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    Thread: 8v Build~84 Rabbit Wolfsburg Drop top

    1. Member
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      08-16-2010 06:42 AM #36
      But depending in which engine stays in the car? When the GTI engine is ready, would it need Lambda?
      A Lambda system, O2 sensor system, fuel emission control system or whatever one likes to call it, is not “engine size or engine code” specific. Yes, different engines use different ways to do the same job, more or less, but having one or not having one is not really a matter of engine size or code. It is also not a “power killer” as some may like to believe. No, race cars do not have emission systems, but power robbing is really not the reason why. Your plan as you stated it was to restore the car, I didn’t see mention of building a race car or street racer? And even if you do want a nice little street performance car, the emission system will not hinder you in any way (in fact the system can be used to help).

      . . . . Bosch sells High Output Alternators, (150-200 AMPS!) but they do not fit this car. . . . I have also read a smaller/better pulley will help an alt to work more efficiently . . . I can machine aluminum with Carbide router bits to build a mount. . . The ones in the junkyards here are JUNK. I could find a new model, I'm sure, (90 AMPS) but what part # am I looking for?
      As you indicate above, there are 90amp alternators which fit your car and they should be enough for almost any situation, I would think. I don’t see the need to re-invent the wheel as they say or start machining custom one-off parts (for a restoration project for sure) when what you need is already there. I have also seen for sale up-grade kits for alternators, maybe there is one to increase the 90amp to some level higher, don’t know.

      I would not go so far as to claim all “junkyard” alternators are junk. I have had some real nasty looking alternators that I cleaned up, installed new brushes in and mounted that are still working perfect to this day. Unless there is a part inside bad, like a diode or break in the wiring, there is not much to go wrong with them, they just look dirty. I can get you a part number or two for a 90amp but the sticker has to be still on the alternator and readable too.

      It looks like I will be able to put one of the trigger pins onto the BBTB (where it is marked Pin), and just have to machine a holder for the micro switch. Piece of cake. cannot find one of the suggested intake manifolds. Maybe a junkyard in the city will have something . . . and I cannot just drive to the city at the moment. . . If not, a stage 3 intake manifold has a re-welded plenum and ported runners. and 89 Cabriolets are nowhere to be found in my area.
      I know and do understand that this is your project and your money, but why keep looking towards fabricating or machining things? Can the car be driven currently or are you in a rush to get it on the street? Are you really thinking restore the car or just get it back into shape to drive and look good? These throttle bodies and manifolds should be easy and cheap at places like Ebay or the sales pages here. Using factory parts makes fixing and replacing all that much easy later if need be. A "stage III" manifold, sorry if someone looses a sale, is really a waste of cash for what you are doing. What exactly does "stage III" mean too, or is it one of those common sales tricks like camshaft or ignition adds? If a stage III manifold does all that much, just how then will it work with an un-modified engine? Kind of like installing a sport cam on an engine with a tiny restricted exhaust, right?

      I am not trying to change your mind or make you think as I do. I do not want you to change your plans for your car to meet my plans or goals for my cars, past or present. What I do want to maybe do it get you to think before you jump into something. Does it fit into my plan? Will it really make things better and if so how? How can I do this more simple or do I have to make modifications or do fabricationing? Where is my money best spent? I have spent so much money and tried so many usless trick modifications over the years due to advertisments and hype talk. So please don't feel I am against you when I attempt to turn you away from the smae mistakes.

    2. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-16-2010 06:10 PM #37
      Quote Originally Posted by WaterWheels View Post
      What exactly does "stage III" mean too, or is it one of those common sales tricks like camshaft or ignition adds? If a stage III manifold does all that much, just how then will it work with an un-modified engine? Kind of like installing a sport cam on an engine with a tiny restricted exhaust, right?
      We all know the intake manifold on these cars is very restrictive. I would love to find a Fox or 89 Cabby manifold in a yard, but they have been picked clean. A stage III manifold is a part available right now to order. Scientific Rabbit has taken a manifold, ported the runners, and re-welded the plenum (the part we are likely to grind through when modifying the TB to manifold opening). This opens it right up.
      I will be putting Tri-Y headers on this, with 2 or 2.25" exhaust, I am porting/rebuilding the head.
      If I leave the intake manifold the way it is, the rest will have been done for nothing.

      I cannot explain the reasoning for wanting to do it other than "feeling" that I do not have enough air, having driven this car hard for 6 months.
      Okay, sure, maybe it has more to do with unmetered air entering the system due to vacuum or gasket leaks, but that is being addressed as well.
      These mods have been dyno tested, and others seem to agree, from what I read, and I have been researching what to do to this car for a year.
      If I eliminate any potential leak with new gaskets and seals, I will not have any unmetered air entering the system. That is what makes CIS problematic.
      The air sensor plate controls the volume of fuel being sent to the injectors. If air leaks get in, it does not raise as much, thus less fuel is delivered.
      When the large port on the TB is opened, more air can flow into the engine, lifting the sensor higher. A Big Bore TB allows more air in the combustion chamber, burning fuel more completely.

