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    VWVortex


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    Thread: 2003 Jetta AVH Stalling Issue

    1. 04-25-2012 11:07 PM #1
      I’m hoping you can help with some troubleshooting steps. Today I was pulling away from a light with my Jetta at normal operating temperature, and the engine stalled in the intersection. It was idling normally at 750ish RPM while I waited to make a left-hand turn, and initially accelerated through the turn with low throttle input, but at about 10 mph the engine stumbled and would not respond to additional throttle input. I watched the tach waver below 500 rpm before the motor totally quit. It wouldn’t restart in Neutral or Park, so I waited for traffic to clear and pushed the Jetta to the roadside to determine what to do. While trying to restart the engine I noted all interior electronics were functioning normally and the starter cranked as usual, but the motor wouldn’t turnover on its own.

      About three minutes after the stall, sitting on the side of the road, I cranked the motor again with the intent of recording the behavior on my phone, and this time the motor stumbled to life. It hesitated and ran rough for about 30 seconds and then purred normally, idling and responding to throttle inputs like nothing happened. I drove home (about 3 miles from the stall) with no additional problems.

      Here are the facts:
      1. Configuration: 2003 Jetta Wagon GL 2.0 (AVH engine code) with Auto transmission
      2. 127,000 miles
      3. Environment: 65 degrees, overcast, totally dry
      4. Engine temp was 190 degrees according to console gauge
      5. No codes stored and CEL never illuminated
      6. Battery tested at 12.82 volts a few miles after the stall. Alternator is putting out around 13.85 volts, depending on load, so I’m not concerned about the charging system.
      7. Interior and running lights were off, radio was on, AC was off.
      8. Fuel tank was ¼ full with 10-day old Tier 1 gasoline.
      9. The previous owner had reported something similar, but only on the highway, so I replaced the crankshaft position sensor as a precaution. Obviously I misdiagnosed the problem.
      10. Air filter is new (Wix).

      Any recommended troubleshooting steps or likely culprits?

    2. Member
      Join Date
      Mar 6th, 2002
      Location
      Morris Plains, NJ
      Posts
      6,425
      Vehicles
      1998 GTI 2.0T
      04-26-2012 09:42 AM #2
      What type of scanner are you using? Get VCDS on it and do a full auto-scan. Go from there.

      Was this a one-time thing? I take it the problem cannot be easily replicated?
      2012 Corolla
      1998 GTI 2.0T

      World Automotive
      Need any VCDS (VAG-COM) diagnostics or coding in the North NJ area? PM me.

    3. 04-26-2012 02:50 PM #3
      Thanks for replying, Anony00GT. The scanner is a Roadi RDT55 designed for VAG and OBDII. I'll need to track down a cable for VCDS Lite.

      The stall I described above was the first/only occurrence for me, but the previous owner reported that it happened in the month prior to the sale when driving on the freeway. It sounded like a classic crankshaft position sensor failure, but clearly that's not the issue here, and I'm not certain what triggered it so I can't replicate. After work I doused the coil pack with water while the engine idled, hoping to trigger a failure that would indicate a crack in the housing, but the engine purred away without a hiccup.

      Given how quick the failure was to occur and then clear, the source has got to be electrical. A cut/eroded/corroded wire, failing sensor, something along those lines. Camshaft sensor? MAF sensor? A CEL would sure help out at this point.

    4. Member
      Join Date
      Mar 6th, 2002
      Location
      Morris Plains, NJ
      Posts
      6,425
      Vehicles
      1998 GTI 2.0T
      04-26-2012 03:40 PM #4
      A bad crankshaft sensor will usually create a fault code. A bad cam sensor won't prevent the engine from running, and a bad MAF usually won't either. I suggested VCDS because I've seen many other scanners fail to pull all the codes from VAG cars, or worse, pull incorrect codes.

      It's gonna be tough without being able to reproduce the fault. I'd monitor fuel pressure while driving. A faulty fuel pump won't throw any faults.
      2012 Corolla
      1998 GTI 2.0T

      World Automotive
      Need any VCDS (VAG-COM) diagnostics or coding in the North NJ area? PM me.

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