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    Thread: Volt Pic Post.........High VOLTage or Low? Post pictures and stories/experiences of your Volt or someone's you know or have driven.

    1. Member 2.0T_Convert's Avatar
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      10-26-2011 02:57 PM #226
      Quote Originally Posted by BumpSteer View Post
      I didn't think my comment was that off the wall

      The question was how much juice it'll pull to run AC in hot weather with different drivers and different climates

      and of course it depends. My query was more along the line of "in real world testing, how much? how much of an electrical drain variance to expect?"

      and we'll have to wait on the reports from owners. Which is the point of this thread.

      On another note, I can see the Volt being heavily window tinted to save electric power while you cool the car
      So many variables to consider.

      Ambient external temps, humidity, sunlight, etc.. even factors GM cannot control like numbers of occupants. 4 heavyset passengers who gasp for breath are going to create more work for climate system than a single young healthy female.
      Sent from my tablet while sipping weak drinks over fancy brunch with a view

    2. Senior Member Sporin's Avatar
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      10-26-2011 03:08 PM #227
      There are guys on the PriusChat forums who don't use AC or even heat to max out their mpg, but frankly it's not worth it to me to be uncomfortable in my expensive, modern car just to get and extra 3 mpg (42 instead of 45? 47 instead of 50? 50 instead of 53?)

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      10-26-2011 03:12 PM #228
      Quote Originally Posted by Sporin View Post
      There are guys on the PriusChat forums who don't use AC or even heat to max out their mpg, but frankly it's not worth it to me to be uncomfortable in my expensive, modern car just to get and extra 3 mpg (42 instead of 45? 47 instead of 50? 50 instead of 53?)
      exactly

      I've lived in Houston and I've lived in Pasadena, Cali and one of the reasons I drive a car with A/C is to stay cool (both physically and mood wise when traffic starts getting gnarly)
      “I wasn't trying to wreck him, I just wanted to rattle his cage.”... Dale Earnhardt
      Quote Originally Posted by porridgehead
      It's all about the tires. I drove my M3 in the snow. With the summer tires on, it was the safest car in the world in the snow. In fact, it was a statue. You could not make it move with half an inch of snow on the ground.

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      10-26-2011 03:12 PM #229
      Quote Originally Posted by 2.0T_Convert View Post
      So many variables to consider.

      Ambient external temps, humidity, sunlight, etc.. even factors GM cannot control like numbers of occupants. 4 heavyset passengers who gasp for breath are going to create more work for climate system than a single young healthy female.
      wow that is some visual

      youch!



      'k... of course, I'm not expecting GM to start "guesstimating" A/C's drain on the battery

      However, I was able to come up with a couple scenarios for the Nissan Leaf. And it gives an interesting look at some what ifs. Nissan did the range estimating for us

      Considering the Nissan Leaf battery range is roughly around 100 miles, this perhaps shows the percentage drop with A/C at different temps, speeds. Jury is still out of course, but these numbers sort of shape the playing field a bit.

      YMMV... used to be the motto... still is

      http://www.nissanusa.com/leaf-electr...sclaimer/index

      there are an infinite number of range scenarios*, based on many variables. here are just a few, starting with the EPA LA4 test cycle:

      EPA LA4 test cycle: 100 miles
      The Nissan LEAF has been tested under the EPA Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, a laboratory test commonly called the LA4 test cycle, which represents city driving conditions. Top speed is 56.7 mph and average speed is 19.59 mph. Ambient temperature can vary from 68 - 86 degrees. Climate control is off. The Nissan LEAF easily achieved 100 miles.


      Ideal driving conditions: 138 miles
      Speed: Constant 38 mph
      Temperature: 68 degrees
      Climate control: Off
      Driving on a flat road at a constant 38 mph means less air resistance, and therefore less energy use. And at 68 degrees, there's no need for climate control, extending the range even further. The result: a range boost up to 138 miles.

      Suburban driving on a nice day: 105 miles
      Speed: Average 24 mph
      Temperature: 72 degrees

      Climate control: Off
      The average speed in this scenario is 24 mph; common when commuting and running errands. The ambient temperature is 72 degrees and the climate control is off. Not using the air conditioner and driving at slower speeds mean less energy use and a little extra range.