      The shock wave of the explosion in the engine sends out waves of pressure. These bounce back and forth in the exhaust manifold, and on Rabbits, this is a bit of a problem.
      Headers remove the gases in balanced length tubes, one from each cylinder, and expel them more efficiently.
      Again, this is just what I have read, and many sources say the same thing.
      I believe these 1.8 engines can do a lot more by breathing easier.
      What is supercharging or turbo? Forcing air into the engine.
      My car is NA, naturally aspirated. I just want to give it some ability to get metered air more efficiently.

      I love these old VW's, I just want to do an old car justice. And, for me to want to drive it, I need just a little bit more out of it.
      I am starting with the engine, exhaust and fuel because there is no point in ANYTHING cosmetic until it is driving properly. When it runs right, that is the time to think about new seats or whatever.
      Your technical advice has been appreciated! I welcome all opinions!
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-17-2010 at 05:56 AM.

    3. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-17-2010 05:33 AM #38
      Quote Originally Posted by WaterWheels View Post
      I didn’t see mention of building a race car or street racer? And even if you do want a nice little street performance car, the emission system will not hinder you in any way (in fact the system can be used to help).
      What exactly does "stage III" mean?
      *Stage III Intake Manifold ~ Expect more than 7 HP gains depending on other modifications.
      For hot street, boosted and racing applications, mid to high rpm gains. For best results use with modified head, cam and exhaust. 25% more flow over stock. Extensive porting with re-welded plenum.
      *Big Bore Throttle Body ~ Expect 4 - 5 HP increase.
      *G grind cam ~ Expect up to 4 - 9 HP increase.
      *Headers ~ Expect more than 10 HP increase.
      *Cylinder head ~ Expect a big grin! Ported, with new valves, sport springs, lifters, etc.

      Power output of the engine is directly proportional to the amount of air and fuel that it can ingest,
      the goal is to pack as much mixture as possible into the engine during the intake cycle.

      As the exhaust valve opens a few degrees before dead center(or at TDC for that matter), the exhaust gases exiting the combustion camber create a pressure wave. This pressure wave of exhaust gases also form a sonic pressure wave. A sonic wave travels the speed of sound. The speed of the exhaust gases travels slower and is based on the diameter or the tube and other restrictions. When the high pressure sonic wave reaches a large area change, such as a collector, muffler, or end of pipe, the wave reflects backwards and changes pressure(from positive to negative).

      So the high pressure wave exiting the head, entering the header, reaches the first pipe merge reflects back toward the head as a negative wave. Sucking additional gases from the chamber. If the valve timing(during overlap period) and wave timing is the same, then the (sucking) wave pulls air in from the intake system at several times the force than the piston does. Before the piston even has started to pull air in. When this happens the combustion chamber is filled with fresh charge, and the intake process is off to a quick start with high velocity intake charge. this has been called the 5th cycle on racing motors.

      Here are some basic calculations Scientific Rabbit did to see how long the runners on the headers needed to be to give the boost of intake charge.

      Sonic wave travels about 1130 ft/sec in hot air
      Basic cam timing is 1/2 crank rotation.(keep things simple)
      Equation ((1/2 crank rotation/rpm) x wave speed = total distance /2 = runner length
      ((30/rpm) x 1130)/2

      rpm vs. runner length
      1000 16.95 ft
      2000 8.48 ft
      3000 5.65 ft
      4000 4.24 ft
      5000 3.39 ft
      6000 2.83 ft
      6500 2.61 ft

      It seems that tuning for 6000 to 6500 rpm is reasonable. That would mean that the first collector(point where two pipes merge ie area change) would need to be about 2' long. Since the port length on the 8v motor from valve to gasket surface is about 5 inches.

      Picking the Right Muffler

      "The trend is that as flow is added to an initially flow-restricted engine, power increases rapidly at first then gains tail off. Once the available flow exceeds about 2.2 cfm per hp, the gains possible by increasing muffler capacity drop to less than 1 percent."
      "Knowing that 2.2 cfm per open-pipe hp means zero loss from back pressure allows us to determine how much muffler flow your engine needs."
      For instance, a VW 90 horsepower on open exhaust will require 90x 2.2 = 198CFM

      Exhaust Science Demystified

      Compression

      The stock JH 8 valve motor found in the Rabbit GTI, some 1.8L Rabbit Convertibles and some Scirocco's has a static compression of 8.5:1. There are various techniques to up the compression, to up the horsepower and torque. Replacing the pistons with flat top pistons or decking the head. The pistons found in the JH motor have dished pistons.

