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    Thread: 8v Build~84 Rabbit Wolfsburg Drop top

    1. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      12-07-2010 03:59 AM #126
      So it was -6 here today, so it was a great time to powerwash the empty engine bay.
      Electrical was taped off in garbage bags, fuel lines safe.
      It sure was worth it! No grease cakes to frustrate a person, and now I can recognize shift parts.
      If the new flywheel comes tomorrow I may get the short block and tranny in!

      Speaking of tranny the Rabbit Convertible had a wrecker transmission, code FN!
      That is a normal or "tall" gear transmission.
      Spent most of the day repairing the shifter and replacing bushings. I will have no more slop!

      The yellow arrows indicate the new bushings installed in this region.
      The pink arrow points to the new relay lever, the old one had TONS of play in it.
      The blue arrows point to bolts that were so loose, I took them off by hand, no tools.

      No wonder the shifting was so sloppy. Every single link was loose.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 12-08-2010 at 03:24 AM.

    2. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      12-08-2010 03:29 AM #127
      MK1 A1 TRANSMISSION SWAP/REBUILD INFO:

      ~ Initial versions were 4 speeds, 5 speeds introduced in 1978.
      ~ Available in "normal" gearing, tall (better gas mileage), economy, close ratio GTI (better acceleration).
      ~ The close ratio trannies were found in the GTI/GLI models, but also the Wolfsburg models. Be aware of the "Self Machining" problem with these trannies. VW used rivets instead of bolts in the final drive which loosen after a while and cause expensive repairs.
      ~ Early GTI trannies have lower gearing which increases low end but looses a bit at top speed.
      (Note, higher ratio 5th gears are available).
      ~ A1 cars used 90 mm output CV flanges.
      ~ Starting 1984 1/2 Sciroccos and 1985 GTIs, all Cabrios and all 16V Sciroccos, 100mm output CV flanges are used.
      ~ The 100mm CV flanges may interfere (and lock up) with the steering knuckles of older A1 90mm cars. In some cases, the excess material can be ground away. Another solution is to replace the output flanges of the transmission to use the larger diameters. A third option is to use 100 mm inner CV joints and use it with the original 90mm axle. However, heed the following comment from Daley:

      * It is often said that all that is necessary to upgrade 100mm CVs to the earlier cars, is to swap the inner CVs to 100mm while using the 90mm axles (with 90mm outers).
      THIS IS NOT TRUE!

      The transmission in the Rabbit Convertible is code FN.
      FN code transmission: 8/81 - 7/83 Uses white speedometer gear
      020 Not close ratio. Gear 1 (3.46) 2 (1.94) 3 (1.29) 4 (0.91) 5 (0.71) Final Drive: 3.89
      Mph 5th gear @ 6500 rpm:159 ~Hub diameter:90mm ~Clutch diameter:190 or 200mm

      The transmission from the GTI is code FK.
      FK code transmission: ?
      020 Close ratio. Gear 1 (3.45) 2 (2.12) 3 (1.44) 4 (1.13) 5 (0.91) Final Drive: 3.89
      Mph 5th gear @ 6500 rpm:124 ~Hub diameter:90mm ~Clutch diameter:200mm

      http://www.mk1vw.info/
      http://www.cabby-info.com/
      http://www.brokevw.com/

      I cannot remember what size clutch I bought. I will measure it soon.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 12-26-2010 at 04:53 PM.

    3. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      12-10-2010 03:13 AM #128
      So the head still needs a bit of tweaking before it can be called complete.
      the bowl area needs to be cleaned up, it will be done soon enough.
      I consider myself very fortunate to have someone as skilled as this machinist assisting me.
      It is very unlikely I would have attempted this major project without his help.
      The head work from here on is all his efforts, and I am impressed.
      There was an amazing surprise today, something I was hoping would happen.
      This GTI head has been blessed with a 5 angle valve job.
      The valve seats have been de-shrouded, and the valves sit so perfectly in them.

      The surface of the head that meets the block is very true, but it may still be skimmed.
      The flywheel and clutch are tomorrow, and the short block and transaxle will go in as well.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 12-12-2010 at 02:52 AM.