      Highway driving in the summer: 70 miles
      Speed: Average 55 mph
      Temperature: 95 degrees
      Climate control: On
      Averaging 55 mph on the highway, in 95 degree weather, with the air conditioning on high may produce range figures like this. Higher speeds require more energy to overcome air resistance. Running the air conditioner means energy that could be used to increase range instead goes to cooling the car.

      Cross-town commute on a hot day: 68 miles
      Speed: Average 49 mph
      Temperature: 110 degrees
      Climate control: On
      Driving from a rural area into the city at an average 49 mph with the a/c on high may produce this range. Under these conditions, climate control combined with higher-speed driving produces increased energy consumption, hence the effect on range.

      Winter, urban stop-and-go, traffic jam: 62 miles
      Speed: Average 15 mph
      Temperature: 14 degrees
      Climate control: On
      Though the average speed is only 15 mph with stop-and-go traffic, the 14-degree temperature means the heater is doing a lot of work so you spend considerable time and energy heating your car rather than moving forward. Despite these conditions, it would still take more than 4 hours to run out of charge!
      Quote Originally Posted by Surf Green View Post
      It's not hard to tell when a driver is texting. If I can do it while driving a manual, eating a cheeseburger AND loading a shotgun... the average driver, who is admittedly much smarter, and more coordinated than me, should be capable of seeing it too.

    5. Member JtotheG's Avatar
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      10-26-2011 03:14 PM #230
      I picked up a Volt yesterday... I have it for a week.

      I had to run to Home Depot to buy a 100ft extension cord as the outlet in my garage is a piece of **** that is wired incorrectly, thus the supplied charger would only flash red and not charge. Now, I am running the cord from my house to the car... charging fine.

      In fact, I am going to take it for a spin down PCH...

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      10-26-2011 03:22 PM #231
      Quote Originally Posted by JtotheG View Post
      I picked up a Volt yesterday... I have it for a week.

      I had to run to Home Depot to buy a 100ft extension cord as the outlet in my garage is a piece of **** that is wired incorrectly, thus the supplied charger would only flash red and not charge. Now, I am running the cord from my house to the car... charging fine.

      In fact, I am going to take it for a spin down PCH...
      Damn... that sounds like a lot fun...

      Check in with a report!!!

      “I wasn't trying to wreck him, I just wanted to rattle his cage.”... Dale Earnhardt
      Quote Originally Posted by porridgehead
      It's all about the tires. I drove my M3 in the snow. With the summer tires on, it was the safest car in the world in the snow. In fact, it was a statue. You could not make it move with half an inch of snow on the ground.

    7. Member JtotheG's Avatar
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      10-26-2011 04:28 PM #232
      I will be giving the car a full review for Hooniverse.com.

      Trip down PCH was nice... grabbed Starbucks down in Newport Coast, then back home to Huntington Beach.

      I floored it leaving one of the lights, and left everything behind... and then couldn't stop laughing. Though I think I lost 2mi on the remaining battery life.

      Car is so smooth moving down the road, and stays surprisingly flat through turns.

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      10-26-2011 08:35 PM #233
      Quote Originally Posted by JtotheG View Post
      I will be giving the car a full review for Hooniverse.com.

      Trip down PCH was nice... grabbed Starbucks down in Newport Coast, then back home to Huntington Beach.

      I floored it leaving one of the lights, and left everything behind... and then couldn't stop laughing. Though I think I lost 2mi on the remaining battery life.

      Car is so smooth moving down the road, and stays surprisingly flat through turns.
      Nice..

      Nothing like full on torque at zero RPM..


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      10-26-2011 09:27 PM #234
      Looks like they are close to normal for repair if wrecked.




      Wrecked Cars.com Chevy Volt Repaired: What Did It Cost?



      As we reported in May, Cars.com's long-term Chevrolet Volt was involved in a collision that sent it to the body shop, and we just got it back. Though it cost more than the initial estimate, we were pleased to determine that the cost to repair a plug-in car wasn't as high as we had feared. In fact, it was only $2,181 more expensive than it would be to repair a 2011 Chevrolet Malibu subjected to a similar front-end "hit," according to West Loop Auto Body, which restored our Volt. It also took longer.