      Compression Ratio increase


      % increase of horsepower(normally with equal torque increase)

      8.0:1 to 9.0:1
      1.8% increase

      9.0:1 to 10.0:1
      1.3 % increase

      10.0:1 to 11.0:1
      1.0%

      11.0 to 12.0:1
      .8%

      12.0:1 to 13.0:1
      .6 %

      13.0:1 to 14.0:1
      .5 %
      Source "Volkswagen Performance Handbook" by- Greg Raven 1987

      Compression Ratio = (CD + PV + HV + HGV)/(PV +HV +HGV)


      Where:
      CD = Cylinder Displacement
      PV = Piston Volume
      HV = Head Volume
      HGV = Head Gasket Volume

      Cylinder Displacement = (bore x bore x stroke x .0031416) /4
      Plugging in JH values in mm:
      445.22 CC = (81 X 81 x 86.40 x .0031416 ) /4

      Values for stock JH motor:
      PV = 21 cc
      HV = 28 cc (this varies between heads, and combustion chamber on the same head 28 cc -30 cc )
      HGV = 9 cc

      Compression Ratio plugging in JH values
      (445.22 + 21 + 28 + 9)/21 + 28 + 9)
      (503.22)/58 = 8.67
      Expressed as 8.67:1

      Increasing Compression

      Decking the head - removing material from the surface to decrease the volume of the combustion chamber. Removing 0.040" of an inch reduced the volume to about 26 cc.

      Rerun calculation with revised HV values
      (445.22 + 21 + 26 + 9)/21 + 26 + 9)
      (501.22)/56 = 8.95
      Expressed as 8.95:1


      Now you see the math behind the calculations.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 03-27-2011 at 02:01 AM.

    4. Member ps2375's Avatar
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      08-17-2010 10:37 AM #39
      Don't think you can just add all those numbers up and have the "added" HP from the mods, it doesn't always work that way. The TB is a nice update and the "G" grind cam is also nice. I have both and they do help. I have had both the long and short versions of TT's downpipes and also various headers. I liked the "race" dp better of the two(made for w/o cat) and am currently running a Tri-Y header, Very nice, but if you go header, be sure to have motor mounts in proper working order and the brace from header to block to help extend the life of the header. And the biggest I would suggest for exhaust is 2.25" and a "turbo" muffler of some sort but not the Flowmaster, they are loud and harsh sounding to me and I don't think there is enough volume moving thru them to make them "work" properly.
      Tradition is the art of making the same mistake repeatedly, on purpose.

      FS:MkI low back front seat upholstery(new)

    5. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-17-2010 04:38 PM #40
      Quote Originally Posted by ps2375 View Post
      Don't think you can just add all those numbers up and have the "added" HP from the mods, it doesn't always work that way.
      Funny thing about math...

      It is great to hear about someone else using the mods I am about to attempt.
      I believe without fixing the gasket/seal/fuel issues, these are a waste of time, and HP will not be realized.

      I too was suspicious about the Flowmaster.
      Borla seems like the way to go, from what I have heard.
      A high flow catalytic converter will actually provide some required back-pressure.

      I will be using the Heavy Duty motor mounts with polyurethane inserts.
      I think this front mount on the car is worn out.

      The header brace is super important! It could rip off without it!
      Even if it does not add up exactly, it will increase throttle response.
      The Wavetrac differential is a part that will have to be obtained a couple months later, along with
      H&R coilover suspension. That should put all this horsepower to the ground, possibly increasing WHP.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-27-2010 at 05:41 AM.

    6. Member ps2375's Avatar
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      08-17-2010 04:58 PM #41
      I have the poly front mount and just added the diesel rear mount after finding that my header had started to crack. I also made a brace to the block as I could not find a stock one in the yards. I took that opportunity to weld the header and have it ceramic coated.
      Tradition is the art of making the same mistake repeatedly, on purpose.

      FS:MkI low back front seat upholstery(new)

    7. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-17-2010 07:09 PM #42
      Quote Originally Posted by WaterWheels View Post
      Your plan as you stated it was to restore the car, I didn’t see mention of building a race car or street racer?
      What I meant by restore the car I mean new fuel lines, rebuild the fuel distributor (replace with new plunger and spring and NLA o ring), new copper washers and gaskets and seals EVERYWHERE. Most of these on this car are disintegrating, or will need to be replaced as the system comes apart. Did you see the Fuel distributor to fuel filter line? Yuck!
      It in itself is 69 bucks, so it is not cheap, but peace of mind? PRICELESS
      I might as well do everything while it is apart, I will have the access.
      Just replacing the motor/trans mounts requires lots to come out. While it is apart, it would be silly not to take that opportunity to swap out a few bits!
      If I do most of the install work, leave the porting and tuning to the pros, this set up will cost me all of about $4500. Everything included. I will make a list of what I used and what I paid.
      It would cost a LOT more if I didn't look around for bargains.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-18-2010 at 06:22 PM.

    8. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-18-2010 03:41 PM #43
      Quote Originally Posted by ps2375 View Post
      If you want to have a real nice running motor, have the IM shaft balanced along with the bottom-end (including the pp and flywheel) and you'll love it.
      Where would you get work like this done? Do you mean with a lathe, to remove any wobble?
      I can't imagine you would add weights to these parts.
      I only say this because that is how they balance a wheel.

