications. The Bosch 0-580-254-040 fuel pump is one of the only in tank fuel pump that can be compared with the Walbro 255LPH High Pressure series fuel pumps for use in vehicles with up to 700 horsepower.

        the bosch in-tank will not drop into a mk4 pump basket. The bosch in-tank is to be used for custom in-tank fuel feeds.

        Bosch 040 Fuel Pump Specs:
        Bosch Part Number: 0580254040
        Minimum Current: 12 Volts
        Operating Pressure: 94 PSI (6.5 Bar)
        Minimum Flow @ Outlet: 80 GPH (300 LPH)
        Fuel Pump Location: In Tank
        High Temperature Reduction: 8 GPH (30 LPH)
        Weight: 930 Grams (2.05 Pounds)

        Fuel Pump Connections:
        Inlet: Open Base
        Outlet: M10 x 1.0
        Electrical: Positive M6 / Negative M5

        Bosch Fuel Pumps / $200
      • APR in-tank
        Fits into the factory A4 platform (A4, TT, GTI, Jetta) and perhaps others (people fill me in here) stock fuel pump pickup. This is by far the EASIEST fueling upgrade as you don't have to do anything else. Just pull the stock fuel pump and drop this in for an instant fueling upgrade to fuel your project.

        Supposedly link link the APR in-tank fuel pump finds its origins in the Audi TT225 model. For the TT225 APR stg3 GT2871r kit APR supplies an additional inline fuel pump which hints at the horsepower cap capable by this fuel pump alone. This makes me believe that this fuel pump is capable of supplying fuel for ~350HP. The TT225 is an AWD model and has a different gas tank and thus you can't just buy a TT225 fuel pump instead. APR modified the pickup to fit the FWD fuel tank.
        Flows xxx liters/hour
        Can sustain 44 PSI (3bar) fuel pressure (unconfirmed...)

        MJM Autohaus / $200
      • Bosch Motorsports 413
        Quote Originally Posted by USRT
        An elite-level part from Bosch Motorsports, flow is maintained at up to 8bar fuel pressure.

        USRT/ $495
      • Deatsch Werks DW300 In-Tank Pump

        $169 @ Deatschwerks.com
      • Genesis Mk4 High-Flow Intank Pump
        This pump is a direct drop-in manufactured for Genesis by Siemens VDO. It is visually identical to the original factory parts and thusly uses the same factory fuel line, etc. The pump is already installed in a brand new surge tank which elminates any chance of fuel starvation when cornering. This solution is rated to support up to 400HP (at which point stock fuel lines become restrictive).
        Code:
        Genesis Mk4 Intank Pump Flow Rate	  
        	  
        PSIG	Amps	Lbs/Hr	Gal/Hr	Ltr/Hr	Ltr/Min	CC/Min	Flow Gain	  
        40	 5.8	 176	 29.33	 111.04	 1.85	 1850.69	21.4%	  
        45	 6	 164	 27.33	 103.47	 1.72	 1724.51	26.2%	  
        50	 6.2	 148	 24.67	 93.38	 1.56	 1556.26	23.3%	  
        55	 6.4	 136	 22.67	 85.8	 1.43	 1430.08	22.5%	  
        60	 5.9	 151	 25.17	 95.27	 1.59	 1587.81	55.7%	  
        65	 6.1	 142	 23.67	 89.59	 1.49	 1493.17	71.1%	  
        70	 6.3	 132	 22	 83.28	 1.39	 1388.02	85.9%	  
        	  	  	  	  	  	  
        OEM Mk4 (non-R32/TT225) Intank Fuel Pump Flow Rate	
          	  	  	  
        PSIG	Amps	Lbs/Hr	Gal/Hr	Ltr/Hr	Ltr/Min	CC/Min	  	  
        40	 8	 145	 24.17	 91.48	 1.52	 1524.72	  	  
        45	 8.4	 130	 21.67	 82.02	 1.37	 1366.99	  	  
        50	 8.7	 120	 20	 75.71	 1.26	 1261.83	  	  
        55	 8.9	 111	 18.5	 70.03	 1.17	 1167.2	  	  
        60	 9.3	 97	 16.17	 61.2	 1.02	 1019.98	  	  
        65	 9.4	 83	 13.83	 52.37	 0.87	 872.77	  	  
        70	 9.7	 71	 11.83	 44.8	 0.75	 746.58	  
        .
        .
        .
        .
        .
        .


        $249 @ USRT
      • Aeromotive A1000
        Quote Originally Posted by USRT
        Built to aerospace standards, this is one serious pump. Use only with a fuel cell or resevoir-sumped fuel tank. -10AN fuel line to a pre-filter, -8AN to the fuel rail, and -6AN return line are required for best results.
        The reason for the fuel cell/ res tank note is because this is a push-type pump. Not a push/ pull pump. It needs to be either fed, or gravity fed. It will not pull. It would also work well if you put a low pressure, high volume pump behind it.
        A good example of this is Richard_Cranium's new build where he has a fuel cell and an A1000 under it at his front driver's side corner.