      After the quick $10,500 eyeballed estimate reported in our original notice about the Volt, the written account was $11,588. The final total was $14,187. Why the discrepancy? Two things: First, an error in the ordering system suggested that a parts package incorporated a few items that actually were not included. These parts then had to be ordered at added cost. Ryan Tamblyn, who managed the repairs at West Loop, said it's not uncommon for such ordering quirks to emerge for new models — or even for cars that are a few years old. Overall, he said, "It seems like GM is on top of this car and trying to make everything work right."



      The second added expense came once the Volt was reassembled and the various cooling systems re-pressurized. Coolant began to spray and an auxiliary cooling pump had to be replaced. This development was typical, Tamblyn said, because some damage can't be determined by eye until the car is reassembled. Likewise, we got a check-engine light after we took the Volt home a week ago, and it had to return to the shop for a couple of days of diagnosis and replacement of a pinched wiring harness.

      What made up close to $2,200 in costs over a best-guess estimate for a 2011 Malibu?


      Tamblyn said it came down mainly to the additional cooling systems and reprogramming. A normal car with air conditioning can have as few as two or three such systems. The Volt uses additional ones to cool the battery and electronics, so no fewer than five heat exchangers, or radiators, and associated plumbing had to be replaced. The Volt is also highly computerized, and the car goes into a safe mode after a collision that requires the engine control module to be reprogrammed. "Other hybrids don't do that," Tamblyn said.


      For what it's worth, a Malibu owner might not have gotten past the estimate phase. With a sticker price north of $40,000, our Volt was worth repairing. At a base price below $22,000, a modest Malibu might have been totaled by the insurer.

      Had the theoretical Malibu been repaired, though, Tamblyn estimates it would have taken a week to a week and a half less time. From the day of the crash, almost nine weeks passed before the Volt was ready. It seemed like forever even though we had other cars to drive. The job itself took seven weeks from the time the insurance company gave the go-ahead, though we lost three additional business days after the check-engine light came on. The ordering snafu and a defective replacement cooling pump added extra days to the process, but neither of those things were attributable to the Volt being a plug-in. In the end, Tamblyn said, his first repair of a Volt went well and he probably won't change much in estimating another, should it arrive at his shop.

    10. Senior Member AZGolf's Avatar
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      10-26-2011 10:13 PM #235
      Quote Originally Posted by Powderkeg View Post
      Looks like they are close to normal for repair if wrecked.
      That's the good news, I suppose. 9 weeks to repair though - man, I'd hate to be without a car that long and know that I have nothing to look forward to except getting back a car that's been in a major wreck already.

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      10-27-2011 01:24 AM #236
      Quote Originally Posted by Massive Attack View Post
      Nice..

      Nothing like full on torque at zero RPM..

      and at 273 foot pounds it does it's job at stop lights.......or hills

      I enjoyed that push. Not exhilarating mind you, but definitely nice to have on tap

      Quote Originally Posted by mitch hedberg
      My manager was concerned, he said "Mitch, don't use liquor as a crutch." I can't use liquor as a crutch... because a crutch helps me walk. Liquor severely screws up the way I walk.

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      10-27-2011 07:51 AM #237
      One thing that is nice about the center display is you can balance your driving style with the climate setting and see how you are affecting energy usage each step of the way.



      The center stack is also capable of providing the driver information about his or her energy usage. One display shows how the driver’s style and climate control choices affected energy use. A link to efficiency tips is provided.
      Quote Originally Posted by David Votoupal
      The car sucked in every way imaginable, that it entered the annals as one of the worst cars ever built. It was shoddily built in a plant where labour relations were atrocious. It rusted like hell, and the aluminium engine had the durability of a soggy potato chip. Few cars could have been so thoroughly bad Despite the "explosion" controversy, the Ford Pinto compared favourably to the Vega, and that's saying something.

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      10-27-2011 09:49 AM #238
      a few winterization details for the Volt

      Heated seats help reduce energy load

      Chevrolet engineers were required to introduce several innovative systems to help improve passenger comfort during the winter months. The OnStar MyLink app allows Volt owners with smartphones to start the sedan prior to their departure time, allowing the car to warm up while still plugged into the wall. This helps to preserve a full battery charge to be used during driving.