      Quote Originally Posted by ps2375 View Post
      As long as you have the TB switch for WOT, the lambda system should work, if it is functioning now. The CIS can maintain the AFR that you adjust it to at idle pretty well, ours did anyway and we completely disabled the lambda part of the sytem.
      I'm a little reluctant to ask, I should know this. But what is AFR?
      Are the little Viton o rings for the Idle adjust on the TB the same for all models?
      (Another source of potential leaking, unmetered air).
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-29-2010 at 03:50 PM.

    9. Member ps2375's Avatar
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      08-18-2010 03:55 PM #44
      Quote Originally Posted by Rabbitissimo View Post
      Where would you get work like this done? Do you mean with a lathe, to remove any wobble?
      I can't imagine you would add weights to these parts.
      Yes, on a lathe to remove the wobble.

      Quote Originally Posted by Rabbitissimo View Post
      I'm a little reluctant to admit it, But what is AFR?
      Are the little Viton o rings for the Idle adjust on the TB the same for all models?
      (Another source of potential leaking, unmetered air).
      AFR= Air/Fuel Ratio

      and I think the o-rings are the same.
      Tradition is the art of making the same mistake repeatedly, on purpose.

      FS:MkI low back front seat upholstery(new)

    10. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-19-2010 03:36 AM #45
      One other issue I have is sloppy shifting. I put a used junkyard shift linkage in the car last December, because the plastic ball joint pivot thing broke. What a terrible thing to have to do in freezing snow.
      The metal shift pivot housing is fine, I can just paint it.
      I found a new pivot kit. It was only 20 bucks!
      The kit has the spring for the shift rod, and an improved pivot. It just slides into the metal housing, with a tight rubber grip to keep it there, (just like the original).
      Lithium grease inside the pivot area will help it feel smooth. This saves about 70 dollars in parts.
      ($45 for the pivot w/ housing, $25 for the plastic and silicone bushings, and $20 for the Delrin bushing.)

      A heim-joint shift linkage is available for $140, it goes all the way to the front, made of metal w/zinc coating! (No rust). The shift rod link is weighted, helping it throw better, and never gets sloppy.
      This costs a lot more than the $17 it would cost to get the plastic interlocking stock linkage, but I use my shifter, not my brakes to slow down, and I will not trust plastic for that job. Plus, I saved 70 dollars on the other shifter parts!
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-20-2010 at 07:21 PM.

    11. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-20-2010 03:07 PM #46
      So here is a basic outline of things to check/replace in your old Rabbit.

      Start with a complete tune up (if not recently conducted):
      • Replace ignition components: spark plugs, cap, rotor, wires (use Bosch ignition parts only)
      • Replace air and fuel filters
      • Replace injector seals and idle screw O-ring
      • Tighten the injector holders; replace the injector holders if needed
      • Check for vacuum leaks using carburetor cleaner (spray around hoses, gaskets, injector O-rings); if idle goes up,
      leak found (replace faulty part — use a bit of RTV when replacing gaskets)
      • Check your K-Jetronic grounds
      • Test your Lambda sensor and replace if need be
      • Check your throttle switches and idle boost valves
      • Check your CIS system and control pressures
      • Check your distributor’s centrifugal and vacuum advance mechanisms
      • Set your timing, if need be
      “Do not try to correct engine trouble by making simple adjustments to the idle speed or the idle mixture (CO).
      Changing these settings without the proper measuring equipment will only be a hindrance when trying to locate the real fault.”

      ~I was very tempted to just adjust my idle speed to try to raise it up, but I suspect that
      when all the new gaskets and seals are installed, I would just wish it was right back where I started.

      Here is the official K-Jet troubleshooting guide for your viewing pleasure:
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-21-2010 at 04:49 AM.

    12. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-20-2010 08:55 PM #47
      So I need a part number for the intake manifold from a 89 Cabriolet. Or, Fox? I may have located one, but I need to verify it is correct before it is sent.
      Will the cold start injector be in the same spot on the cabriolet?
      I will check the auxiliary air valve as well.
      Here is where they sit in the Convertible. (Passenger side , left above engine)

      Auxiliary air valve - testing:

      1: To carry out this test, the engine coolant temperature must be below 30°C.
      2: Detach the distributor HT lead.
      3: Detach the auxiliary air valve electrical plug and ensure that the contacts in the plug connector are in good condition.
      4: Connect up a voltmeter across the contacts of the plug connectors, start the engine and run at idle speed. The voltage reading must be a minimum of 11.6 V. If a voltmeter is not available, a test lamp will suffice to check the voltage supply.
      5: With the auxiliary air valve electrical plug still detached, leave the engine running at idle speed and pinch the air inlet duct-to-auxiliary valve hose. The engine speed should drop.
      6: When the engine is warmed up to normal operating temperature, reconnect the auxiliary valve plug then pinch the hose again. This time the engine speed should remain unaltered.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-20-2010 at 09:15 PM.