        USRT / $315
      • Walbro In-Tank
        This pump has the same specs as the Walbro 255LPH listed above, but has the right casing to fit in the stock fuel tank. It's a drop in replacement for the OEM pump. The downside to it is it will have fuel starvation under high g loads. As per USRT,
        Quote Originally Posted by USRT
        This single stage pump is only recommend for use in conjunction with a surge tank to eliminate fuel starvation problems at less then 1/4 tank. Fully-compatible with stock fuel lines.
        USRT / $140
      • Walbro 400 LPH Fuel PUMP
        NOT E85 compatible

      • Weldon
      • MagnaFuel
      • Fuelab 40401
        Billet, comes with mounting bracket, designed to be quieter than most of the competition
        Internal Speed Controller that is controllable via external PWM signal
        [im]http://images.amazon.com/images/G/01/richmedia/images/cover.gif[/img]
        Amazon/ $384
      • Barry Grant


      Fuel Pump Mounting Kits
      • 034 motorsports Bosch 044 / 005 In-Tank Mounting Kit

        034 / $350 with 005 pump
      • Bosch 044 Bracket w/ Isolation Rubber

        Tweakit Performance / $44
      • Bosch 044 Bracket - Stainless
        T bolt style. Fits 60mm fuel pumps


        Jay Racing / $35
      • Bosch 044 Bracket - Aluminum
        Has 2 x M8x1.25 threaded holes on bottom for mounting

        Jay Racing / $50
      • Aluminum 2" OD mounting bracket
        Fits fuel filters such as Golan, aeromotive, weldon, K&N, Mr. Gasket, and others
        Incorporates M8 or 5/16" socket head screw for clamping and mounting


        $50 / Jay Racing
      • Generic 2.13" to 2.44" Mounting Bracket

        Shown with a water pump instead...

        Frozen Boost.com / $7
      • Universal Relay'd Fuel Pump Wiring Harness
        Integrated Engineering / $65




      Fuel Pressure Regulators

      Terminology:
      rising rate FPR - Source: SpeedingG60

      the way that works, is you set base pressure. i run ~56psi base. which is set static. fuel pump running with car off.\ so the fuel running out of thr injectors does not play a part in the equation. the rising rate fuel pressure regulator lets +1psi fuel for every +1psi boost. so when you are running 10psi with a 56psi base fuel pressure, the fuel pressure is 66 psi (to overcome the 10 psi positive pressure in the manifold to keep it at 56psi). but the fuel is still only 56psi.

      • RMR FPR Adapter
        Allows Stock Bosch style FPR to convert to -6AN inlet/outlet. Very nice for hanging off the end of an aftermarket fuel rail

        Integrated Engineering / $75
      • Braun Brenner OEM FPR Adapter
        Allows feed and return to both come off the FPR...this means your fuel rail can have one end capped off. Otherwise it's just like the RMR FPR adapter.
      • Stock

        Integrated Engineering / $80
      • Aeromotive
        Pressure Range (BAR): 2.85 - 6.65
        Pressure (PSI): 30 - 70

        USRT / $139
      • Not sure who makes this???
        Drops into stock Bosch FPR socket
        Pressure Range (BAR): 3 - 5
        Pressure Range (PSI): 43.5 - 72.5

        USRT / $99
      • Fuelab 53501/ 53502 / 54501/ 54502
        xxx01 is adjustable up to 125 PSI
        xxx02 is custom pressure requirements
        535xx is return line on bottom
        545xx is return line on opposite side of feed line

        You can also get a 515/525 regulator..but they do the same thing, weigh 50% more, and are larger

        Quote Originally Posted by fuelab
        FUELAB® 535 Series Fuel Pressure Regulators have all the same great features as our 515 series, only smaller and weigh 50% less. They accept port style and non-port style union fittings without interference. Several configurations are available, supporting fuel injected applications up to 125 PSID. The 535 Series Fuel Pressure Regulator has a -6AN return port located on the bottom.
        Dimensions: 1.50” D x 2.00” W x 2.25” H
        Weighs Only: 5.25 oz.
        Fuel Pressure Regulator Features:
        Two -6AN inlet ports and one -6AN return port
        Gasoline, diesel, methanol, and ethanol fuel compatible
        Billet Aluminum with anodize per military MIL-A-8625, Type II
        Fine thread pitch for precise pressure adjustment
        Versatile mounting bracket and stainless steel hardware
        1/8” NPT gauge port with plug for external pressure gauge
        1/8” NPT pressure reference port with barbed fitting
        Backed by a 2-year limited warranty

        ~$140 depending on exact model


      Fuel Filters

      Rule of thumb with fuel filters...100 micron inlet, 10 micron out. This means put a 100 micron filter pre-fuel pump and a 10 micron filter post pump. The weak filter will save your fuel pump, the good filter will save your injectors. The aeromotive 10 micron and 100 micron filters are the same size so be careful not to mix them up.

      If you are running E-85 you need a SS mesh element...but it's tricky. Look into the E-85 issues before going down this path.