    4. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      12-12-2010 03:18 AM #129
      The housing is all together with the new water pump, and 82 degree Wahler thermostat.
      The one that came out of the car was 80 degree, but some are 87.
      There is a burp hole with a floating plug already in this one, no need to drill one.



      The transmission had been cleaned up, (thanks!) and bushings installed.

      The rusty green end cap had to be pulled off to access some parts to be replaced.
      Throwout (release) bearing (yellow arrow), push rod go in at this end.
      The selector lever seal (blue arrow) was also new.
      I took the time to sandblast the selector lever while I had it all apart.
      The push rod seal is in the bell housing side towards the clutch, that was replaced.

      Here the yellow areas are new bushings, and the blue arrow is the new shift link.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 12-17-2010 at 02:41 AM.

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      12-12-2010 01:16 PM #130
      Quote Originally Posted by B4S View Post
      K.I.S.S.

      The main killer of projects is someone who thinks too much while trying to re-invent the wheel. Attempting to convert a TPS into two separate throttle switches is a pointless endeavor, considering you can get the TB you need from about 10 million Rabbits/Golfs/Jettas/Cabbies/Foxes/Audis/etc.

      The diagram above is for CIS-basic, no ECU.
      see part #18 (control unit)


      great build thread BTW!
      Last edited by Glegor; 12-12-2010 at 01:30 PM.

    6. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      12-16-2010 03:25 AM #131
      Thanks Glegor!
      So I had originally posted the wrong diagram, (cis basic) and after B4S had pointed it out, I changed the diagram to the one that would be used in this project.
      I wish B4S would have edited the comment, to avoid confusion. I will note that on the diagram.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 12-16-2010 at 11:25 AM.

    7. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      12-16-2010 03:40 AM #132
      No more worn out motor mounts! Say goodbye to the ugly...

      So the motor mounts have been installed in the motor mount brackets.
      The transmission side mount may be the early rabbit one.
      Its bolt hole sits the same as the OEM mount, and fits the bracket of the car frame tightly.
      It was press fit into the motor mount bracket, same size.
      The difference is the two little rubber tabs that suggest it is the early mount.
      This mount off the convertible is intact, I could use it if this one is wrong.

      The engine side mount was perfect, went in perfectly and the red bushing fits tight.
      Even with a press, it is not so easy, the pressing rings had to be a slightly smaller diameter.
      Metal had to be stacked up in order to make it happen. It has to line up perfectly.
      Not easy under pressure.

    8. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      12-16-2010 04:11 AM #133
      Grounds were often green with corrosion, broken, and the rings greasy.
      Also, there were many electrical plugs broken and jiggling around in the car.
      I took the time to rewire any broken or corroded contacts, there are lots.
      The major ones that power the cold start, WUR, aux air, frequency, and thermo time; replaced.

      Before crimping the new plugs on, put all the shrink tube loose on the wires, then connect.
      I used simple butt crimp connectors, soldered the joints, then heated the shrink tube.
      The backdrop was for clarity, to remove the engine bay backdrop.

      Ignition coil is new and lives in its new home, tucked up at the rear of the engine bay.
      The ignition coil strap was caked in rust, so it was shot and painted.
      Ground straps are upgraded to 5 gauge, with ends crimped, soldered and shrink tubed.
      Big upgrade over the old flat strap.
      The yellow arrow points to the new installed throttle cable. Blue points to new engine ground.



      Alternator al27x is meant for a newer car, but I thought it would fit.
      Its shaft is not as long as the one that was in the car. That means the pulleys will not line up.
      The thick spacer and the pulley with pink dots slide over the long shaft to make up the length.
      The yellow arrow points out the old spacer, super thick and solid, heavy.


      M type alternators (came with the car) have different plugs, and have to be upgraded.
      The wiring is a simple fix, just use bigger cable with ring ends.
      Luckily there was an old Jetta here with the correct pulley, it has a deep hole where the old shaft would be, and the short shaft of the new 90 amp bolts right on, and ends up lined up.
      There are a couple of spacers there for alignment.
      The nut bolts on the shaft where the blue line indicates, deep at the bottom of the cup.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 12-23-2010 at 10:26 PM.