    13. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-20-2010 10:11 PM #48
      Here is an overview of parts for CIS.

    14. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-22-2010 02:52 PM #49
      Lots of the info I post here is to help me with my project, having it all in one thread, instead of bouncing all over the internet trying to remember where I found critical info. Here is something I ran across months ago, but couldn't remember where I found it.

      FUEL PUMP WIRING TIP:
      Note: The following information is not documented in any of the A1 Bentley service manuals, and you may want to keep this service tip with your Bentley. The wiring diagrams do not show the following VW engineering change to the wiring of the CIS fuel pump relay.

      Back in the late 1970's, VW was having a problem with the melting/burning of Pin A8 in Socket A on the back of the fuse panel with ceramic fuses due to the high current load created by the CIS fuel pump. Pin A8 provided +12VDC via a BLACK/GREEN wire to the fuel pump and to Control Pressure Regulator and to the Auxiliary Air Regulator.

      What VW did to eliminate this design problem with the melting/burning of Pin A8 was to totally remove the internal circuit of L14 (socket L) to pin A8 (socket A) and install a remote fuel pump socket and extension harness with an auxiliary plug that plugged into socket L.

      Voltage from terminal L13 (socket L) is now routed to terminal #2 of the remote fuel pump socket via a large RED wire of the extension wiring harness.

      The voltage output to the CIS fuel pump is now provided by terminal #8 of the remote socket on a large RED/YELLOW wire to a "pigtail" connector with two RED/WHITE wires on one branch and a BLACK/GREEN wire (ie fuel pump wire) on the other branch of the pigtail connector.

      So if your A1 has the remote fuel pump relay socket on the top of the fuse panel, and you want to test the relay by installing a jumper wire to make the fuel pump run, then do the following:

      Only remove the fuel pump relay from the remote socket and keep the extension plug in the Socket L on front of the fuse panel.

      Using a good light, find terminal #2 (large red wire on back of remote socket) and terminal #8 (large red/yellow wire on back of remote socket) on the remote socket.

      Install jumper wire between terminals #2 and #8 of the remote socket. This will provide a direct +12VDC to the CIS fuel pump.

      So to bypass the fuel pump relay, just pull the relay from the remote socket and install a jumper wire between terminals #2 and #8 on the remote socket on the top of the fuse panel.

      "Thanks to VEExDUB for jogging my memory about this wiring change, and the fact it is not documented anywhere in the Bentley service procedure or wiring diagrams. Cheers, WWR."

      For lots more amazing info:
      http://reflectionsandshadows.com/a1-tech/
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-30-2010 at 02:35 AM.

    15. Member ps2375's Avatar
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      08-22-2010 03:31 PM #50
      Or to figure out how to jumper the relay, you can look at the relay, which BTW, has it's input/output circuitry printed on it, and jumper the corresponding pins at the socket. To take even more heat oyut of the fuse panel, you can put remote fuses on the heater fan, rear defroster and I run the radiator fan directly from the battery with an in-line fuse. I have had those on my car for at least 15years, if not more.
      Tradition is the art of making the same mistake repeatedly, on purpose.

      FS:MkI low back front seat upholstery(new)

    16. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-23-2010 03:10 AM #51
      Quote Originally Posted by ps2375 View Post
      Or to figure out how to jumper the relay, you can look at the relay, which BTW, has it's input/output circuitry printed on it, and jumper the corresponding pins at the socket. To take even more heat out of the fuse panel, you can put remote fuses on the heater fan, rear defroster and I run the radiator fan directly from the battery with an in-line fuse. I have had those on my car for at least 15years, if not more.
      So, do you still have a thermostat switch for the radiator fan, or is it a constant cooling off scenario?
      (Some people do that, you know...)
      I was thinking of getting a second waterproof fusebox for the engine compartment, just from a wrecker in good shape. That way, I could put some things in I would like, such as stereo components or lighting and things like that.

      I have been waiting and WAITING for the Bentley manual so I could get the proper order of the Cylinder head bolt removal, I do not want to damage (warp) that GTI head.
      It may still be over 2 weeks for it to show up... Anyone have the sequence? I just want to get the block in the hot bath!
      I searched Vortex yesterday, the only result that had the order was for a V20.
      Google didn't help much.
      I will be filming the removal of the GTI engine, and posting the Video, and/or pics.
      Should be fun! It is in a hard to access place surrounded by aging vehicles, (one of which holds the original legendary bombproof Yamaha SHO V6). This engine is one of 15,000 ever made, and was a $10,000 OPTION on a ford Taurus.

      Beautiful. Yes, the SHO is for sale, will be on Ebay in the next couple of weeks.
      There will be a towing scenario, followed by a forklift operation and ripping apart of the GTI.
      WARNING! This may get ugly....
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-31-2010 at 03:23 AM.

    17. Member ps2375's Avatar
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      08-23-2010 09:57 AM #52
      The bolt removal should be the same as the 20V. And yes, I have still have the thermoswitch in the rad to control the fan.
      Tradition is the art of making the same mistake repeatedly, on purpose.