      • Aeromotive Fuel Filters
        http://aeromotiveinc.com/products-page/fuel-filters/
      • Jegs Billet (Long) In-Line Fuel Filter
        Quote Originally Posted by jegs
        CNC-machined from Billet aluminum and features a laser etched JEGS logo, 9" long x 2" diameter housing and built in AN fittings. No need to purchase adapters, just add your hose ends and go. Includes a 10-micron cellulose (gasoline only) element for applications up to 1000 HP. Available in blue or black anodized finish and -8AN or -10AN male fittings.

        Jegs 555-150070 / $59
      • Jegs replacement fuel filter element for above fuel filter
        Quote Originally Posted by jegs
        Replacement Element
        10 Micron Cellulose (Paper) For Use With Gasoline Only
        Fits JEGS 555-150070, 555-150071, 555-150072, 555-150073; Russell Profilter 799-649000 and BG Inline 132-171043 & 132-171044 filter housings


        Jegs 555-150030 / $17


      Surge Tanks
      Surge tanks are for high performance use.

      • 034 Motorsports Surge Tank
        The 034Motorsport FP34 is the most advanced 044 fuel pump installation solution available, fully enclosing a Bosch 044 fuel pump inside a 1 liter reservoir, the FP34 allows flexible mounting location and optimal flow from the 044 pump.


        Example install of surge tank on mk4

        $225 @ 034 motorsports
      • With Submerged Bosch 044 Pump
        Outer Dimensions: 5.5" X 8" x 4.25"
        3 x O ring boss -6 AN inlet/ outlets
        Interior Volume 1.5L

        Integrated Engineering / $199
      • With Submerged Dual Bosch 044 Pumps
        Outer Dimensions: 4.25" x 6" x 8" (HxWxD)




        Integrated Engineering / $299
      • Single 044 - For custom work

        Integrated Engineering - $109
      • Dual 044 - For custom work

        Integrated Engineering - $149



      Fuel Pressure Senders
      For use with electronic gauges. Very useful if you want a fuel pressure gauge in the cabin. The gauges that take a fuel line should not be brought into the cabin for safety reasons. If you need to look at the fuel pressure while driving then make the gauge exposed through the windshield and look from there.
      Last edited by groggory; 05-31-2012 at 02:18 PM.

    4. Moderator groggory's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 21st, 2003
      Location
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      Posts
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      Vehicles
      2002 VW GTI 1.8 BT
      07-09-2010 03:38 AM #4
      Tools
      The stainless needs to be double annealed if you are doing double flares...or it will split.
      Use these when you decide to work with hardline
      • Rigid 345 Flaring Tool
        For making 45 degree, SAE flares
        Spec'd for soft copper, brass, aluminum and mild steel (JIC and Bundy) tubing
      • Snap on Tube cutter + double flaring SAE set

        Snap On TF528D / $140
      • Summit Racing 37 degree flaring tool
        Flare Tool, Single, 37 Degree Flare, Tube Sizes 3/16, 1/4, 5/16, 3/8, 1/2 in., Kit
        This tool won't hold up for stainless. Use it for mild steel, aluminum, etc etc

        Summit Racing SUM-900311 / $30
      • Imperial Eastman IMP 400-F , 37 degree flaring tool
        This tool will do everything you want. Stainless Steel, Titanium, Aluminum, whatever....Great tool.
        Quote Originally Posted by Newman Tools
        For 3/16", 1/4", 5/16", 3/8", 1/2" and 5/8" O.D. tubing.

        Forms 37o flares to Government Specifications in steel stainless steel (including MIL-T-6843), titanium and other metal tubing. Positive stopgauge assures correct size of flare. Special burnishing action polishes flare face. Three rollersin flaring cone rollout 37o above die block. Roller action cuts effort required; maintians original wall thickness-eliminates stress concentration. Extension on yoke for clamping in vise. Furnished in sturdy tool case.
        Conforms to Federal Specification GGG-F-451a. Type 1, Class 1, Style A.

        Drill Spot / $400
      • XRP aluminum vise jaws.
        Designed to protect shape and finish of hose ends and fittings during hose assembly. Each jaw has a magnetic backing to hold it firmly in the vice. Sold in pairs.
        http://www.goodvibesracing.com/moreinfo.php
        $18.95
      • Jerry Bickels Roto Flair Tool
        For 37 degree flares
        Quote Originally Posted by Jerrybickel.com
        For easy, precise and blemish free flaring of tubing. O/S diameters of 1/8", 3/16", 1/4", 5/16", 3/8", 1/2", 5/8", an 3/4". Exact tube insertion height is controlled automatically for perfect fairs every time.

        Jerry Bickel / $100
      • Mastercool 71480 , 37deg flaring and double flaring hydraulic kit
        This will do all your 37 degree flares with ease

        Automotive tools online / $220
      • Mastercool 72029 Reduced Friction Ball Bearing Tube Cutter

        Automotive Tools Online / $21
      • Mastercool 70069 , 4-in-1 tube bender
        Quote Originally Posted by automotive tools online
        Open side design slips over tube at any point. Makes smooth short radius bends up to 90 Degree with minimal effort. Calibrated to show angle of bend.
        Easy 90 Degree start requires much less effort to make fast and accurate bends. All metal multi-purpose tube bender for 3/16", 1/4", 5/16" and 3/8" 4 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm O.D. tubing

        Automotive Tools Online / $20
      • AN Crimp Tools
        Great list of AN tools by Earl
      • Earl AN Crimping Tool (requires below mentioned dies)
        Earl 40-D031ERL
        Crimping tool and dies are used to crimp the aluminum collar on Auto Crimp hose ends. Designed to give a maximum pressure rating to Auto-Crimp hose ends when using Pro-Lite hose.

