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    Thread: Adding a deadbolt to a door

    1. Senior Member
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      03-04-2011 11:34 AM #1
      I want to add a deadbolt to the exterior door that goes into our garage. Right now we just have a keyed lever (with twist lock thing on the inside) that seems pretty flimsy.

      It seems pretty straight forward to install - http://www.dummies.com/how-to/conten...bolt-lock.html

      Is there anything I need to look out for?

      For key I want my current house key to work in the deadbolt- do I just take the lock to a locksmith with my house key and they can mate them up or can they even do this at Lowes?

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      03-04-2011 01:28 PM #2
      they also sell those jigs at home depot and lowes, is makes sure your drill is square. and they aren't very expensive. Just another option.

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      03-04-2011 02:10 PM #3
      Schlage now makes locks that you can rekey yourself. However, you might need to replace your keyed lever to make it work. I think the product is called Schlage SecureKey.

      As for bringing it to a locksmith, before you even purchase the deadbolt, make sure it uses the same key blank as your existing keyed lever. If it doesn't, then you are going to need to replace the lock in the deadbolt and that will cost a lot more than the rekey charge from the locksmith.

    4. 03-04-2011 02:28 PM #4
      Depending on the brand of your existing key, home depot can rekey the new lock to match your existing key. I have the secure key locks, so the home depot people can do that in a few minutes. You can also do it yourself.

      The jig kits come with all the necessary parts to install the deadbolt. However, you will also need a chisel to make the space for the strike plate in your door jamb. Once you install your deadbolt on the door, you can put some paint or vaseline (anything goey) on the deadbolt striker. Shut your door and turn the deadbolt lock. Your material will leave a mark on the door jamb, which tells you where to drill your striker hole.

      FYI - if you plan to install the striker hole reinforcement plate with the long wood screws, pre-drill holes for the screws. The screws are made of cheap steel and they will probably snap if you try to drive them in with an electric screwdriver. Ask me how I know...

    5. Member robr2's Avatar
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      03-04-2011 05:11 PM #5
      Or call a locksmith and pay the $150 it'll cost to come out, key alike and install the deadbolt.

      The Schlage deadbolt will run about $45. If you need to buy jigs and hole saws, plan on another $50, $10 to rekey to existing key. Your up to $100+. Then you're going to spend 3 hours doing it if you've never done one before.

      The reasons there isn't a deadbolt on it are:

      It's basically an interior door - an exterior door will have to breached first - protect those doors

      It's a fire door and most likely rated only for having one hole drilled in it. Adding a second hole will defeat the fire blocking capabilities.

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      03-04-2011 05:24 PM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by robr2 View Post
      The reasons there isn't a deadbolt on it are:

      It's basically an interior door - an exterior door will have to breached first - protect those doors

      It's a fire door and most likely rated only for having one hole drilled in it. Adding a second hole will defeat the fire blocking capabilities.
      Chances of it being a true interior door (hollow core) between garage and interior house are pretty slim if the house was built within the last 40 years.

      Not sure why adding a deadbolt is going to defeat the fire protection. It isn't like he is drilling the hole and leaving it open. Surely a deadbolt will be just as fireproof as the door. We have deadbolts in all our garage doors that lead to the interior of the house. This was never questioned by the local building inspector.

    7. Member robr2's Avatar
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      03-04-2011 08:51 PM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by spockcat View Post
      Chances of it being a true interior door (hollow core) between garage and interior house are pretty slim if the house was built within the last 40 years.
      Never said it was a hollow core door but very often they are. When I said it basically it was an interior door was in terms of level of security - worry about outer perimeter first. Fire doors are designed to resist flame by UL to a standard of XX minutes of fire. According to UBC, in a residential application the door between a garage and the home must be minimum rated for 20 minutes - local codes code could require more. When UL tests the door, it is tested as the manufacturer designs it and with a UL Rated lock. If the door is designed to survive 20 minutes under those demands, adding a second hole when it's not designed for it defeats the fire rating.

      Another thiing is that the door manufacturer puts additional blocking in where the lock goes. If they only placed a block for one piece of hardware, the deadbolt may be supported only by a honeycomb and the door skins and may not stand up to an intrusion.

