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    Thread: Sears Roebuck Mail-order Modern Home

    1. Member Turtleteeth's Avatar
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      02-17-2012 10:52 AM #1
      So, first off - I feel like it's been ages since I last posted on the 'tex. Sheesh... I'm getting old.

      That said, I'm very stoked about the next coming of age steps that my wife and I are about to take. First up is settlement on 3/7 for our new home!!! We are buying a 1935 Sears Roebuck Mail-order Modern Home. Check out this site for more info on what that means!!! Anyone have experience with these?

      http://www.searsarchives.com/homes/

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      02-17-2012 01:04 PM #2
      I would bet a lot of people live in them and don't even know it. What model are you getting?

    3. Geriatric Member ATL_Av8r's Avatar
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      02-17-2012 02:35 PM #3
      Quote Originally Posted by Turtleteeth View Post
      Oh sweet Jesus....there goes hours and hours of productivity at work. Thanks, a-hole




      I will assume that this means this thread will soon become home to a plethora of pictures, right?
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    4. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-17-2012 03:03 PM #4
      There were hundreds built around here.
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      02-17-2012 03:43 PM #5
      I might live in one, but don't have any evidence to back it up. My two immediate neighbors houses are almost identical in layout and appearance. How did you find out it was a Sears house?

      I got a little excited after reading the thread title though...I thought Sears was getting back into the mail order home business with modern style houses (you know, flat or low pitched roof, lots of glass, etc). That would be sweet.

    6. Senior Member FlashRedGLS1.8T's Avatar
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      02-17-2012 03:52 PM #6
      My FIL owns a S&R shot gun.

      Good luck with the S&R home.

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      02-17-2012 04:14 PM #7
      The shame is when one of these gets knocked down in the name of progress. This one was taken down in the town where I work so Stop & Shop could expand its store.


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      02-18-2012 03:47 PM #8
      Cool. We need pics when it's yours. I love Sears Houses, so completely American in style, design, and concept.

      Great book, but needs to be updated, and colorized. Also wish it went into more detail. Still its cool for before and afters:

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      02-18-2012 09:57 PM #9
      In for pics of the house, love these. I remember reading somewhere that the framing lumber had Sears (or some other identifying mark) stamped on it.

    10. Member Turtleteeth's Avatar
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      02-19-2012 02:00 PM #10
      Thanks for all the interest! In the area we are buying, there appears to have been a lot of homes built by S&R largely because a number of them were second homes for business men and people who were relocating to the area for work. The town historian is the one who told us it was a S&R home, and a bit about the history of the area. He also told us it was the first home on the street. Since going under contract, we've only been back in the house once for the home inspection. We brought our dads along with us to give them a sneak peek at things, and have them give their assessment too. One of the inspectors was an older gentleman and kept commenting on how well preserved everything was in the house. When we all walked out, each of the men said in one way or another, "they don't build em like this anymore..." That really made us feel good!

      We are working now to confirm which model it is for sure, but we are pretty confident its the Newcastle.

    11. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-20-2012 09:25 AM #11
      One of the first homes I had a hand in rewiring was a Sears home. I was 18 and a real newbie. I worked under a master that taught me about knob and tube wiring and how to replace it in an old home. At the time there was a push on to update a lot of these homes by installing a new outlets on each wall and capping off the knob and tube, leaving it only for the lighting circuits. Since there's really nothing wrong with undisturbed knob and tube the inspectors readily agreed.

      Outside walls were easy to fish as all it took was one hole from the basement up into the hollow wall cavity above. Some of the houses had Vermiculite insulation, so we always went equipped with big plastic bags to catch what literally poured out of the hole we drilled. One hole would often empty the entire wall cavity.

      Inside walls are a little trickier to fish wiring into as there are often no signs from below where the wall above is sitting. The first trade trick I was taught was to drive a nail into the floor just below where you want a new outlet. I'd drive a nail and very carefully cut an opening through the plaster and lath board. Boy that stuff can be tough to work with. The nail would locate the outside of the wall. You's simply move over 2 inches and drill into the hollow cavity above.

      I had driven a nail and cut the opening and tapped on the floor so that my boss could identify where to drill. I hear the old Hole-Hawg chewing its way through the old wood. My boss sticks a piece of Romex up through the hole and finds the way blocked so he rams the 1" drill bit up some more, turns on the drill and it gets stuck. He has to reverse the drill to get it out. I shine a flashlight into the fresh hole I had cut in the wall and he sees no light.