      FS:MkI low back front seat upholstery(new)

    18. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-26-2010 05:11 AM #53
      Okay here comes the GTI from donor headquarters... Gonna be a rough ride, but no problem for a modified dodge to do the pulling ~ 700 horses 850 ft/lb or something crazy like that!
      Here is a video of this crazy truck and the treasure from below...

      Here is the other side

      So I started the teardown, bolt by bolt. Here is the proper sequence to install your cylinder head bolts.
      The cylinder head bolt removal sequence goes in reverse, to keep your head from warping.

      Here is the fuel system taken out, it is in pretty rough shape, but is repairable! The fuel lines can RIP.
      There are lots of banjo bolts and the box is a candidate for some modification.

      Here is a weird thing I didn't know was at the back of the air sensor/fuel distributor. I wonder what it is? I may need a new one.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 12-12-2010 at 02:32 AM.

    19. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-26-2010 06:02 AM #54
      Okay, just to show everyone what a big difference the throttle body secondary valve size is, here are some comparison photos. The shiny one looks like the path of least resistance, does it not?
      It looks like the primary valve is the same for both, so it only provides more air when your foot is heavy.

      Then the boot side, notice how much less metal there is to interfere with a big inhale.
      Not to mention it is way more aerodynamic.

      Bolt on HP.
      I am going right back in the morning to finish the job, strip the block bare, and get it into the hot bath.
      Yeah.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-30-2010 at 02:48 AM.

    20. Member ps2375's Avatar
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      08-26-2010 09:48 AM #55
      That valve is the frequency valve that is used by the Lambda controller to control the AFR.
      Tradition is the art of making the same mistake repeatedly, on purpose.

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    21. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-26-2010 12:20 PM #56
      Quote Originally Posted by ps2375 View Post
      That valve is the frequency valve that is used by the Lambda controller to control the AFR.
      I was wondering where the Frequency valve was hiding.
      This part is considered unobtainium, as far as I know.
      I haven't come across a single one (new) in all my searching.
      Would someone please show me the way?
      Where do you get this part?

    22. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-27-2010 04:44 AM #57
      The sun beat down on this black GTI for the teardown. Lots of wind. HOT.
      Perfect day to investigate the inner beauty of a 1983 GTI.
      248,000 Kilometers is 154,000 Miles, in case you were wondering.
      After paying close attention and taking LOTS of pictures.
      I unplugged the wiring harness.
      I will be using it to recreate new wiring to some of the major components.
      Lots of grounds on this engine go to a bolt that holds on a coolant flange on the right side of the cylinder head.
      The timing cover had to be removed, and tension released.
      The valve cover had to be unbolted to remove the timing cover.
      The cylinder head opened up to reveal a glistening marvel of engineering.
      Craftsmanship is a word that comes to mind.
      Here is a shot after vacuum, coolant, fuel and electrical were removed.

      Ahhhhh.....
      Here is a better view of what is inside.


      Now the head is about to come off.
      I remove two spring clamps that hold the exhaust manifold to the downpipe.
      I want to remove the intake and exhaust when the head is off, the bolts are pretty crusty.
      I remove the head bolts in the opposite order of installing them. They were torqued on well.
      I only get them to move slightly at first, in order.
      Then a little bit more of a turn, in order for all 10.
      Once more, in sequence for all bolts, and they come out.
      The head is off!
      Oh wait there is still one in there ... wait a sec... The head is off!
      No warp whatsoever. Nice and flat. Beautiful.
      Not only is the head off and safe, the bore is at 81, original to the day it was made.
      I don't think anyone has ever been in here since day 1.


      There is no wear, on any of them. The original crosshatch can be seen, and there are no ridges.
      You can see how high the piston travels, but it has not carved away the walls at all. That is just oil.
      It is in remarkably good shape.
      Oh I know it looks ugly, but wait till you see it come out of the hot bath!
      This is the block and transmission without the head.

      Now that I have the head out I can be more careful about removing the manifolds.
      As you can see here the exhaust is REALLY encrusted in decay.
      On the plus side, those valves measure 40 and 33, respectively. Nice.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-30-2010 at 02:57 AM.

    23. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-27-2010 05:39 AM #58
      For the intake manifold, which was less severe, I gently tapped the allan key into the bolt with a hammer, to re-establish its geometry. Once I had it seating to the bottom, I could apply the pressure it required to unbolt it without stripping something.

      The rusted out exhaust manifold bolts are a completely different story.
      They are going to have to be dealt with.

    24. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-27-2010 03:00 PM #59
      Quote Originally Posted by WaterWheels View Post
      I can get you a part number or two for a 90amp but the sticker has to be still on the alternator and readable too.
      Do you have a part number for the biggest alternator that will bolt on the GTI?
      It would be appreciated. I would like to find one new.
      Bosch has a notice about charging problems in wet weather for all alternators that fit the car.
      VW sells a shroud for the belt that prevents water splashing on it, which was the problem.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-28-2010 at 04:25 AM.