      Quote Originally Posted by spockcat View Post
      Not sure why adding a deadbolt is going to defeat the fire protection. It isn't like he is drilling the hole and leaving it open.
      The lock and deadbolt you buy at any home center or lumberyard will not meet specs for a fire door. Schlage offers an upgrade to their residential locks for a 3 hour rating where they change components that won't melt away.

      Quote Originally Posted by spockcat View Post
      We have deadbolts in all our garage doors that lead to the interior of the house. This was never questioned by the local building inspector.
      Was he locking at it during a construction inspection? If not, he wasn't looking for it. Heck, most inspectors don't check everything anyway or just don't care. According to UBC that door should have a closing device on it and be self latching - not many inspectors will make you do that.

      In the OP's case, I just wanted to point out that he'd be better off worrying more about the outside doors into the garage. That's were he should worry about security first.
      Last edited by robr2; 03-04-2011 at 08:58 PM.

    8. Member unimogken's Avatar
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      03-07-2011 05:13 AM #8
      I have a deadbolt on the door between the house and garage and often times I don't bother to use it because I have pretty much every tool in the garage that they could use to get thru that door!
      I really wish everyone would update their location in their profile!

      Someone buy my car already!!

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    9. Senior Member Mk1Racer's Avatar
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      03-07-2011 10:27 AM #9
      Quote Originally Posted by robr2 View Post
      Or call a locksmith and pay the $150 it'll cost to come out, key alike and install the deadbolt.

      The Schlage deadbolt will run about $45. If you need to buy jigs and hole saws, plan on another $50, $10 to rekey to existing key. Your up to $100+. Then you're going to spend 3 hours doing it if you've never done one before.

      The reasons there isn't a deadbolt on it are:

      It's basically an interior door - an exterior door will have to breached first - protect those doors

      It's a fire door and most likely rated only for having one hole drilled in it. Adding a second hole will defeat the fire blocking capabilities.
      Quote Originally Posted by robr2 View Post
      Never said it was a hollow core door but very often they are. When I said it basically it was an interior door was in terms of level of security - worry about outer perimeter first. Fire doors are designed to resist flame by UL to a standard of XX minutes of fire. According to UBC, in a residential application the door between a garage and the home must be minimum rated for 20 minutes - local codes code could require more. When UL tests the door, it is tested as the manufacturer designs it and with a UL Rated lock. If the door is designed to survive 20 minutes under those demands, adding a second hole when it's not designed for it defeats the fire rating.

      Another thiing is that the door manufacturer puts additional blocking in where the lock goes. If they only placed a block for one piece of hardware, the deadbolt may be supported only by a honeycomb and the door skins and may not stand up to an intrusion.



      The lock and deadbolt you buy at any home center or lumberyard will not meet specs for a fire door. Schlage offers an upgrade to their residential locks for a 3 hour rating where they change components that won't melt away.



      Was he locking at it during a construction inspection? If not, he wasn't looking for it. Heck, most inspectors don't check everything anyway or just don't care. According to UBC that door should have a closing device on it and be self latching - not many inspectors will make you do that.

      In the OP's case, I just wanted to point out that he'd be better off worrying more about the outside doors into the garage. That's were he should worry about security first.
      First off, you have no idea what you're talking about. I sold doors at a busy lumber yard for several years. A real lumber yard, not a Lowe's or HD.

      Pretty much any 1 3/4" solid-core door is going to have a 20-minute rating. Interior doors are typically 1 3/8" thick, although I've sold high-end 1 3/4" thick interior doors. Also typically when you get interior doors that are over 7' high, they will be 1 3/4" thick, just because an 8' door that's 1 3/8" thick will be somewhat flimsy. I have never seen an 8' hollow-core door.

      Many areas (and I believe the UBC) require a 60-minute door going from the garage to the living space. This is sometimes referred to as a B-label door. Having a B-label door, is about the entire door system, the slab, the jamb, and the hinges. They are usually 4" spring-loaded (self-closing) hinges. Hinge mortising and lock boring are done at the door vendor's facility, and they are the one that applies the B-label to the finished door unit. Further modification of the door will void the B-label rating, but drilling a second lock hole will not compromise the performance, provide that the hole is bored properly. I have never seen a true interior (1 3/8" thick) door used between the garage and the living space.