      Furthermore, by incorporating heated seats into the Chevrolet Volt’s feature list driver and passenger can be kept warm more effectively than if the sedan’s cabin air was the sole source of climate control
      . In addition, the Chevrolet Volt’s gasoline engine features a special start / stop cycle for extreme cold operation, which enables the vehicle to burn just enough fuel to heat a small amount of coolant which is then used to regulate passenger compartment temperatures. From a safety perspective, this feature also allows for more effective defrosting of the Volt’s windows and windshield.

      Increased winter comfort does come at a price, however, and during very low temperature operation the 2011 Chevrolet Volt will display the same type of battery range penalty seen in all hybrids or full electric automobiles. Not only does it take more effort for the Volt to plunge through snow and ice on the road, but the extra electrical demands of its heating system divert energy from reserves which would typically be used to move the sedan forward.
      Quote Originally Posted by alleghenyman View Post
      All of the rust, bondo, and patchwork done with old street signs gives them the crash safety of a cake decoration.

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      10-27-2011 09:58 AM #239
      I'm surprised the engine doesn't take a more active role in heating. So i take it the AC compressor is driven by the electric motor (and hopefully road as well, to use free energy)? Though I'm surprised it's not engine driven (if not in addition to the motor).
      A2Resource
      .......

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      10-27-2011 12:29 PM #240
      Quote Originally Posted by JtotheG View Post

      Car is so smooth moving down the road, and stays surprisingly flat through turns.

      This.... my brief stint in the Volt gave the same impression.

      It's no track car, obviously, but seems to be in a much better road going mood than a lot of the competition.

      This could be partially due to the battery placement amidships.

      Quote Originally Posted by cartalk
      "As near as I could tell, the car was built from compressed rust."

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      10-27-2011 01:35 PM #241
      In addition, the Chevrolet Volt’s gasoline engine features a special start / stop cycle for extreme cold operation, which enables the vehicle to burn just enough fuel to heat a small amount of coolant which is then used to regulate passenger compartment temperatures. From a safety perspective, this feature also allows for more effective defrosting of the Volt’s windows and windshield.
      Sounds like things like defrost were designed in well. Makes sense to use a heat engine to make a little heat rather than electricity.

      Quote Originally Posted by wantacad View Post
      hey now, unbolting the rear bumper, dropping the beam and gas tank to change out an exhaust hanger is perfectly normal.

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      10-27-2011 04:20 PM #242
      Quote Originally Posted by Powderkeg View Post


      Solar charging station in Michigan.
      Looks like a good snow canopy as well. I'm sure the Michigan drivers will appreciate that.


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      10-27-2011 06:41 PM #243
      Cargo cover... looks cheap

      But fulfills the engineering dictates of light weight

      “Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.”
      John Wayne

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      10-27-2011 09:22 PM #244
      What the Volt does nicely

      Driving the Volt is easy: Step on the brake, push the POWER button, shift into Drive and off you go. Flooring the accelerator brings the smooth, steady stream of power that only pure electric cars can deliver -- a feeling not unlike a jet plane accelerating down the runway. 0-60 takes around 8.5 seconds, but passing and merging acceleration is better than that number suggests.
      http://cars.about.com/od/chevrolet/f...Test-Drive.htm


      I like the red


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      10-27-2011 11:11 PM #245
      relaying a post



