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    Thread: Faucet Replacement

    1. Member Visheau's Avatar
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      02-12-2012 01:41 PM #1
      As I am about to undertake the replacement of my kitchen faucet in an hour or so, any sage advice? I have a faucet wrench, water lines, seals, and of course the new faucet. Any tips or tricks to not breaking anything?

    2. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-12-2012 01:54 PM #2
      Quote Originally Posted by Visheau View Post
      As I am about to undertake the replacement of my kitchen faucet in an hour or so, any sage advice? I have a faucet wrench, water lines, seals, and of course the new faucet. Any tips or tricks to not breaking anything?
      Yes, shut off the water to the whole house and don't mess with the individual valves. Hold each valve with a crescent wrench before removing the compression nut, just as a precaution.

      Don't over-tighten the compression connections. Snug them up and inspect for leaks. Tighten as necessary.

      Oh yeah, remove the strainer at the water outlet before you turn the water back on. Give the new faucet a good flush before re-installing it.
      Last edited by barry2952; 02-12-2012 at 01:58 PM.
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      02-13-2012 10:33 AM #3
      just to add to what barry said.. teflon tape or pipe dope on the water line fittings.
      Last edited by Jiffycake!; 02-13-2012 at 10:37 AM.
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    4. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-13-2012 10:36 AM #4
      Quote Originally Posted by Jiffycake! View Post
      just to add to what barry said.. teflon tape on the water line fittings.
      Why? The threads on compression fittings are not supposed to be taped, only tapered pipe threads. They do not seal, just the compression ring. Putting tape on the compression fitting threads would defeat the purpose.
      Last edited by barry2952; 02-13-2012 at 10:39 AM.
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      02-13-2012 10:41 AM #5
      What is the purpose of shutting off the water to the whole house? I've replaced numerous faucets in my homes and never had to do that.

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      02-13-2012 10:45 AM #6
      That's true that you only really need it on pipe fittings, but I found it is a good second insurance and helps when you have to disassemble. Ever have a garden hose stuck on the spigot? If there was teflon tape or pipe dope there it would come off a lot easier. I mean what is the harm in using it?
      Last edited by Jiffycake!; 02-13-2012 at 10:48 AM.
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    7. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-13-2012 10:46 AM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by Papa Dras View Post
      What is the purpose of shutting off the water to the whole house? I've replaced numerous faucets in my homes and never had to do that.
      In my experience the mass-produced shut-off can easily break. It's just easier not to mess with them if you have access to a whole-house shut-off.
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    8. 02-13-2012 10:49 AM #8
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      In my experience the mass-produced shut-off can easily break. It's just easier not to mess with them if you have access to a whole-house shut-off.
      Also, older shut offs have a tendency to leak some. I just shut the whole house down. Only takes a second.

    9. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-13-2012 10:51 AM #9
      Quote Originally Posted by Jiffycake! View Post
      That's true that you only really need it on pipe fittings, but I found it is a good second insurance and helps when you have to disassemble. Ever have a house stuck on the spigot? If there was teflon tape or pipe dope there it would come off a lot easier. I mean what is the harm in using it?
      I kinda see your point, but the threads on a compression fitting are supposed to be able to fully tighten to compress the brass or plastic ring. They really can't do that if there is teflon taking up the space in the threads.

      I wouldn't recommend that. I don't believe I've ever seen a plumber do that, but I could be wrong.
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      02-14-2012 10:02 PM #10
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      I kinda see your point, but the threads on a compression fitting are supposed to be able to fully tighten to compress the brass or plastic ring. They really can't do that if there is teflon taking up the space in the threads.

      I wouldn't recommend that. I don't believe I've ever seen a plumber do that, but I could be wrong.
      I have seen a plumber do that. The way he explained it was that it helps you get the joint tighter by reducing friction on the threads. Done it many times myself too with good results.

    11. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-15-2012 07:48 AM #11
      Learned something new today.
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      02-15-2012 10:09 AM #12
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      In my experience the mass-produced shut-off can easily break. It's just easier not to mess with them if you have access to a whole-house shut-off.

      It is true that these often break or leak, that is all the more reason I want to use them to shut off the water, if they do leak, NOW is the time to replace them. If they dont work then there is no value in them being there.

    13. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-15-2012 10:13 AM #13
      I would agree. I don't see much value in them being there. In most cases they are strictly a convenience.

      In your opinion it would be better to break a valve and cause a flood rather than shut of the main as a precaution? I think that's screwy.
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    14. Member GeoffD's Avatar
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      02-15-2012 10:34 AM #14
      After my flood in my summer house last winter, I now have a quick water shutoff to the house that's beyond the feed to the boiler. If I'm gone for more than a day or two, I shut the water off. I've always done that as a matter of course in my Vermont place.