    9. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      12-17-2010 02:00 AM #134
      Fuel distributor has come off the air mass meter, the plunger is in great shape.
      Three bolts on the top of the unit held it in place.
      The banjo bolts are intact, shiny bright threads, and the tops are nice and colorful.

      This roller in the large open hole is what the plunger rides on when the sensor plate rises.
      The recess around the hole is for the o-ring to seal between the distributor and air mass meter.

      The little blue line represents a pin (hard to see) that rests on the stop arm the spring clip holds.
      The spring clip, indicated by the yellow arrow, can be adjusted to keep the sensor plate.
      The sensor plate is the large flat circle in the middle of the bowl.
      It needs to sit exactly in the center of the bowl, right in the middle of the narrowest spot.
      This one has been adjusted perfectly. The pink dot is the counterbalance.
      It has a screw on the end to adjust it in or out to balance perfectly under pressure.


      Here the blue arrow points to the opening for adjusting the fuel distributor.
      This is the usually plugged hole where the tool comes through to make adjustments.
      The tool moves the screw in the mechanism the yellow arrow points to.
      It will allow the sensor plate to raise higher, or regulate how far it can rise up.
      Higher=more fuel allowed through.


      Between the black plastic trim and the aluminum body of the air mass sensor is the old gasket.
      Here they are apart and cleaned up thoroughly.

      Cleaned, all of the little bits of grease and sand no longer make the plate scrape by the bowl.
      It was hard to raise even before I blasted it, stuff gets past the filter, or past the gasket.
      It is so silky smooth and the action is without resistance now.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 12-29-2010 at 04:53 AM.

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      12-21-2010 08:11 AM #135
      Did you happen to snap pics of separating the downpipe from the exhaust manifold? Even in official manuals with VW tools, no easy way I know of. I would rather block sand the installed manifold with the head removed then mess with the spring clamps.
      I bought a new special steel ring to seal that connection and almost took it apart to fix an exhaust leak, but just in time checked out the motor mounts. A bad mount caused the engine to rotate enough for an exhaust leak at the downpipe. [Gagging icon]

    11. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      12-23-2010 09:28 PM #136
      Quote Originally Posted by MacGruber View Post
      Did you happen to snap pics of separating the downpipe from the exhaust manifold? Even in official manuals with VW tools, no easy way I know of.
      No pictures on that part, too busy figuring out how to remove those !@#&%$! spring clamps!
      It was not too bad, but then again I was not worried about putting the spring clamp back on.
      I just used my trusty prybar, it has a wedge flared up turn end, with just the right leverage.
      Tried lots of other bars before I tried the Japanese made carpentry tool.
      I came across a great tool somewhere the day after they came off.
      Ratcheting spreader tool in the vise grip family. Super easy with that tool, especially install!

    12. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      12-23-2010 09:37 PM #137
      The chaos is becoming manageable now that many of the parts are built on.
      All of the plastic airbox parts got a good soap and water bath, filthy buggers.
      The silicone seal for the air mass meter is soft, it will have to be silicone slathered.
      If it does not seal properly, the only concern is dirty air bypassing the filter.
      That was the cause of the air mass sensor stiffness.

      The clutch is going in, many thanks once again for help! 210mm clutch and flywheel, new bolts.
      Pistons 1 and 4 are TDC with the flywheel notch 0 at the top, bolted on.
      The centering tool for the driven plate is silly; it had a bit of play, it got centered anyway.

      A great write up has already been done! Find it here.
      http://www.vintagewatercooleds.com/t...tch/clutch.htm

      Engine and transaxle meet again, and were later bolted up tight.
      The back up switch/upshift plug was switched out to the original my wiring harness used.
      The pins were different, and I wanted to make sure it would work in my car.

      The engine mount and inner belt guard are installed, as well as the alternator mount.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 12-23-2010 at 10:34 PM.