        MPSRacing / $707
      • Earl AN Crimping Dies for Earl 40-D031ERL Crimping Tool
        40-D03104ERL Earl's Crimping Die Size 4AN
        40-D03106ERL Earl's Crimping Die Size 6AN
        40-D03108ERL Earl's Crimping Die Size 8AN

        Use the appropriate die for auto-crimp hose ends

        MPSRacing / $96 per size
      • Earl Pressure Testing Kit
        40-D016ERL

        Every hose assembly should be pressure tested prior to installation. Earl's pressure test kit makes it easy to test field-assembled kits with either compressed air or nitrogen. Consists of fitting with air valve in each size and matching plugs.

        Covers sizes 3 through 16.


        MPSRacing / $157
      • Aluminum Vice Jaws
        These handy vise jaw liners help prevent scratching of anodized aluminum hose ends during assembly. Internal magnets hold the extruded aluminum liners securely to most popular bench vises. The jaws are available in both of the standard jaw widths and are designed to hold almost any soft part without marking its surface. Earl's assembly department uses these jaws.

        40-004ERL Earl's Aluminum Vice Jaws - 3" Jaw Width
        40-005ERL Earl's Aluminum Vice Jaws - 5" Jaw Width

        MPS Racing / ~$15
      • Rubber Tubing Assembly Lube
        Earl's 40-184004ERL
        Use this to get the rubber tubing onto the hose ends. Fuel tubing fits TIGHT

        MPS Racing / $9


      Fuel Pressure Gauges
      These are for engine side use only. Do not bring these gauges into the cabin.
      • Auto Meter #105-4363-M Sender + Gauge


        Jegs / $227
      • 0-100 PSI Gauge
        1.5" face

        USRT / $20
      • 0-120 PSI
        Fuelab
      • VDO 0-60 PSI Gauge

        Jegs 918-153008 / $22
      • VDO 0-100 PSI Gauge

        Jegs 918-153003 / $20


      Fuel Rails
      • Racecraft
      • Baun Brenner
        Quote Originally Posted by Braun Brenner
        VW / Audi 1.8T Fuel Rail Kit. This fuel rail bolts right in as a direct replacement of the inferior and restrictive factory rail. Larger passages for increased fuel flow. The aluminum body helps to keep the fuel cooler aiding in the prevention of detonation and increasing fuel system performance. Solid billet aluminum construction with O-ring port seals ensures leak free performance even under increased fuel pressure conditions. CNC Machined in-house from 6061-T6 aluminum. Brackets are laser cut and brake formed from stainless steel for a perfect fit and lasting quality every time. New! Includes XRP AN Fitting (Anodized Red/Blue) with o-ring seal. Optional FPR adapter and fpr shown in picture are not included.



        $145 @ Baun Brenner
      • RMR
        7/12/10 - Note: This is a discontinued part. They are selling what they have and there are vendors here and there that carry it.

        -6AN Inlet/Outlet
        Quote Originally Posted by RMR Racing
        The 20v VW Fuel Rail is CNC machined from billet T6061 Aluminum stock and is made to replace your stock oem rail to provide you with more fuel flow for your high horsepower applications. This fuel rail is designed for the 1.8T engine and made to be used with either stock or Bosch Style Non-Stock Injectors (pictured).This is attainable due to the fact that we include machined spacers which allow you to space the rail in order to fit the bosch style injectors under the rail. Typical uses are for people doing programmable engine management where low impedance injectors are a must for idle quality.
        Note: Images of Fuel Rail mounted are on an RMR 1.8t Intake Manifold (also out of production)





      • USRT 1.8t fuel rail
        Quote Originally Posted by USRT
        Mounts to any stock or USRT short runner 1.8T intake manifold. Also fits USRT 16v short runner intake manifolds and USRT ITBs. Features a clear annodized finish to protect against the elements and alternative fuels. Kit includes rail, -6AN fittings with o-rings, stainless steel clamps, and stainless steel hardware. A smart choice for 300+ hp.