      He comes upstairs to have a look around and can't figure out what happened. He has me drive a second nail and goes back downstairs, only to find that he'd been drilling about two feet away from where he should be. He came back upstairs scratching his head. The proverbial light came on as he opened the bottom drawer of the dresser to find the man's dress shirts all formed into a whirlpool pattern where the drill bit had pierced the bottom drawer and spun his Sunday best into quite the mess.

      D'oh!
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      02-20-2012 09:44 AM #12
      Quote Originally Posted by Turtleteeth View Post
      We are working now to confirm which model it is for sure, but we are pretty confident its the Newcastle.
      Nice, the Newcastle looks like a great design, it's very similar to our Colonial Revival. Nice sized rooms for sure!

    13. Member Turtleteeth's Avatar
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      02-20-2012 02:33 PM #13
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      ...the drill bit had pierced the bottom drawer and spun his Sunday best into quite the mess.

      D'oh!
      Great story! And thanks for the info on what it was like working in one of these homes. We actually learned quite a lot from the home inspection about the design and build of the home. For instance... the house was built around 1935. Based on that date, we thought the house would show signs of original knob & tube wiring. But it turns out, right around the time of the build, knob and tube was beginning to get phased out in favor of cloth-covered romex. The house has been rewired with updated cable since originally installed, but still... we totally expected to see the ol' k&t!
      Now, for something we didn't expect... the house seems to have no insulation in the outer walls, which to us seemed odd and concerning. But it turns out there's a particular reason for it. The house was framed and built using a method called "balloon framing." FWIW, this means ithat the outer wall's studs run two stories from the sill of the foundation, all the way up to the roofline. That means 20ft long 2x4s! The first and second floors, and the roof are then hung from the studs, and the framing is then finished. Its a pretty interesting history lesson in house framing. As for the concern we had regarding the insulation... the inspector informed us the home could be insulated from top down and bottom up with spray insulation, but in his opinion, it seems to have been fine the way it is for the last 75-80yrs
      We agreed, and said we'll see how she breathes and make a decision on whether we want to address it or not later on down the line.

    14. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-20-2012 02:48 PM #14
      Quote Originally Posted by Turtleteeth View Post
      Great story! And thanks for the info on what it was like working in one of these homes. We actually learned quite a lot from the home inspection about the design and build of the home. For instance... the house was built around 1935. Based on that date, we thought the house would show signs of original knob & tube wiring. But it turns out, right around the time of the build, knob and tube was beginning to get phased out in favor of cloth-covered romex. The house has been rewired with updated cable since originally installed, but still... we totally expected to see the ol' k&t!
      Now, for something we didn't expect... the house seems to have no insulation in the outer walls, which to us seemed odd and concerning. But it turns out there's a particular reason for it. The house was framed and built using a method called "balloon framing." FWIW, this means ithat the outer wall's studs run two stories from the sill of the foundation, all the way up to the roofline. That means 20ft long 2x4s! The first and second floors, and the roof are then hung from the studs, and the framing is then finished. Its a pretty interesting history lesson in house framing. As for the concern we had regarding the insulation... the inspector informed us the home could be insulated from top down and bottom up with spray insulation, but in his opinion, it seems to have been fine the way it is for the last 75-80yrs
      We agreed, and said we'll see how she breathes and make a decision on whether we want to address it or not later on down the line.
      Great for access, terrible for spreading fire. I'm just sayin'..........

      It's called the "Chimney effect", I believe.
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    15. Member Turtleteeth's Avatar
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      02-20-2012 03:37 PM #15
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      Great for access, terrible for spreading fire. I'm just sayin'..........

      It's called the "Chimney effect", I believe.
      I had the same thought and concern... once we are moved in, we are going to work with a pro to confirm if there are any fire blocks. Our feeling is there are none... but we're hopeful!

    16. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-20-2012 05:39 PM #16
      Where are you? I'm just wondering if you need insulation.
      Garmin Is My Pilot.

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      02-20-2012 06:07 PM #17
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      Where are you? I'm just wondering if you need insulation.
      I can't think of many parts of the US that wouldn't need insulation, be it from the cold or heat.

    18. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-20-2012 06:21 PM #18
      Quote Originally Posted by spockcat View Post
      I can't think of many parts of the US that wouldn't need insulation, be it from the cold or heat.
      There is a temperate zone that doesn't require much. It's all in the math. I agree 100% on attics, but dead air space in walls works in some places.
      Garmin Is My Pilot.

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    19. 02-20-2012 07:30 PM #19
      These houses are very cool inmo nothing beats an old house. I hope you enjoy it.

      As the owner of a balloon framed 1910 colonial i will tell you what i tell my buddies: If your bored - buy an old house you'll never be bored again hahahaha

      Get some pics up when you close.