    13. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      12-26-2010 03:53 PM #138
      When we got to this point, the old starter was cleaned and installed.
      A special harness was hooked up to a battery and switch, and the starter engaged.
      The idea was to ensure there were no strange noises or behavior by engaging the flywheel.
      Pistons were pumping! Everything is going to be good!
      Would have been a lot worse to build the entire car and discover a problem then.

      The cam has revealed itself, and it is looking good. The two cams were different.
      The cam from the GTI won length of lobe, and will be used.
      Euro GTI (G grind)? US spec GTI? Scirocco DZX? I do not know for sure.
      I sure hope so, anyway. I am happy either way. More power or better emissions, OK by me.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 12-27-2010 at 04:07 AM.

    14. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      12-26-2010 04:08 PM #139
      So the windshield was pushed out and revealed a big mess, not as bad as I was expecting.
      The inset top right is a closeup of the Loonie sized rust spot directly above my leak.

      After a while with the wire wheel, the rust spot proved to be pretty aggressive.
      It had eaten through the metal, and flaked off to reveal two holes.

      They were cleaned up, welded shut, ground out, and treated.


      POR (paint over rust) is a treatment suited for exactly this scenario.
      They even sell a putty like bondo, but will prevent rust from continuing its journey.
      I will sand this channel and treat it with the POR, or alternately JB weld.

      After the initial sanding, there were little spots that needed filling.

      Next remove the wiper arms and drop the wiper motor inside, remove the seals, sand.
      The hood and sides were taped off, and the area was coated in primer.

      There were a few small imperfections to fill and re prime. Lots of curing time.
      A few coats had to be applied to build a finish. Paint fumes indoors in winter is not fun.

      After lots of attention and patience I can install the windshield and get it watertight.
      I also bought a new windshield seal to get rid of the "chrome trim".
      New glass (mint used, not a scratch on it) $20 from an old junker rotting away.
      I had looked at 14 other VW cars for an in tact windshield, all the glass had chips or cracks.

      I have been addressing the wiring under the dash and have removed LOTS of stupid stuff.
      The previous owners had really gone crazy with little "improvements".
      There are led's in the vents, disco neon, led backup lights, etc..
      Here is just a sample of some of the stupid ideas people have that should never happen.

      I have taken the time to install a 6 ATC fuse block to power some of my fun stuff.
      Large wire runs through 2 proper sealed grommets in the metal and firewall, to the battery.
      The large yellow wire is the constant 12v feed from the battery.
      The green wires spread out from the yellow to power different light switches.
      One of the wires supplies constant power to the stereo for clock and music memory settings.

      Before installing, I put a rubber gasket in between the fuse block and the metal.
      There is a snap on waterproof cover for the fuse block, and will all be shrouded by a coverplate.
      Since this fuse block is supplied by a constant power, it could drain the battery if left on.
      The deck is designed to require a constant and a switched 12v, no issue there.
      It would take a really long time to drain from that.
      However, the switches are all lighted, making it harder to forget.
      There are even original tabs under the dash to hold the wire out of the way of the pedals.
      All crimped, soldered and shrink tubed. Isolated from one another.
      The best way to send the big wire through the firewall is properly.
      I took this one off the GTI wiring harness, made a small dent, drilled a hole to pilot a hole saw.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 01-09-2011 at 03:19 AM.

    15. Member Mr.loops's Avatar
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      12-29-2010 01:43 AM #140
      Well done!

    16. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      12-31-2010 03:31 AM #141
      The head has been reconditioned, all modifications complete.
      Lots of fine sludge must be washed away, including the inner channels.
      There was a frost plug on the side by the tensioner bolt, 24mm.
      This was removed, and the entire head cleansed, dried. New plug installed with aircraft sealer.
      The valvetrain has been installed with the new stem seals, after springs were checked.
      Lifters and shims in, only 3 shims needed to be replaced to be within spec.
      The insides of this GTI are cherry compared to the high mileage Convertible engine.