        $125 / USRT



      Fuel Injectors
      I created another thread to tackle this issue. It's worth a read here

      Common Configurations
      Great Discussion on in-tank + other options

      • Adding a adjustable FPR + Electronic Fuel Pressure Gauge + Analog Fuel Pressure Gauge
        Photos courtesy of Richard_Cranium
      • Adding an RMR Fuel Rail + RMR FPR Adapter to an otherwise factory setup
        This is a common upgrade if you are changing your manifold. Most aftermarket manifolds won't accept the factory fuel rail. The SEM intake manifold is an exception to this, it will hold the factory fuel rail.
      • Adding a fuel rail to a heavily modded setup
        Taken from Richard_Cranium's Setups...
        -8AN into rail, and -6AN into the FPR and -6AN return to fuel cell. no issues.
        or
        -10AN into rail, and -6AN from rail to FPR and -6AN from FPR to cell. no issues. (Big flowing E-85 build with 1680cc injectors) (Fed from dual 044's)

        Note: If you are going to run asymmetric fuel lines (intake vs. return) you need to be sure your return can handle the overflow from the FPR. If you don't take this into account you could potentially experience pressure surging on the fuel rail when the FPR can't dump the excess pressure enough. An example of this would be Richard's -10AN setup above. In my opinion, if he were running say 300cc injectors they wouldn't make a dent in that amount of fuel volume going into the fuel rail...thus, a lot of fuel would have to be returned via the return line. If the return line was largely undersized it would cause a pressure buildup in the fuel rail. Instead of say, 4BAR + 25 lbs of boost being sent to the injectors all the extra pressure would act as a base, so say 6BAR + 25 lbs of boost would hit the injectors causing you to run a very rich condition.

        So in short, run asymmetric lines with care. If you don't know how to size, just run symmetric lines.
      • Adding an inline fuel pump to an otherwise factory setup
        This is a common upgrade to sustain higher fuel pressures and larger flow rates.
        ...My question...If the stock pump flows x LPH and the inline pump flows y LPH, wouldn't you be limited to x LPH and you could only flow y LPH based on the amount of fuel sitting in the fuel line behind the inline pump?
      • Adding a surge tank + Inline
        Low pressure in-tank pump feeds surge tank
        In-line pump pulls fuel from surge tank
        Return line from engine feeds main fuel tank
        Courtesy of K20017



      • VR6t Setup
        Courtesy of K20017







      • Adding a surge tank + dual Inline
        Low pressure in-tank pump feeds surge tank
        Surge tank feeds each of the inline pumps
        One way check valves come off each pump
        Check valves go into a y-splitter
        y-splitter feeds engine
        Return line from engine feeds main fuel tank

        From Richard Cranium's new Audi Build





      • Getting ready for E85
        It takes ~30% more E85 to reach the same power levels compared to unleaded gasoline. E85 runs like a high octane gas does, but it has a lower energy density so it takes more to do the same thing. It's like running a race fuel with the side benefit of making your MPG's go down the tubes (but far cheaper than race fuel).
      • Getting ready for a very powerful E85 build (>500 WHP)
      • Trunk mounted 034 motorsport / INA surge tank
        Courtesy of: leonardodecappiccuno




      Car Specific

      Mk1 GTI
      Quote Originally Posted by Richard_Cranium
      rabbit MK1 GTI the lines run from pass side rear tire area under the car up to the engine bay.

      the problem area is the steering rack.

      i did this a long time ago on mine, with 1/2" SS tubing. and the rack was the issue. i changed it to Summit twist tite style, and the rack ate the line on a hard turn. i was in the garage luckily, but still the $16/gal fuel it spilled hurt my ego LOL.



      [*][b]Porsche 996 w/ E85 ... Dual '044 pumps ... gravity feed
      Link
      Link2
      [*][b]Gravity Feed Pump w/ 044
      Courtesy of DieGTI
      Quote Originally Posted by DieGTI
      I run this unit to gravity feed my A1000 system using a stock lifter pump/sending unit. The capacity of this $72 surge tank is .75 gallons or 2.88 liters. The overflow to the fuel tank is the very top fitting so the tank utilizes maximum capacity.




      [*]Custom fuel cell with dual 044 fuel pumps
      This one is courtesy of newto20v

      He plans on adding 90deg down bends from the interior filters to the bottom of the fuel cell. That way it'll have less chance of fuel starvation at lower fuel levels. He used the Integrated Engineering 044 tank plates and custom fab'd them into this fuel cell.
      i sunk the two 044 pumps into the fuel cell. less fittings, more space, cool the pumps, quiet them down.






      [/QUOTE]
      Last edited by groggory; 02-09-2012 at 02:45 PM.

    5. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      2002 VW GTI 1.8 BT
      07-09-2010 03:47 AM #5
      More example setups...

      One-Eight GTI's Setup
      Well I have my new fuel lines hooked up at the manifold



      I purchased these fittings from Jegs

      They work on the factory lines that come into bay (in fact there so tight once there on and click there is no way to remove them


      But they will not work at all on the lines in back by rear passenger side wheel where the lines come down where fuel filter used to be... And when I say they will not work I messed with it for a couple hours trying to force it on, I have bruised palms from doing it... I repeat they will not work, cant force it on enough to make it click



      Gonna order one of these and see if they will work from Jegs here is the PDF on how they work
      http://www.jegs.com/InstallationInst...799-641300.pdf




      I have some intercooler piping coming in tomorrow so I can start fabbing up the new lines to connect to IM

      Last edited by groggory; 05-07-2012 at 01:33 PM.

    6. Member schwartzmagic's Avatar
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      Location
      MIA
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      07-09-2010 11:00 AM #6
      Thank baby jesus someone is finally doing this.