    15. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-15-2012 10:52 AM #15
      That's actually very clever. My boilers won't fire under 12# of pressure, so I have no heat during repairs. That seems like such a simple fix. Thanks.
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    16. Member trbochrg's Avatar
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      02-15-2012 12:53 PM #16
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      That's actually very clever. My boilers won't fire under 12# of pressure, so I have no heat during repairs. That seems like such a simple fix. Thanks.
      X2 something i may have to look in to. I have a combi tankless water heater and it too won't fire when it is under a certain #'s of pressure. Having the additional shut off past the boiler is a great idea.
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      02-15-2012 03:08 PM #17
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      I would agree. I don't see much value in them being there. In most cases they are strictly a convenience.

      In your opinion it would be better to break a valve and cause a flood rather than shut of the main as a precaution? I think that's screwy.
      If I am there fixing the sink and notice that it isnt working I can go ahead an replace it - I dont understand at what point you would allow the house to flood, maybe when your wife or mother trys to use the valve when you are out of town on a business trip and you were too lazy to check it?

    18. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-15-2012 03:11 PM #18
      My wife knows where the main is. No problem.
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    19. 02-15-2012 07:20 PM #19
      Quote Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
      If I'm gone for more than a day or two, I shut the water off.
      I do the same. Takes 2 seconds and it on the way out of the garage. Free insurance.

    20. Member Visheau's Avatar
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      02-18-2012 01:13 AM #20
      I got this job done a few hours after posting. The only glitch I had was that the included water line was too short so I had to grab an extension piece.

      Once I figured out how everything was supposed to go together it was pretty easy. Thanks for the help, Barry

    21. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-18-2012 07:29 AM #21
      My pleasure.
      Garmin Is My Pilot.

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    22. Senior Member Big Dac With Fries's Avatar
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      03-02-2012 11:02 PM #22
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      I kinda see your point, but the threads on a compression fitting are supposed to be able to fully tighten to compress the brass or plastic ring. They really can't do that if there is teflon taking up the space in the threads.

      I wouldn't recommend that. I don't believe I've ever seen a plumber do that, but I could be wrong.
      If you're putting together a compression fitting, it's a good idea to apply pipe dope to the ring and/or it's mating surface (female). The dope will give some added lubrication when compressing the ring.

      Applying any type of sealant to the threads is a waste of material - the ring does the sealing, not the threads.

      Also the fixture shut-off valves are there to be used! I turn mine on/off a couple times a year to make sure they're working. If a toilet tank cracks, and you've got to shut the water off, what's faster, shutting the toilet shutoff valve, or running downstairs and shutting the main off?
      Last edited by Big Dac With Fries; 03-02-2012 at 11:05 PM.
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    23. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-03-2012 06:46 AM #23
      Quote Originally Posted by Big Dac With Fries View Post
      Also the fixture shut-off valves are there to be used! I turn mine on/off a couple times a year to make sure they're working. If a toilet tank cracks, and you've got to shut the water off, what's faster, shutting the toilet shutoff valve, or running downstairs and shutting the main off?
      What's worse, 2 minutes of flooding in a valve break, until you get to the main, or no flooding by simply shutting off the main? I'm just saying..........

      If we took a poll, I'd say that less than 1/100 of one percent of people exercise their shut-off valves on a regular basis. You are the unusual case, I assure you. Nothing wrong with it, if that's what you want to do.
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      03-03-2012 08:39 AM #24
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      What's worse, 2 minutes of flooding in a valve break, until you get to the main, or no flooding by simply shutting off the main? I'm just saying..........

      If we took a poll, I'd say that less than 1/100 of one percent of people exercise their shut-off valves on a regular basis. You are the unusual case, I assure you. Nothing wrong with it, if that's what you want to do.
      They're designed to be used in an emergency, so why wouldn't you want to know if they work or not?

      It's the exact same principle as an emergency brake on a vehicle.

      Also, sometimes it's not practical to shut off water to the entire house.
      Want to roll your fenders or Lamin-X your lights in clear or yellow for THE ABSOLUTE CHEAPEST PRICE IN THE GTA? IM me!
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    25. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-03-2012 08:55 AM #25
      Quote Originally Posted by Big Dac With Fries View Post
      They're designed to be used in an emergency, so why wouldn't you want to know if they work or not?

      It's the exact same principle as an emergency brake on a vehicle.

      Also, sometimes it's not practical to shut off water to the entire house.
      That's fine. You're entitled to twist your shut-off as much as you'd like.
      Garmin Is My Pilot.

      I am confident you are wrong, but instead of illustrating why, I will just make disparaging remarks about your reading comprehension.
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