    25. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-28-2010 04:33 AM #60
      The intake manifold came off without incident, even though one bolt was close to being stripped.
      Imagine if I had tried to take off these bolts with the head still mounted.
      Not in this state of decay. No way.

      The exhaust manifold bolts are seriously rotten, and the metal is rusted right over the end.
      This is surgery, the goal is to get the head, block and tranny out safe.
      I will have to cut the ends off clean and vise-grip the bolts in order to remove them.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-28-2010 at 04:36 AM.

    26. 08-28-2010 05:18 PM #61
      Seems you have two primary options for your over all project you need to choose.
      1) get the 1.8 swapped, and keep it mostly stock except for things that are worn out and need replacing. Leave everything else stock. Get everything in good working order, then start making upgrade changes and learn what works and whats needed. This takes more time, but less money up front, and you get the point of knowing what your doing and less wasted time and money.

      2) Build the engine they way you want it now then install, work out the issues in the engine and the rest of the car. This option requires you know now what your doing or someone working every step of the way with you that does know. And costs a lot of time and $ now. Some of these never finish, and are a great source for parts for you to buy.

      Tips: It always takes longer to finish, you need more parts than expected and it costs way more than you think. Expect it and plan for it. Be realistic with your power goals, and expect that you'll always want more power than you have.

      Cheers
      ny_fam

    27. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-29-2010 01:16 AM #62
      Quote Originally Posted by ny_fam View Post
      Build the engine they way you want it now then install, work out the issues in the engine and the rest of the car. This option requires you know now what your doing or someone working every step of the way with you that does know.
      Cheers
      ny_fam
      Cheers!
      This is honestly the only car I have ever touched, mechanically speaking. I have never even changed oil on a car.
      A few years ago I didn't even know you had to put oil in a car. Yeah. That's right.

      A car roaring to life is a magic I stood in awe of. I often contemplate just how did the first one get invented? Who could have figured out how to harness an explosion? Amazing!

      I have finally caught an interest in the dirty grimy clickety clack that powers a car. No longer will I drive a car, unsure as to exactly what is going on down there in the engine bay.
      I have been reading. A lot!
      Armed with a Bentley manual, there is no telling what I might do.
      I have a pretty good understanding of the fuel system, and I am more than capable with electricity.
      Volkswagen must mean addictive, because I need more.
      I have driven many amazing cars, but this is the only one I ever wanted to work on.
      Maybe it is because it is so accessible.
      Thanks to a community interested enough to post a how to on transmission rebuilding, or how to get more out of a little car, I have been able to understand the big picture.
      Thanks to the people who look at an old beat up car and say, "It's still good."
      I have done my research, and as I pull the GTI apart, I know what almost everything does.
      When the instructions arrive, I will be unstoppable.
      It sure does help to have good people in my corner to show up with a special flywheel device and impact wrench when I am stumped about how to remove the crankshaft pulley.
      Good people who just want to hear the tires squeal! HOOO HA!
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 09-04-2010 at 02:30 AM.

    28. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-29-2010 01:24 AM #63
      So the engine mounts came out without incident, and the only real trouble was the driver side drive axle. There was one bolt underneath (8mm 12 point) that was barely accessible. I had to get the bit in as far as I could, then use a small wrench to remove it. The block, transmission and differential are free at last.


      I wasn't sure if I would have to get a new flywheel or not, but the teeth on this one are in great shape.
      I will only know as it comes apart, but I have a good feeling about this. If it is in good shape, I will balance it and use it again.


      So far the only issues have been a stripped flywheel bolt, not a problem because I have brand new German bolts.
      I even bought a few extra just in case.
      Also, the bottom cover plate had one bolt still holding on due to it having been stripped before.
      It is a circle, not a hexagon. Not a problem, an extraction bit will pull it out.
      I have been able to use the tools I use to fix my woodworking machinery, it is all metric.

      I just realized this is post #69 for me. Giggity!
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-29-2010 at 04:32 PM.

    29. Member TheMajic86GTI's Avatar
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      08-29-2010 12:27 PM #64
      Quote Originally Posted by Rabbitissimo View Post
      Yoooooo....Do urself a favor and invest in some jack stands(since ur working on the dirt put plywood under them too while ur at it so they dont sink). Or atleast put cement blocks under the car or something to prevent the car from falling on ur face!!!! Ive seen those hydraulic jacks fail many of times. Had one fall on a friends head in front of me, dont worry he's ok he has a hard head but he got extremely lucky...