    7. Member gtimitch's Avatar
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      07-09-2010 11:06 AM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by schwartzmagic View Post
      Thank baby jesus someone is finally doing this.
      Excellent information post...Thanks.

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      07-09-2010 11:25 AM #8
      www.jayracing.com

      makes some very nice Bosch 044 Check Valves $50/pc


      I also have seen on some various sources that the Aluminum Hard line isn't compatible for the pressures of a fuel injection system.
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    9. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      07-09-2010 02:41 PM #9
      moved...
      Last edited by groggory; 07-10-2010 at 04:58 PM.

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      07-09-2010 02:48 PM #10
      this should be a sticky and we should all work on gathering information to make it a solid resources for the forums as a whole.
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      07-09-2010 07:45 PM #11
      The adapter to go from 5/16th's oem to -6AN will indeed fit the factory fuel line.
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      07-10-2010 11:28 AM #13
      Bosch 0 580 254 044 Inline Fuel Pump

      Bosch 044 fuel pumps mount inline (out side of your gas tank), most commonly rear center under your car or truck. Each Bosch 044 inline fuel pump provides 300LPH of flow and operate at 72.5 PSI. Bosch 044 fuel pumps are comparable to the Walbro 255LPH high pressure inline fuel pumps which can both support vehicles for up to 600-700 horse power. Can be used in sequence with an intank Walbro or Bosch 040 fuel pump.

      Bosch 044 Fuel Pump Specs:
      Bosch Part Number: 0 580 254 044
      Minimum Current: 12 Volts
      Operating Pressure: 72.5 PSI (5 Bar)
      Minimum Flow @ Outlet: 80 GPH (300 LPH)
      Fuel Pump Location: In-Line
      High Temperature Reduction: 8 GPH (30 LPH)
      Weight: 1030 Grams (2.27 Pounds)

      Fuel Pump Connections:
      Inlet: M18 x 1.5
      Outlet: M12 x 1.5
      Electrical: Positive M6 / Negative M5

      Sourced from www.boschfuelpumps.com

    13. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      07-10-2010 04:45 PM #14
      Quote Originally Posted by Dub-Nub View Post
      Bosch 0 580 254 044 Inline Fuel Pump

      Bosch 044 fuel pumps mount inline (out side of your gas tank), most commonly rear center under your car or truck. Each Bosch 044 inline fuel pump provides 300LPH of flow and operate at 72.5 PSI. Bosch 044 fuel pumps are comparable to the Walbro 255LPH high pressure inline fuel pumps which can both support vehicles for up to 600-700 horse power. Can be used in sequence with an intank Walbro or Bosch 040 fuel pump.

      Bosch 044 Fuel Pump Specs:
      Bosch Part Number: 0 580 254 044
      Minimum Current: 12 Volts
      Operating Pressure: 72.5 PSI (5 Bar)
      Minimum Flow @ Outlet: 80 GPH (300 LPH)
      Fuel Pump Location: In-Line
      High Temperature Reduction: 8 GPH (30 LPH)
      Weight: 1030 Grams (2.27 Pounds)

      Fuel Pump Connections:
      Inlet: M18 x 1.5
      Outlet: M12 x 1.5
      Electrical: Positive M6 / Negative M5

      Sourced from www.boschfuelpumps.com
      Thanks. Added that in. Also, added some additional 044 info, info on the walbro's, and some bits here and there.

      If anyone can chime in on any of the sections that very much need work please do. I'll edit your responses into the main posts.

      Thanks.

    14. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      07-10-2010 04:46 PM #15
      moved....
      Last edited by groggory; 07-11-2010 at 08:57 PM.

    15. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      07-11-2010 06:11 PM #16
      Bump. Added gauges, more fuel pump specific fittings, some adapters, more fuel pumps, adj FPRs, and fixed a few typos

      Can anyone answer any of the questions in post # 15?

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      07-11-2010 07:43 PM #17
      Quote Originally Posted by groggory View Post
      Questions:

      Can aluminum tubing be used for the fueling inlet? not usually as it does not have the pressure capabilities needed.

      What are the advantages to Stainless braided hose over twist-tite or Aeroquip AQP socketless hose? Conversely, are there situations where both shine? Aeroquip/twist tite is one time use IIRC. you have to cut it off to get it off the fitting, thus shortening your line length.

      When using Aeroquip AQP socketless connections, do you have to use a hose clamp? NO. have you ever tried to pull one off? better yet, have you ever tried to assemble these lines? its a major PITA.... i have alot of this i was going to use, and the PITA factor made me throw it on the shelf and use some Summit style hoses for the oil filter relocate/cooler setup. it is some burly ass hose for sure.

      When using Summit Racing Twist-Tite hoses/connectors, do you have to use a hose clamp? see above, but no i never have....

      What are the preferred style of hose clamps for fuel hose? Any example sources? not sure of preferred, but its wise to use double clamps on high pressure lines, like what i have on my TPI'd 4x4 truck.