      There is a good write up on adjusting valve lash here...
      http://www.driversfound.com/scirocco...lveadjustment/


      The pistons were all turned to the middle, to ensure valves and pistons do not collide.
      Notice on the head the lifters of 1 and 4 are mostly up, valves seated.
      Next step was to torque the head bolts down.
      This was done in 4 stages, first (in sequence) to one torque setting, then the next.
      Then they required one half turn past that, breaker bar, done in (two) one quarter increments.


      The next logical step was to tackle the timing.
      This proved to be quite a challenge.
      The dot on the intermediate sprocket is visible in the crank pulley notch.
      Hold that while checking the dimple on cam side of the cam sprocket is level with the top plate.
      After tensioning the roller, you can manually turn the crank for a few loops of the belt.
      It should line up time and time again if you got it right, if not start again.


      WARNING! DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS YOURSELF! I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR ACTIONS!
      That little blue arrow above points to the crankshaft bolt that must be torqued to 148 ft/lbs!
      So how do you torque down a bolt to something that spins?
      The thick nylon strap broke as it tensioned the crankshaft sprocket for torquing.
      What now? You could get a steel bar and drill 5 holes in it then bolt it on with throwout bolts.
      Or, you could get some nylon rope, feed it down the spark plug hole so it lines the cylinder walls, make triple sure no other valves will possibly hit a piston, and torque away.
      Leave enough hanging out so you do not lose it inside.

      After a pause, the oil controller goes in, the injector cups installed with Locktite.

      Now the fun stuff. Intake manifold and header time. New studs and locking copper nuts.
      Stainless steel for the intake manifold.

      There needed to be a solution for header to block support, and the solution is tacked in place.
      The two bolts to the block were in the same condition, originally. The left one was cleaned.
      Those were originally the bolts for the front motor mount of the GTI!

      This was a very good solution, very strong. One of the block bolt holes needed to be tapped.
      It was welded up and trimmed, awaiting a sandblast, prime and paint. Knorrigend!

      This front motor mount was an extremely tight fit, even with the super grease supplied.
      It ended up needing to be pressed in, not easy with no good surface to push on.


      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 02-18-2011 at 05:27 PM.

    17. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      01-02-2011 02:42 AM #142
      The engine is in the car! January 1, 2011! It is going to be a great year...

      The car had been jacked up, and the engine slid underneath.
      The chain used to hoist was previously balanced to the engine and block, helps to plan ahead.
      Now the hoist is reattached to the installed chain, and the engine is pulled up into place.
      As the engine raises, the CV joints had to be moved around the header, with a twist of the chain.
      The rear transmission mount required the mounting bracket of the car to be unbolted.
      Made the job a lot easier.
      The new oxygen sensor (blue arrow) was carefully installed, it already had Never Seize on the threads.
      Never get that on the sensor or it will not operate.
      The yellow arrow is the electrical spade terminal for the sensor. Green wire going to ECU.

      The new auxiliary air valve is ready, as well as the refreshed pipes and battery clamp.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 01-03-2011 at 04:01 AM.

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      01-02-2011 10:31 AM #143
      Timing belt installing: must lock down the crank from rotating or go crazy.
      Intermediate shaft mark doesn't have to be lined up, but after distributor installed is then a good general check. I have heard of people forgetting that crank rotates twice the rate of distributor, not checking the front pulley marks and installing the distributor exactly 360 degrees off.
      Last edited by MacGruber; 01-02-2011 at 10:35 AM.

    19. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      01-03-2011 03:47 AM #144
      Quote Originally Posted by B4S View Post
      K.I.S.S.The main killer of projects is someone who thinks too much while trying to re-invent the wheel. Attempting to convert a TPS into two separate throttle switches is a pointless endeavor, considering you can get the TB you need from about 10 million Rabbits/Golfs/Jettas/Cabbies/Foxes/Audis/etc.
      This throttle body was one of very few I saw on my lengthy searches that had the correct pull.
      I did not want to re-use my trigger due to it being very worn out.
      Many use a swing bracket to correctly pull the TB valves open.
      Many I came across Pulled the other way due to the arrangement of the engine bay.
      Nice throttle bodies are not readily available in my area. An Ebay search provided little.
      Little except the one I obtained. I needed help to make it happen.
      I was very fortunate to have someone understand where I was going with it.
      A can do attitude and some skills make things work, ending up with a very nice result.
      Since the trigger pin was missing, one had to be made. UHMW is a good material for that.
      So some was taken off the bar, and turned on a lathe, then drilled for a bolt.