    30. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-29-2010 04:22 PM #65
      Quote Originally Posted by TheMajic86GTI View Post
      Yoooooo....Do urself a favor and invest in some jack stands(since ur working on the dirt put plywood under them too while ur at it so they dont sink). Or atleast put cement blocks under the car or something to prevent the car from falling on ur face!!!! Ive seen those hydraulic jacks fail many of times. Had one fall on a friends head in front of me, dont worry he's ok he has a hard head but he got extremely lucky...
      Not to worry; I may have been a bit careless about removing this powertrain, but when ALL the parts arrive, I will be going indoors where there are jack stands, and just about anything you can imagine.
      Those lifts ARE dangerous! A little twist releases the pressure.
      So easy to accidentally drop everything, just by touching it the wrong way.
      I wasn't worried about the oil pan, a new one is coming.

      There is a big machine that flattens blocks here! An old distributor tester!
      When my Rabbit goes in, it will be done safely, and carefully.
      I am also going to strip all motor mounts, micro switch mount, and belt covers and anything else attached to the block and put them in the hot bath, then repaint them.
      I want to get any aluminum anodized, but I will see about that. Maybe, maybe not.
      There are a couple of guys that have an anodizing setup somewhere around here.
      Apparently, the color is derived from frequency!
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 08-30-2010 at 03:17 AM.

    31. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      08-31-2010 02:58 AM #66
      A very crucial NOS part has arrived today, and what a relief! I was cheap with the shipping and it took a long time. I thought maybe it wasn't coming, it almost seemed like it was too good to be true.
      But here it is!


      The engine will be stripped on the outside, and the crankshaft is coming out. More photos very soon. Hot dip coming up!
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 09-03-2010 at 05:52 AM.

    32. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      09-03-2010 03:41 AM #67
      So everything has to be removed from the block in order to clean it properly.
      Here are the likely suspects.

      A few more in the lineup...


      I am not sure if a flywheel can be resurfaced, it has a bit of light rust on the inside.
      The clutch had been replaced at some point, but the PO used a cheesy aftermarket jobby, not Sachs as Jah had intended. The pressure plate was in terrible shape, but newish.
      The flywheel is German.

      Now, with the oil pan removed, we can see the heart of the engine.

      It is recommended to use a new oil pump when rebuilding an engine, but I think I will reuse this one.
      The gears are mint, and there is a way to remove the pickup tube, and clean the filter.
      I think that would be the only issue, and as this is mechanically driven, nothing is wrong with it.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 09-03-2010 at 03:45 AM.

    33. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      09-03-2010 04:12 AM #68
      So with the oil pump removed, the pistons and connecting rods must be marked per cylinder.
      If they are to be re-used, they must go back from whence they came.
      If the block must be bored, only the connecting rods could be re-used.


      So the connecting rod nuts are removed, the rod caps carefully removed, bit by bit.
      Place them in a plastic tub with a lid to keep them together, but separate them from each other.
      It just helps to avoid damage to parts which may be re used.
      The protruding bolt is covered in order to protect the journal on the crankshaft.
      Wouldn't want to scratch that up!
      Then simply push the piston & rod away from the crank and out. Same for the other 3.

      The connecting rods were numbered, suggesting they have been balanced.
      This is yet to be confirmed.

      So with all of the connecting rods and pistons removed, the main caps must be removed.
      They were numbered by the factory, no need to worry there.
      The thrust washers were a little tricky, there were 4, VERY tight fit... Wiggle them out.


      The crankshaft is free!
      Its journals will be carefully measured, and as you can see by the drilled weights, it has already been balanced. Probably not the best way to balance a crankshaft.
      Seems like it would cause some drag, maybe I'm wrong.


      So now the tricky part, the last of the bearings are for the intermediate shaft.
      Problem is, they are not two pieces that come apart, but one solid ring.
      Cannot leave them in for the bath...
      This tool will push them out. The pink dot indicates the bearing being removed.


      So now the block is bare naked, and will have to be scrubbed clean before the bath.
      Contaminants (oil, sand, grease) must be removed as much as possible for best results.
      Here is a better look at the numbers embossed on the block.


      The GTI block, stripped naked, is getting ready for a bath.
      When it comes out, it will be ready for paint, then a fresh rebuild.

      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 01-24-2011 at 02:45 AM.

    34. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      09-03-2010 04:37 AM #69
      The exhaust manifold was holding on with a vengeance.
      It did not want to let go, so one of the bolts had to be cut off.
      Part of the manifold had to be cut out with it.
      The head is now free, and is dead flat.
      Here is a peek inside Ze German cylinder head.


      The gunk is just carbon buildup, or grease, but the inner shape is visible.
      This head will hopefully turn into a gleaming, polished beauty filled with titanium and silicon-bronze.
      New valves.... Mmmmmmm....

      Stay tuned; More to come!.....
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 09-08-2010 at 03:07 AM.

    35. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      09-08-2010 02:42 AM #70
      So today I pulled apart the dash on the GTI.
      The interior is burgundy, with red trim.
      The trim pieces all came out safely, and are in great shape!
      The wiring harness is formidable, and there are many differences between the GTI and the Rabbit Convertible.
      Many of the plugs are different.
      The VDO gauge main panel has far fewer resistors than the Convertible.

      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 03-05-2011 at 05:31 AM.

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