      Are Viton o-rings the right kind of o-rings to use for AN-oring connections? depends on the fuel use. but usually Viton or Buna-N....

      Also, can anyone chime in on when to use what kind of tubing? use what works, fits, you can afford, and will meet the demands of the system in question.

      Also, is Aeroquip AQP stainless braided interchangeable with Summit Racing Stainless braided meaning will the two tubing types work in all of the compression fittings? should be

      How do you use these auto crimp collars? http://www.summitracing.com/search/P...Crimp-Collars/ with the special CRIMPERS they sell to do it. http://www.summitracing.com/parts/EAR-D03106ERL/
      that said, this was a very well thought out post.

      i use the Jay Racing check valves.... good product.

      this forum needs more of this type of stuff really.


      the best price on 044's i have found, for REAL 044's, is LooseBoltsMotorsports.com. i run dual 044's with Jay Racing check valves into -10AN and on to the fuel rail.

      a few more parts you can add is Racecraft fuel rails, and Fuelab FPR's.

      you have to watch FPRs as the Aeromotive stuff is not super high pressure compatible. also, Weldon, MagnaFuel, Fuelab, Barry Grant, many other pumps available as well.

      then there is filters, and material and sizing of the elements. rule of thumb is 100 micron in and 10 micron out. but when you get to E-85 where you need a SS mesh element, it gets tricky.

      you also need to be aware of what pump can handle what fuel.

      also the injectors, what fuels can they handle? but i guess injectors would be a WHOLE DIFFERENT thread, now, wouldnt they? LOL


      one can also use SS hard line tubing for fueling needs. it has tremendous pressure handling capabilities, looks nice, and is not very expensive. much like what i run on my wastegate control lines. it takes some skill to be a good bender, but you can do alot with it with some practice.

      a few other tips? get a set of the vice jaws if you plan to do any major amount of SS braided line assembling. worh the 35 bucks or whatever.

      and when cutting the braided line, i wrap it a few times TIGHT with electrical tape, then cut it with a thin blade on a grinder. take some snips (i like green for this) and trim the little pokies off and it goes right in the fitting with no frays. you can believe me on this or not; i have assembled many many braided AN lines for these past two race cars of mine.

      lastly, you MUST PAY ATTENTION to the instructions with certain fuel pumps. not all of them are "pull" type. the A-1000 is the first that comes to mind. it is a "pusher" type pump, and needs to be gravity fed or pumped to feed it. it "may" run for a bit pulling fuel, but it wont last for long. some are pull-type pumps that can pull fuel as well as push. then there is the low-pressure high flow versus high pressure pumps as well. if using inline pumps and a surge tank, it would be good for a low pressure high flow pump to feed the surge, and then high pressure out of the surge to the motor. this way the surge is always full.
      Last edited by Richard_Cranium; 07-11-2010 at 07:49 PM.

    17. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      07-11-2010 08:59 PM #18
      Lots of updates.

      Questions below still remain.

      I've put a lot of time into this post so please give it a read-through to check for accuracy. Looks pretty good to me so far though.

      Questions:


      What path in a Corrado do the fuel lines run (In case of total replacement)? Any notes on install ?(estimated line lengths, problem areas, etc etc)

      What path in a mk1 golf/ GTI do the fuel lines run (In case of total replacement)? Any notes on install ?(estimated line lengths, problem areas, etc etc)

      What path in a mk2 golf/ GTI do the fuel lines run (In case of total replacement)? Any notes on install ?(estimated line lengths, problem areas, etc etc)

      What path in a mk3 golf/ GTI do the fuel lines run (In case of total replacement)? Any notes on install ?(estimated line lengths, problem areas, etc etc)

      What path in a mk4 golf/ GTI do the fuel lines run (In case of total replacement)? Any notes on install ?(estimated line lengths, problem areas, etc etc)

      What path in a b5 Passat/ A4 do the fuel lines run (In case of total replacement)?
      Any notes on install ?(estimated line lengths, problem areas, etc etc)

      Of the fuel pumps that I have listed, which pumps would you recommend for what applications?

      How does the bosch 413 stack up to dual bosch 044's?
      Last edited by groggory; 07-11-2010 at 09:09 PM.

    18. Member i2ickei242's Avatar
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      07-11-2010 11:50 PM #19
      THANK YOU!!!!
      "Turn up the boost & see what shakes loose."

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    19. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      07-12-2010 01:24 AM #20
      Wow! I was over on fuelab's website looking at their fuel pumps (very nice, btw) and I never realized fuel pumps draw such huge amounts of current....Especially at high pressure levels.

      I really like their feature that lets you tune the pressure level so you aren't pulling full current all the time (and so you aren't pushing tons of fuel through your return line hose).

      Cool stuff.

    20. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      07-12-2010 03:19 PM #21
      Bump.

      I'm still working on making this thread better. Been adding more products and information.

      Could use some links to additional fuel rails for the 1.8t.

      Could use some more pics of installed aftermarket fuel systems with mention of what car it is and any notes about the install. Parts, difficult situations, success, problems, etc.

      Any notes on any of the parts I've mentioned. Have you had success with them? Failure with them? Etc?