      Door manufacturers do don't build different doors to take a single bore (handle only) or a double bore (handle and dead bolt). If it's a 20-min. or a 60-min. door, it's not going to make a difference if it's got one or two lock holes bored in it. While an interior, 1 3/8", hollow-core door may only have a lock rail that's designed to support a single bore. this is not going to be an issue w/ any solid-core door. And that's primarily because hollow-core doors provide no security, and adding the additional cost of a larger lock rail makes no sense, and would only drive the cost of the door up. If someone feels that they need the security of a dead bolt on a door, they're not going to buy a hollow-core door.

      I've also never seen anything with regard to upgraded entry hardware to comply w/ the fire rating on a door (for a 20-min. or 60-min. door). Why would you need a 3-hour rating on the hardware if the door is not rated beyond 60 minutes? Any quality entry hardware set will be fine. Hell, even Kwikset crap will be ok, and that stuff is garbage. A Schlage, Baldwin, Emtek, etc. entry set will be fine.

      As far as the security of the door going from the garage to the outside (if there even is one), if it has a lite in it (any glass), more than likely, the only way that you can make it truly secure is to put a double-cylinder (key on each side) dead bolt in the door. Otherwise, the thief just breaks the window and turns the knob on the dead bolt and they're in.

      I really hate it when people like robr2 have no idea what they're talking about and spout off like they're experts. They give people bad and incorrect information.

      To the OP, as far as getting the dead bolt keyed to match the handle set key, take the key to your local Lowe's or HD (or real lumber yard / hardware store), and ask the person there to help you pick a dead bolt by the same manufacturer. Tell them that you need it keyed alike. Wait 10 min. and pay ~$10 extra, and you'll have your new dead bolt keyed to match your existing key. They most likely will cut you two new keys as part of the $10 re-keying fee. That's how we did it.

      You will need a couple of things to install the deadbolt. First will be a 2 1/8" hole saw and mandrel. Second will be a 1" hole saw or paddle bit. Third will be a 3/4" wood chisel. If you don't have an electric or cordless drill, you will need one of those as well. If you buy a Schlage lock, it will come w/ a paper template for marking where to drill the holes. One thing that you need to make sure of, is which side you put the template on. Doors have what is known as a high side and a low side. Most doors are beveled on the edges ~5 degrees. This is so that you don't have a big gap that you see from the inside, when the door is closed. You need to make sure that you put the template on the high side. Other wise, you'll drill the hole in the wrong place.

      Most modern locks allow you to adjust the backset to either 2 3/8" or 2 3/4". Most entry (not interior) doors use a 2 3/4" backset. The template you get will have marks for both the 2 3/4" and the 2 3/8" backset. Measure from the high side edge of the door to the center of your existing handle to determine the backset that your current handle is set at, and match that when you drill the hole for the new lock.

      This is not a difficult project, but it's not idiot-proof by a long shot. On a 1-5 scale, where 1 is the easiest, I'd rate this as a 2.5 - 3. If you're reasonably handy and mechanical, it shouldn't be an issue. If you're not sure which end of the hammer you use to drive the nail, maybe you want to call someone. If you call someone, you don't need to call a locksmith, any competent carpenter or handy man can do this job. Check your local newspaper for ads, or maybe the bulletin board at the grocery store. Hard to say what they'd charge, but I think $50-$75 is going to be reasonable. But w/ gas prices what they are, it could be more. Guy will have to drive there and back, and be at your house for 1/2 - 1 hour.
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    10. Member robr2's Avatar
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      03-07-2011 07:02 PM #10
      Quote Originally Posted by Mk1Racer View Post
      First off, you have no idea what you're talking about. I sold doors at a busy lumber yard for several years. A real lumber yard, not a Lowe's or HD.
      And I've sold residential and commerical door hardware at the wholesale level for the past 17 years to lumberyards, millworks and locksmiths - not HD.