      On Thursday, December 24th, I took delivery of my Chevrolet Volt. I opted for Cyber Gray Metallic with black leather and dark accents. Shortly after my delivery, I drove approximately 400 miles to northern New Hampshire to visit with family for Christmas. While I intend to write some future posts about my delivery experience and subsequent long trips (including a soon-to-come 375 mile trip to Central NY), I wanted to take a moment to write this review about the Volt’s performance in snow.
      As I arrived to visit my family, I was greeted with about 2-3 inches of loose snow pack on all the roads. I was a little worried that I may be sliding around with the Volt’s low rolling resistance tires. As I started to drive around in the snow-filled streets, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the Volt behaved more like a tank than a compact hatchback.
      This particular town in New Hampshire has a fair amount of hills as well, and despite the snow and hills, the car seemed to accelerate effortlessly in anything I threw at it. I could get the traction control light to blink if I floored the car, but that was expected. Otherwise, I was able to accelerate as quickly as I wanted, and the car handled the conditions effortlessly. It was amazing. I have not had any experience in freshly fallen snow just yet, but so far I am very impressed. My previous vehicle, a Honda Civic, would’ve spun a fair amount in these conditions even with snow tires, and the same is true for my relative’s SUV and pick-up truck.
      I also had my father and uncle both test drive the Volt within the past day or two. My uncle, who at first expected some sort of golf cart in the garage, commented, “it’s like a real car” after driving it. (Of course it is! Here’s a good example of how we can all help to dispel the electric car myths and show people what the Volt is really capable of.) When trying the vehicle on snowy hills and trying to accelerate faster than he expected the car to be able to handle, the Volt continued to perform effortlessly, and he then commented, “it’s as if there’s no snow at all”.
      Needless to say, both my father and uncle were impressed with the Volt’s handling and ride quality, especially in the snow. I was consdering getting snow tires, but at this point I’m content in using the all-season tires and the Volt’s stunning traction abilities.
      I’ve also posted a video below showing the Volt negotiating up a steep grade, stopping, and then resuming up a hill. The hills don’t look as steep in the video as they really are, but hopefully it helps get the points across.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bg-Yzjge3E
      Quote Originally Posted by Barry2952
      I dragged her back to see the $4,500 Pacer. She hated it, but we bought it. She went home and cried. (when we sold it) my wife put an ad in the newspaper. A woman came out to look at the car. She said, "I really didn't go out looking for a Pacer." My wife replied, "Lady, nobody goes out looking for a Pacer. It's eighteen hundred bucks, take it or leave it!" The woman took it and drove away smiling. My wife cried.

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      10-28-2011 07:01 AM #246
      Yuma, Arizona (Volt owner's blog)

      one arizonan commented:

      Our 2011 went through many 115+ days here. The ECO setting was enough if started from the garage but after a hot soak in a parking lot COMFORT mode was definitely required. The black roof is a detriment in AZ and I have been considering having it painted Diamond White.
      (pre-production car shown in photo during shakedown testing at GM's test facility)

      Quote Originally Posted by mitch hedberg
      I drive a rental car, I don't know what's going on with it, right? So a lot of times I'll drive for like 10 miles with the emergency brake on. That doesn't say a lot for me, but it really doesn't say a lot for the emergency brake.
      Quote Originally Posted by Robstr View Post
      How hard is that to understand without getting your panties in a bunch?
      Surely some of you guys managed to make it out of middle school.

    22. Senior Member AZGolf's Avatar
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      10-28-2011 10:17 AM #247
      Yep, it gets hot here in the summer. I have to take my Prius out of Eco mode if left in a parking lot for a couple hours in the middle of a hot summer day. (The Prius reduces A/C output in Eco mode) Not surprising that it's the same story with the Volt. Good news is that the A/C is much more effective on my '10 Prius than it was on my '97 Civic or my '01 S2000. Actually my S2000 had the worst A/C of any car I've owned. Probably because it's a convertible and they figure you're more likely to only use the car in good weather to begin with.

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      10-29-2011 03:19 PM #248
      weekend bump

      Quote Originally Posted by Blackohio
      Built in boost gauge in the dash. One of my friends at the time saw that turbo was on theoretical empty and asked if we needed to stop and get more turbo. I gave it gas and he was like wait, its full now. Had to quickly explain the process.
      Quote Originally Posted by Calcvictim View Post
      so basically the OP has no clue about anything and just posts out of his ass?

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      10-29-2011 07:52 PM #249
      bound to happen sooner or later.

      Here is a post from someone who made the charge last longer



      Of course this is using the "I70 test Cycle", so may only apply in Colorado. Remember, YMMV (Your milage may vary), and with a Volt in the mountains, it may vary a lot!.