      Also on the insulation issue - depending on where you live there may be little to no payoff on retrofitting the wall cavities. Do some research before you do it.

      Does it still have the original siding / windows?

    20. Member Turtleteeth's Avatar
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      02-20-2012 09:53 PM #20
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      Where are you? I'm just wondering if you need insulation.
      Dirty Jerzy... About 10 mins West of Atlantic City

      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      There is a temperate zone that doesn't require much. It's all in the math. I agree 100% on attics, but dead air space in walls works in some places.
      Yeah? I'm not sure of the math, but my feeling is if the original owners were there for over 60yrs, and they didn't feel the need to insulate it, that should say something about the place. Right?

      Quote Originally Posted by NYCgolf View Post
      These houses are very cool inmo nothing beats an old house. I hope you enjoy it.

      As the owner of a balloon framed 1910 colonial i will tell you what i tell my buddies: If your bored - buy an old house you'll never be bored again hahahaha

      Get some pics up when you close.

      Also on the insulation issue - depending on where you live there may be little to no payoff on retrofitting the wall cavities. Do some research before you do it.

      Does it still have the original siding / windows?
      I am excited to get into the home and start building the list of projects. I'm also amped to get some pics taken and post em for you guys/gals. Yeah, and like I said above, we're not diving right into insulating the house or anything. The only thing we have planned so far is a new hot water heater, and installing central air in at least the upstairs, and eventually the downstairs.

    21. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-20-2012 10:02 PM #21
      No, I believe New Jersey would be in a zone where you would want to strongly considering foam, both as fire-stop and insulation. Just make damn sure you're satisfied with the number and location of outlets. You'll probably want to consider new windows as original windows will suck your pocketbook dry. If you have steam or hot water heat you'll likely want to replace the old 60% furnace or boiler.

      You have stepped into, "The Money Pit". Rent the movie.

      Seriously, everything that needs to be done to an original house is usually subsidized by your local utility. There are retrofit programs and tax credits that make a house pretty efficient without too bad a sting. I would advise that you do all these things before you move in. Living in a construction zone is one of the worst things you can do to a relationship. Ask me how I know.
      Garmin Is My Pilot.

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    22. Member Turtleteeth's Avatar
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      02-20-2012 11:14 PM #22
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      No, I believe New Jersey would be in a zone where you would want to strongly considering foam, both as fire-stop and insulation. Just make damn sure you're satisfied with the number and location of outlets. You'll probably want to consider new windows as original windows will suck your pocketbook dry. If you have steam or hot water heat you'll likely want to replace the old 60% furnace or boiler.

      You have stepped into, "The Money Pit". Rent the movie.

      Seriously, everything that needs to be done to an original house is usually subsidized by your local utility. There are retrofit programs and tax credits that make a house pretty efficient without too bad a sting. I would advise that you do all these things before you move in. Living in a construction zone is one of the worst things you can do to a relationship. Ask me how I know.
      Haha, woah, Barry... First off, great movie! Tom Hanks scene when he's stuck in the floor is my fav! Second, thanks for all the forewarning, as I greatly appreciate the concern and advice coming from you. Your Old Home build thread is EPIC! Well done, man! It's no way all gloom and doom over here. The home is in turn-key condition as it has been considerably updated over the years. In fact, someone spent some money:
      - All of the windows have been replaced with fiberglass frame double-panes.
      - The original oil tank for the hot water heat has been converted to a high-efficiency, natural gas system. I'm cannot recall the name of the actual model, but I remember seeing a fancy digital display on the front of the gas furnace, and my father-in-law who's worked in HVAC for 35yrs was amazed and said the setup will last 40-50yrs. I guess that's good, right?
      - The wiring and the box were all replaced, and all new outlets were installed to be updated according to today's standards.
      - All of the aged termite damage that had only been originally treated (sprayed) was professionally cut out and replaced and/or reinforced as necessary. (including the sill and floor joists under the front stairs, and 1/3 of the entire detached garage )

      I am SURE there will be items that pop up, but for now, we are very confident moving in as-is... minus the cost of the new hot water heater. Speaking of which, we're thinking of going with a 50 gal over the current 40.

    23. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-20-2012 11:19 PM #23
      Have you thought of point of use heaters instead of storing 50 gallons all the time?

      Sounds like your house is a find. I'm just surprised that they did all that work and didn't insulate. I was under the impression that it was an original house. There are a few left.

      Use it in good health.
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    24. Member Turtleteeth's Avatar
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      02-21-2012 12:27 AM #24
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      Have you thought of point of use heaters instead of storing 50 gallons all the time?