      Quote Originally Posted by Mk1Racer View Post
      I have never seen a true interior (1 3/8" thick) door used between the garage and the living space.
      Again - I didn't say it was an interior door in terms of the use or construction. I simply referred to it as an "interior door" security wise. I advise the OP to be more concerned with the doors leading into the garage and home from the exterior.

      Quote Originally Posted by Mk1Racer View Post
      I've also never seen anything with regard to upgraded entry hardware to comply w/ the fire rating on a door (for a 20-min. or 60-min. door). Why would you need a 3-hour rating on the hardware if the door is not rated beyond 60 minutes?
      Fire rated doors are UL listed and to meet local codes, UL rated hardware must be used. The standard residential lock is not UL listed. Shlage offers an option for a 3 hour UL listing - why, I don't know.

      NFPA 80 in chapter 4 specifies for the use of UL rated hardware.

      Quote Originally Posted by Mk1Racer View Post
      Door manufacturers do don't build different doors to take a single bore (handle only) or a double bore (handle and dead bolt). If it's a 20-min. or a 60-min. door, it's not going to make a difference if it's got one or two lock holes bored in it.
      What I said was that if someone bored a second hole into a door UL Listed for one door - it is no longer going to be considered UL Listed. Heck, if the UL label is painted over, the listing will be void.

      Quote Originally Posted by Mk1Racer View Post
      And that's primarily because hollow-core doors provide no security, and adding the additional cost of a larger lock rail makes no sense, and would only drive the cost of the door up. If someone feels that they need the security of a dead bolt on a door, they're not going to buy a hollow-core door.
      In the OP's case, we have no idea what the existing door is. What if he has a hollow core, metal fire door? One can't easily add another bore/lock to any of those. Remember, sometimes builders do the minimum to pass code. He's not thinking future security, he's thinking cheap. When I built my addition, I had to put in a rated door in and I spent a few bucks extra for UL rated hardware. The inspector didn't care about the hardware even though it was required. I asked the lumberyard after if I could add a second bore and they said NO as it would invalidate the UL listing.

      NFPA 80 completely covers how fire doors can be modified in the field. Basically it says that it has to be done in accordance with UL listing procedures. Based on my experience with UL listings and changes, it would most likely have to done in the factory to add another bore.

      But in any case, the OP is free to do whatever he wants. It's not going to be inspected and the chance of a fire in the garage is slim.

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      03-08-2011 11:22 AM #11
      Thanks for all the posts and discussion guys.

      I'll have to take a look at the door to see what it is. As for entry points- I only have 2 ground level entries into my home, the front door and the garage door. The garage door doesn't have a lock on it- according to my LiftMaster opener it acts as a lock making it impossible to force the door open. Obviously heavy equipment could just splinter it but for a break in it's not the way to come in.

      I live in a stacked townhouse- my windows and french doors are all on the 3rd and 4th floors of the structure. Aside from my garage and front door someone would have to scale the front of the building (flat brick) or climb up onto the balcony of the neighbor below then climb up onto mine.

      Front - see the worker in the pic- our front door is in the next entry way on th right. Our windows are all on the 3rd and 4th floors.


      Back- our main "deck" on the 3rd floor (where the ladder is) andthen we also have the small balcony on the 4th floor.

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      03-08-2011 12:56 PM #12
      Off the subject, is your condo only as wide as a single car garage? That is the way it looks from the photos although the decks on the second and third floor don't seem to have dividers.

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      03-08-2011 01:45 PM #13
      The condos are as wide as 2 garages. It makes more sense when you look at the floorplans. What you are seeing is 2 units in this plan, the grayed-out portions are the space that belongs to the neighbor below me. Also, the images are flipped to show our actual layout (we're a reverse floorplan).

      1st Floor


      2nd Floor


      3rd Floor


      4th Floor

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      03-08-2011 02:58 PM #14
      So when you come home drunk late at night you can bang on the wall to his bedroom as you go up the stairs to your place and tell him you made it home safely.

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      03-08-2011 03:09 PM #15
      lol yup.

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