      If this is going to be a good reference post I need to make sure all of the information is sound so I don't send 'students' out into the world with incorrect facts.

      Thanks for helping me to make this a better 1.8t forum!

    21. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      07-12-2010 04:24 PM #22
      On this picture..


      Why do you have filters on both the inlet and the outlet of the pump? I assume the inlet is to protect the pump and the outlet is to protect the motor.

      Also I assume that you can put a mediocre filter on the inlet and a very good filter on the outlet.

      For instance, one of the little stubby 100 micron jegs filters on the inlets and one of the huge 6 micron filters on the outlet?

    22. Member gtimitch's Avatar
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      09-27-2010 07:54 PM #23
      Now why isn't this a sticky by now? there is an enormous amount of information shared here and it is very valuable to the entire 1.8 community. Please consider it for a sticky.

      This is very helpful as well...
      then there is filters, and material and sizing of the elements. rule of thumb is 100 micron in and 10 micron out. but when you get to E-85 where you need a SS mesh element, it gets tricky.
      Last edited by gtimitch; 09-27-2010 at 08:01 PM.

    23. Member schwartzmagic's Avatar
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      09-29-2010 04:31 PM #24
      Quote Originally Posted by gtimitch View Post
      Now why isn't this a sticky by now? there is an enormous amount of information shared here and it is very valuable to the entire 1.8 community. Please consider it for a sticky.

      X 2

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      10-01-2010 09:31 AM #25
      Quote Originally Posted by schwartzmagic View Post
      X 2
      Moderators, this is valuable, please place it as a sticky.

      We have good moderators but we may need to get their attention.... hmmmmm - I think we have moderators????

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      10-18-2010 10:54 PM #26
      Quote Originally Posted by groggory View Post
      Why do you have filters on both the inlet and the outlet of the pump? I assume the inlet is to protect the pump and the outlet is to protect the motor. Correct. this is per the fuel pump instructions. this was, BTW, the new-old build. the last iteration of the drag rabbit.

      Also I assume that you can put a mediocre filter on the inlet and a very good filter on the outlet. again, true. the 100 micron in is to get the big stuff.... the 10 micron out is to get the rest. and then, Methanol and Ethanol take a different filter element.

      For instance, one of the little stubby 100 micron jegs filters on the inlets and one of the huge 6 micron filters on the outlet?

      and to update ya, Integrated Engineering also offers the 044 end plates separately as well, if you are doing custom work. here is my latest fuel cell, i sunk the two 044 pumps into the fuel cell. less fittings, more space, cool the pumps, quiet them down.

      i will be putting 90 deg fittings on the inlets, so they pull from the lowest point. just progress pix....

      another little tidbit of advice. when using pumps like the 044 and the A1000, its a good idea to make a plug setup like pictured here. this way you do not strip the bolts, or unloosen them. i had this happen once to an SX fuel pump. was disappointed, too. that setup is pictured up above under the rabbit.

      and yeah, the Aeroquip socketless is a real pain in the ass to work with. i have a very expensive chunk of "tired of dealing with that stuff" on a shelf LOL.









    26. Member gtimitch's Avatar
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      10-20-2010 09:50 AM #27
      Bump for a sticky........

    27. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      10-20-2010 10:55 AM #28
      Cool. Thanks.

      Also, updated the post with more setup pics and notes.

    28. Member ejg3855's Avatar
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      10-20-2010 11:13 AM #29
      I am not sure this is right?

      I think the Bosch 044 should be between the rail and the surge tank. In this picture it would be pushing fuel into the Surge Tank.

      FPR always goes on the return side doesn't it?
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      10-20-2010 11:24 AM #30
      ya, that looks wrong to me, too.

      i've always done it FPR after rail.

    30. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      10-20-2010 11:44 AM #31
      Quote Originally Posted by newto20v View Post
      ya, that looks wrong to me, too.

      i've always done it FPR after rail.
      Good call.

      The way that drawing was done it would leave the line pre fuel rail very nicely regulated...but the fuel rail itself would have no regulation. It would be freely dumping back into the gas tank return line.

      I'll update that drawing.

      Thanks.

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      10-20-2010 11:54 AM #32
      side inlet of the FPR after the rail.
      cap the other side of the FPR.
      return to surge from bottom of FPR.

    32. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      10-20-2010 12:05 PM #33
      Quote Originally Posted by newto20v View Post
      side inlet of the FPR after the rail.
      cap the other side of the FPR.
      return to surge from bottom of FPR.
      Made the modifications.

      Thanks.

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      10-20-2010 12:09 PM #34
      look at aaron stealing all my credit

      JK.
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    34. Moderator groggory's Avatar
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      10-20-2010 12:15 PM #35
      Quote Originally Posted by ejg3855 View Post
      look at aaron stealing all my credit

      JK.
      You made the fix. He chimed in with specifics to that particular aFPR. Win Win.

      This thing has become really detailed over time. Maybe if I ever have some time I'll draft it all up into a nice PDF with properly scaled images, good typeset, and all that.

      Thanks again for all the input. I think anyone going BT should consider this a must-read at this point.

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