      The end result is wonderful. It was hooked up to a test light to fine tune the trigger at WOT.
      The o ring had to be replaced, it was hard and crushed. Viton seals. High temperature.
      The side was drilled and tapped, the bracket installed, and the height adjusted.
      The pin arm on this one is higher than the original. Notice the AFR screw is shorter, too.

      I used the stubby bolt with the notch (came with the BBTB) and put a new o ring on.

      Open wide...

      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 01-03-2011 at 03:53 AM.

    20. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      01-04-2011 03:28 AM #145
      Here is a shot underneath the car as I was going in to mount the header brace.
      The wires with the ring loops on the end are grounds for the Lambda.
      They were originally mounted to the cold start valve bolt, but I decided to mount them to an accessory bolt hole at the back of the block.
      I figured they would have a better engine ground there, it sticks far out enough to cool off.
      The female terminal is accesible from the engine bay for probing.

      The driver side inner CV joint boot had been ruptured, flinging grease everywhere.
      I dug out the snow, found the GTI, and got a good boot. The c clip was hard to remove.
      Since the boot had ruptured, there was sand and grit in the grease. It was serviced.
      Removed, cleaned, inspected and miraculously in great condition! Fresh grease, new boot.
      The header brace turned out great, and performs its function very well.
      The curve in it gives clearance for the CV joint and boot, and allows a ratchet access to the bolt.

      Soon I will hear the engine roar to life, I am eager to experience the changes that were made.
      I will play with the electrical to run the wires as neat as possible, keep them bundled.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 01-09-2011 at 02:19 PM.

    21. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      01-10-2011 09:16 PM #146
      There have been some major issues along the way with this car, some caused by me.
      Some issues were misinformation from the internet causing delays due to bad advice.
      I had to adjust the shift rod 18 times to have the gates lined up to get every gear.
      I could have ripped the car to shreds with my bare hands I was so frustrated.
      Like last night as I was replacing the cylinder head studs with shoulderless versions.
      This was done so I could enjoy the peace of mind a rubber one piece valve cover gasket allows.
      The very last stud was having trouble going in, so I chased the threads with a bolt.
      Then the bolt dropped inside the engine. It was so late I was so tired I almost puked.
      With no magnet that would fit down the tube, I left it for the night, not sure if it would be OK.
      Images of the bolt chewing the crankshaft and rods to shreds haunted my dreams.
      In the morning, I tried to fish it out of the oil pan with a wire, but I could not find it.
      I thought I would have to tear the car apart for ONE BOLT! I was close to madness...
      Then, I thought if I looked in the distributor opening I may be able to see it, and behold!
      A magnet carefully fished it out. I thought for sure it was lost deep in the oil passages.

      Well, the next thing I know I had rebuilt the fuel meter, and was ready to jump the fuel pump.
      The stupid Bentley has no clear instructions for this process, it bounced around chapters.
      I removed the power line from the alternator, and accidentally grounded it to the alt body.
      Sparks were flying and I welded a spot there with it. Not sure if I wrecked the diodes.
      It seems to be OK, I just grounded the power line. Worst case scenario I swap out the regulator.
      My confidence was deflating, I had been feeling very sure of my abilities before yesterday.

      Update: The alternator charges fine, current just grounded out through the housing to block.
      So the jumper worked, and even though I could hear the pump working, no gas up front.
      The old horrible fuel pump was encrusted in decay, I threw it away.
      Turns out it was an aftermarket Airtex pump, installed long ago, only capable 0f 20 psi.

