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    Thread: About to bite the bullet on a 2012 TDI, got a few questions.

    1. 04-09-2012 09:59 AM #1
      I am pretty much sold on a TDI, though I would like a manual I might have to settle for DSG as there are no manual in the Atlanta area. If I were to get the 2.5 it would be in the SE trim. To my questions:

      1. Comparing the TDI to 2.5, is one more reliable than the other and is one more expensive to work on (parts and labor time)? Essentially would the fuel savings of the TDI be eaten up by repair costs, or is the TDI a tank of an engine?

      2. would you expect the same lifespan from the TDI and 2.5?

      3. some cars people would only consider owning while under factory or extended warranty, is the TDI one?

      4. if you have a lead foot and do mostly city driving what can you expect as your MPG with a TDI?

      5. Looking at a base TDI either 6spd or DSG, what is a good discount, what is an amazing discount?

    2. Member
      Join Date
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      2010 Golf Wagon TDI
      04-09-2012 10:03 AM #2
      City driving will not see you have a huge mileage increase over a 2.5.

      TDI's really shine in extended highway driving.
      dublove.ca | Unitronicchipped

    3. 04-09-2012 10:19 AM #3
      Artie,

      thanks for that. My driving is split, I do mostly city driving during the week (60mi) but on the weekends I normally drive hyw 80 miles (4x20mi). Any pointers for the other questions?

    4. Member garethusa's Avatar
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      04-09-2012 12:10 PM #4
      1. Comparing the TDI to 2.5, is one more reliable than the other and is one more expensive to work on (parts and labor time)? Essentially would the fuel savings of the TDI be eaten up by repair costs, or is the TDI a tank of an engine?

      2. would you expect the same lifespan from the TDI and 2.5?
      depends on how long you are keeping the car. the TDI engines are supposed to last over 500K+ miles if not more. if you are only keeping car for less than 10 years, you should get good lifespan outta both.

      3. some cars people would only consider owning while under factory or extended warranty, is the TDI one?
      any VW is a consideration only to keep under factory/extended warranty. unless if you are really good at maintaning on your own or know someone who does, you should be okay. parts are more $$$.


      4. if you have a lead foot and do mostly city driving what can you expect as your MPG with a TDI? i think the new TDIs get 30 city / 40 hwy. with a lead foot hwy, you may still be able to get 40-44 mpg. city mpgs may be a bit lower than 30.

      5. Looking at a base TDI either 6spd or DSG, what is a good discount, what is an amazing discount?
      avoid DSG if you can. extra maintenance that needs to be done at every 40K miles i think. eats up any savings you think you will have by going TDI.
      93 vw wolfsburg fox 4-door | 00 honda crv lx | 03 vw jetta wagon gls 2.0 | 04 vw jetta wagon gls tdi-pd | 12 vw tiguan se+panoroof+nav

    5. Member
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      Various Variants
      04-09-2012 12:11 PM #5
      Many people have asked similar questions about buying new JSWs. Please look for these because there's a lot of good info there that no one person will be willing to type out.

      Assumption: We're talking about the lifespan of the car...about two decades and over 200,000 miles, not just a three year lease window. If you're thinking short term, the answers are different.

      1. Based on engine and fuel system maintenance costs, the 2.5 should be cheaper, since it doesn't have a Turbo, a high pressure fuel pump (HPFP), nor an exhaust particulate filter. If these items have a service life, they'll need replacement. If they fail, which is a repair, the costs can be prohibitive. HPFP failures have required a complete fuel system replacement. On an older car, the HPFP repair may cost more than the car is worth.

      2. Don't know yet. Much depends on the life of the three components listed above. Previous VW diesels have a good reputation for reliability, in part because they've already proved it. The new common rail engines aren't old enough to really tell---but they are not failing in droves, either.

      3. Depends on your tolerance for risk and your willingness to spend money on sharing the risk with an insurance company. I'm hopeful my TDI lives a long life and the only insurance I plan on buying is regular maintenance. (Extended warranty = insurance.)

      4. I drive mine like I stole it and get around 30 in DC traffic.

      5. Deals are based on demand and where you are. Diesels are in short supply and in high demand. The 2.5 has less demand, so you can start looking at invoice and buy at or below that reference.

      6. What you didn't ask...

      - DSG vs manual. In the context of service life costs, the manual will be cheaper. The DSG needs maintenance every 40,000 miles. The manual doesn't need this, though manual transmission fluid isn't lifetime, either. I haven't heard of a DSG clutch change yet, but the DSG does have two clutches. They may take twice as long to wear out as the manual's single clutch. Or not... But clutches do wear out, no matter whether you shift it or whether the car shifts for you. You also have to add in the costs of acquiring the DSG.

      - Buy local or travel to get the car. If you know what you want, don't write off the idea of traveling to the car or having it shipped to you. I bought a car in OH and had it shipped to DC for about $400. That was way cheaper than getting to the car and driving it back. I've also taken a train to get to a dealer to get a car. If you know exactly what you want, there are plenty of dealers on the Vortex that have good reputations that will give you a good deal. Some ship, too.

      - CPO or New. There are some very nice deals on CPO cars that make them attractive. Two year/24K bumper-to-bumper makes the savings even better.

      - Good luck!

    6. 04-09-2012 12:40 PM #6
      great replies thanks guys. Very detailed and informative.

      From everything I have read, holding out for a manual seems the best route. Not only do I prefer manuals, the negligible increased MPG and lower maintenance costs seal the deal.

      I've also looked at CPOs but they are few and far between and not really discounted much at all. New just seems the better route.

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