      Sounds like your house is a find. I'm just surprised that they did all that work and didn't insulate. I was under the impression that it was an original house. There are a few left.

      Use it in good health.
      I'll admit, I'm not familiar with the point of use heaters. Or do you mean a tankless water heater? If so, I have thought about making that type of switch, but have no experience with it. Advice?

      It is a find... or at least we feel it is. They did do considerable work. It is def not original, but its been updated with great taste and consideration for its age and character. In addition to the items mentioned above, vinyl siding has been installed in the slat style that matched the original wood siding. A sunroom has been added off the one side of the home. A 25-30 roof was installed about 6yrs ago and the attic access was relocated to make it more useable.

    25. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-21-2012 07:53 AM #25
      Yes, a tankless water heater. I'm no expert, but it makes little sense to store hot water 24 hours a day for a 5 minute shower in the morning. This is best wired or plumbed while your wall cavities are open.
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      02-21-2012 01:55 PM #26
      Start watching at 13:00.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVCfWbSs6O0

      This is a play by the same Jean Shepherd of "A Christmas Story."

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      02-27-2012 08:57 AM #27
      Sears houses are pretty neat. There's one at the end off my street. Essentially a salt box, but definitely a Sears house.
      Quote Originally Posted by MRVW00
      my GF's love to show me their t!ts....and I like to motorboat them so much they call me Chris Craft...

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      02-27-2012 12:50 PM #28
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      Yes, a tankless water heater. I'm no expert, but it makes little sense to store hot water 24 hours a day for a 5 minute shower in the morning. This is best wired or plumbed while your wall cavities are open.
      The bad thing about tankless is that when the power goes so does the hot water. When we lose power in the winter I'm so glad we have a tanked water heater.

    29. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      02-27-2012 01:05 PM #29
      Don't mean to argue, but how is that a basis for a decision to go tankless? How many powerless days did you have last year? Many draft-hood water heaters require power to operate. How soon after an area-wide power failure would it take for you to lose water pressure? It's almost instant in most areas. If you have a well with no power you couldn't use the hot water, either. So, you'd have a tank full of hot water with no means to push it to your shower.

      I think you need to rethink your objection.
      Garmin Is My Pilot.

      I am confident you are wrong, but instead of illustrating why, I will just make disparaging remarks about your reading comprehension.
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    30. 02-27-2012 01:18 PM #30
      My parents thought for the longest time that their house was a Sears, but turns out it was a Harris Brothers.



      The stone detail was done in brick on theirs, but other wise it is a dead ringer, inside and out. Nothing has been added except some aluminum framed crank out louver porch windows filling in the original porch. When the house is mine, those will be ripped out at some point. The ONLY change from original on the exterior is some 1940's asphalt shingle siding which we painted years ago. Still has the original windows and wooden storm windows. They have carpeted the house, as most of the flooring was pine, but the dining room is maple and still exposed. Original woodwork through out.

      My bed room was the 7X14 coal chute under the porch.

    31. Member Turtleteeth's Avatar
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      03-08-2012 01:52 PM #31
      Ok, we took settlement yesterday. Closing was smooth, considering the normal delays and such can make the process very stressful and frustrating.

      We had a walkthru of the home an hour prior to closing, and we fell even MORE in love with the house. It really, really fits us. We're super excited.

      The plan is to move in over this weekend, so I will snap some photos and post when I get some free time.


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      03-08-2012 02:01 PM #32
      Did I miss it or have you not told us which model S&R house your bought?

    33. Member Turtleteeth's Avatar
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      03-14-2012 12:09 PM #33
      Quote Originally Posted by spockcat View Post
      Did I miss it or have you not told us which model S&R house your bought?
      Since we got in the home, I haven't had much time to do any onsite recon, but I've been doing my homework this week online. We felt at first it might have been a modified version of the Newcastle model. But as I research online, I am beginning to think it might be another model. I haven't yet found out which though... the pics on the Sears Archives site doesn't list photos of every model they ever sold... so I'm trying to dive deeper. Any suggestions are welcome!

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      03-15-2012 08:10 PM #34
      HA!! A friend of mine was hired for a "color consultation" on a Sears Mail-Oder home (The Osborn) in Seattle... The current owners added a 2nd story to the original house:




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      03-16-2012 12:22 PM #35
      Quote Originally Posted by ZombiePunk View Post
      HA!! A friend of mine was hired for a "color consultation" on a Sears Mail-Oder home (The Osborn) in Seattle... The current owners added a 2nd story to the original house:
      Really nice work on matching up the addition to the original look.

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