      Returning from our weekend trip, I set a new personal best: 75miles on a single charge. There was no midday recharging, no mountain mode games and no hyper-milage tricks or slow-poking it. Most of the 75 miles was highway speeds including occasionally passing other cars/trucks. That's part of what I love about the Volt.. I can drive normally and still get outstanding performance. (Well driving the speed limit may not always be normal for me, My last car would often drive above the limit, if it was able. The Volt's digital cruise control lets me keep to it :-)


      The trip started at Keystone CO, with 48m estimated range and at about 9000' elevation. We climbed up the Loveland pass to 11,990 ft. Our speed was mostly 45 until we passed A-Basin (5miles), when it gets twisty and we slowed to 35 and dropped to 25 for 2-3 really sharp hairpins). We reached the summit after about 9miles travel with 10m/2bars showing. The uphill climb really eats the juice, 75% charge used in just 9 miles.


      http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread....-single-charge





      Route Data http://Route Data http://maps.google...1,2,3&t=h&z=10

      a little bit more detail

      Next came the fun part, down the twisty road on the other side. Using cruise control set at 35, I enjoyed how the Volt limited its own speed producing lots of regen with out a lot of mental/foot games. My wife was pulling out the manual to see if this was allowed behavior, using cruise-control rather than breaks for the whole down hill. After 6 miles of down hill the Volt was showing 17m/4bars when we joined in to I70 (15miles traveled). I put it in cruise control to limit myself to the legal speed and just drove with traffic. The Volt was showing 30m/5bars when we hit Georgetown (27miles traveled). When we reached c470 after 65miles traveled it was still showing 13miles, 3 bars. There were a few bunching with slow downs at Georgetown and idaho springs, where trucks can only do 45mph, but we covered 65 miles in 70min from when we started, including the stop at Loveland for pics, so our average mph was pretty close to the legal limit of 65. We took an hour hike and lunch break at the Dino-lots where 70/c470 meet. When we continued the trip, the Volt showed 15m/3 bars (sitting made it higher??). Then traveled on C470 at 65mph for about 7 miles, exited onto Santa Fe Drive and the last 3-4 miles were at 50mph. Snapped a picture before when we got off the highway (71.4miles) then and wanted my wife to a perfect shot with max range and no gas, but the countdown on miles at the end was very very fast. We went from 1 mile down to 0miles and switched into CS in a few hundred yards. My wife missed the ideal shot waiting for the camera to initialize. We were flowing with traffic I was not going to pull over just for the shot. (My wife already thinks Im a bit crazy about this Volt :-) The remaining 33 miles were on CS mode. For those that care, tires were at 38 when we started (40 after they got hot), lights on, radio on, just fans until we got back on C470 after our break, when we switched to eco @74 as it was 88 outside. Passengers + luggage were about 400lb.

      Overall for the weekend we did 303.2 miles and only burned 3.90 gallons of gas, averaging 77.45mpg in mountain travel while traveling in style, at normal highway speeds and even using A/C. Overall we did 175 CD miles and 127CS miles. CS mode milage was much lower going up, where we used the real mountain mode to keep 65+ mph uphill. Overall CS was 32, as the volt had to work for the uphill sections at both ends of the trip. I charged before we left and twice at the condo so the average CD miles per charge, over the three charges, was 58 miles per charge. (Individual EV legs were 55.6, 45.2 and 75.)

      Of course this personal best is inflated by the downhill nature of the trip return, but it is still well above my prior personal best of 53 before the trip.
      Quote Originally Posted by TheBurninator View Post
      Wheel gap is like women, the more fingers you can fit the worse off you are

    25. Member
      Join Date
      May 22nd, 2010
      Location
      West Seattle, Washington
      Posts
      1,128
      Vehicles
      1973 240 Z, early jetta TD
      10-29-2011 10:12 PM #250
      editor's notes from "kicking tires" (blog from cars.com)

      “Compared with the Cruze, I actually thought the Volt handled better and absorbed bumps and inconsistencies better, probably due to the weight. In the city, the instant acceleration is actually really helpful in traffic situations. Normally, for a small car like that, everyone expects to be able to cut it off — not the case here. I did have some serious qualms with visibility, especially since I just came out of the Cruze, which had good visibility. The big front and rear pillars blocked my view, and the rear hatch view is not great. The side-view mirrors are placed too far forward on the body in relation to the cabin, or are too small to get the greatest view.”
      Colin Bird, editor
      Quote Originally Posted by David Votoupal
      The car sucked in every way imaginable, that it entered the annals as one of the worst cars ever built. It was shoddily built in a plant where labour relations were atrocious. It rusted like hell, and the aluminium engine had the durability of a soggy potato chip. Few cars could have been so thoroughly bad Despite the "explosion" controversy, the Ford Pinto compared favourably to the Vega, and that's saying something.

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