      I know it was an Airtex pump because it had all of the same bits and pieces as this new kit.
      There was the same threaded connector coming off the back of the old one on the car.
      It even had that extra foam to make up the diameter of the pump to fit in the pump carrier.

      The Bosch unit I bought and used is much more powerful, more pressure and higher flow rate.
      The new pump went in, I had to change some of the fittings.
      This area had been patched up like the Mexico US border.
      Good and tight at the fittings, but the perimeter? Something's going to make it's way through.
      I still have to secure the mount for the fuel pump to the car, but fuel now speeds to the front.
      I bled the fuel system by removing the old injectors and placing the fuel lines into a jug.
      I removed the fuel pump relay, and used an 8 gauge wire with spade ends to jump the pump.
      With the fuel pump now operating, I lifted the airflow sensor plate with a magnet.
      No matter how careful I was, fuel got everywhere. There should be no vapor lock this way.

      The new injectors were tightened to the lines, and the new green Viton seals were slid on.
      They had been soaking in gas for a while. The injectors were then put in the cups on the head.
      What a horrible , almost impossible job it is getting the injectors with new seals in the cups.
      The distributor rotor was lined up with the mark on the distributor body, and installed.
      Spark plugs in, wires on, oil system had been primed by a hand drill with a bit on the oil pump.
      The moment was here, it will fire or it will not, there is no more time, no more help, that's it.

      IT ROARED TO LIFE!, and with no cat or exhaust on, the header was LOUD!
      It sounded like some of the hot rods that roll out of here! In true VW style, 4 banger...
      I have never experienced such an easy start from this car.
      The thing that amazes me is I could move right away without bogging. WOW.
      In the morning, the car will get further tuned to get the mix right and see how it drives then.
      This car has not started for 6 months, almost exactly. A bicycle and a borrowed car helped tons.
      I am sore, tired, greasy, smelly, cut, fumed, and the chemicals have left me raw.
      But does it ever feel good.
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 02-18-2011 at 05:34 PM.

    22. Member vwturbofox's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 31st, 2010
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      washington,everett
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      1989 vw fox gl turbo, Holset hx35w on meth:)new project 1968 bug and o 86 gti
      01-11-2011 01:48 AM #147
      so fresh and so clean

    23. Member Rabbitissimo's Avatar
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      Dec 21st, 2009
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      British Columbia
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      1984 VW Rabbit Convertible Wolfsburg Edition
      01-13-2011 03:13 AM #148
      Quote Originally Posted by vwturbofox View Post
      so fresh and so clean
      Thanks! It really turned out to be a major project.
      The best part will be taking it out into the crazy ass winter and get it filthy!
      It has had an exhaust transplant, and still needs some work, it needs a glass pack.
      I got the cheapest muffler I could find ($42) I will need to save for a quieter version.

      I also need to figure out exhaust hangers, and get some Dynamat for noise.
      Of course, there is a lot of vibration in the dash, it is old and flabby.
      It is my next project, for the spring, a custom dash. I will use Bird's Eye Maple inlay.
      I will shape the dash and stretch leather over it, like I saw them build for Ferrari on a show I saw.
      Door panels, too. Erhaben sein über!
      Last edited by Rabbitissimo; 01-21-2011 at 03:26 PM.

    24. Member
      Join Date
      Aug 20th, 2010
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      1987 Scirocco DLX
      01-15-2011 03:47 PM #149
      Congratulations!
      I thought removing those injectors with the rock hard o-rings was the hard part. I had to soak them in silicone spray and pry them out using a jam nut threaded onto the injector.

      Just 6 months - I have a used head almost ready to install I bought in 2008.

    25. Member Esevw's Avatar
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      Tacoma, WA
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      83 rabbit GTI
      01-15-2011 10:31 PM #150
      Wow that is awesome bro, I definetly know how you feel after a project like that. Ive never done a full motor restoration, but I am in the process of doing so. Check out my build thread in my sig. I just got the head about done and now its the blocks turn.

      I just basically read all 5 pages of your build and I gotta say you definetly did a super great job on this build.

      You should take some video of the motor running and post it up. That would be cool.

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