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    Thread: Goodridge steel brake lines installed on the RS

    1. Member
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      Feb 22nd, 2006
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      Ashburn, VA
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      05-13-2012 06:24 PM #1
      I installed the Goodridge lines this morning. They went on very easily. Helps that I used a lift, but it's doable with some jack stands if you have to. Took me 3.5 hours to change the lines and bleed all 4 corners; longer than I expected. Especially on Mother's Day... The wife wasn't so happy

      The Goodridge lines are labeled for the TT RS, 2009+. Part # SAU0609-4C
      I used a Motive Power Bleeder to flush some Motul RBF600 through the lines. I used 1/2 liter per corner, so 2 liters total.

      The steps are pretty simple:

      1. Jack up the car
      2. Remove the wheel
      3. Line up new line with old to estimate placement of the retainer fittings
      4. Remove the retainer clips with a screwdriver and pliers
      5. Unscrew both ends of the brake lines and capture leaking fluid with a cloth
      6. Remove the line
      6a. On the front brakes only, remove the small bracket from the back of the caliper that doesn't really do anything. You'll know what I mean.
      7. Install new line and adjust the retainer fittings
      8. Screw down both ends of the line and tighten snugly
      8a. Reinstall retainer clips
      9. Bleed the brake with the Power Bleeder
      10. Repeat 3 times

      EDIT: One more thing. When using the Motive Power Bleeder, what everyone fails to mention is what happens at the end of the bleed. I eventually realized that the brake fluid reservior was entirely filled and was backing up the filler cap and up the line attached to it. Meaning, if I unscrewed the Power Bleeder cap to remove it, fluid would gush out everywhere and I'd have to use a turkey baster to suck out the extra fluid. The simple solution is to use the Power Bleeder to force a bit of air into the reservior. All that meant for me is that as I was done flushing 1/2 a liter through each of the calipers, I let the bleeder keep going when it ran out of fluid. This was just pushing the fluid in the reservior through the brake lines which created a void at the top. After a minute or so, the level in the reservior was suitable and I closed up the bleed port on the caliper to stop the process. I did this on the front driver's side wheel because it was the easier way to do it with one person.

      Tools to have handy:

      Protecta-sockets for the wheels
      11mm open end wrench
      Needle-nose Vise Grips
      Misc rags
      Flashlight
      Motive Power Bleeder
      Brake fluid
      Large flathead screwdriver


      So, how does it feel? Pretty good, actually. I've been taking it easy to make sure it's not going to fail. I'll get on it tomorrow. But, so far, it definitely feels better. The pedal is firmer than before. Whether that's the lines or the fluid, I have no idea. Probably a bit of both. Either way, I'm glad I did it. It's setting the stage for the Carbotechs that are in the mail.

      Some craptastic photos:








      - Jeremy -
      Last edited by - Jeremy -; 05-14-2012 at 02:09 AM.

    2. Member
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      05-14-2012 12:23 AM #2
      Were the retainer clips hard to get on and off the lines? I remember on the A5 they were a PITA to get off and almost impossible to get on the new lines.

      A tip for brake line installs - use a flare wrench. Less chance of stripping the nut.
      - Deep Black Pearl '12 GTI 2.0T DSG
      - Phantom black '12 TT-RS 2.5TQMS
      - Brilliant black '08 A5 3.2QMS
      - Volcano black '99.5 A4 1.8TQM
      - Black '89 80 manual

    3. Member
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      05-14-2012 01:02 AM #3
      Jeremy,
      am I correct to assume the 2nd pix is that of the front MagneRide damper? The lables tell an interesting story in relation to the MagneRide damper ratings...

    4. Member
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      05-14-2012 01:50 AM #4
      Quote Originally Posted by mageus View Post
      Were the retainer clips hard to get on and off the lines? I remember on the A5 they were a PITA to get off and almost impossible to get on the new lines.

      A tip for brake line installs - use a flare wrench. Less chance of stripping the nut.
      They were fairly easy to get off. I started by using the Vise Grips, but then realized that it was easier to just stick a large flathead screwdriver between the fitting and the clip and twist the screwdriver axially left and right. This "walked" the clip out of the mount and popped off after a couple of left and right turns. Getting them back on was defintiely more difficult, though. I used a metal tube that's about 1" ø and 12" long and hammered the clip back in. That was fastest and easiest for me. Guess I forgot to mention that part.

      Definitely right about the wrench. It also would've made things so much easier to get to but I just didn't have one. Either way, 11mm is the size.



      - Jeremy -
      Last edited by - Jeremy -; 05-14-2012 at 02:00 AM.

    5. Member
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      05-14-2012 01:51 AM #5
      Quote Originally Posted by 996cab View Post
      Jeremy,
      am I correct to assume the 2nd pix is that of the front MagneRide damper? The lables tell an interesting story in relation to the MagneRide damper ratings...
      I didn't even notice that... Yep, that's the front MagneRide damper. I didn't get a pic of the rear.

      - Jeremy -

    6. Member J662's Avatar
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      Vehicles
      2012 Black TT-RS • GIAC Stage 2 • AWE SP Exhaust • AWE Intercooler • 034 M Sway • 034 SS Brake Lines
      05-15-2012 02:35 AM #6
      Any update on the brake upgrade? Better feel?


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    7. Member
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      05-15-2012 04:23 AM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by J662 View Post
      Any update on the brake upgrade? Better feel?


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
      Yeah, I took the long way into the office this morning via some forest roads. The difference is subtle at normal road speeds. It's slightly firmer and requires less pressure. And it's a marked improvement at high(ish) speeds. The pedal feels less spongy and definitely requires much less pressure to brake. It feels more linear, too.

      The ultimate test will be on Thursday when I hit Hockenheimring again. Braking on turn 4 was brutal last week. We'll see how it goes this week. Then I'll get the Carbotechs on before the next track opening.

      I think this is one of those mods that's definitely not necessary, but I was so unhappy with the stock brakes on the track, I just wanted to do it all; pads, fluid, lines. They only cost $200 and they're easy to install. Kind of like a sway bar. Not very necessary on streets but much more valuable on a track. I also figured that because the Carbotechs generate a lot of heat, it would be wise to change the lines.

      - Jeremy -

    8. Member
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      05-15-2012 08:40 AM #8
      Woo! Carbotech pads just showed up in the mail. Now I need to make a little time to get them on and bed them in before Thursday.

      - Jeremy -


    9. Member
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      05-16-2012 02:01 PM #10
      Jeremy, be sure to bed them in properly. You need to keep braking to fade. This was hard to do with the XP10s on the street, and likely harder for the XP12s.

      I forgot, did you get new rotors? If not, at the least sand them with an orbital sander and garnet paper. At best, get them turned.

      I would probably bed the Bobcats first, then the XP12s. Remember, the key to bedding these brakes isn't primarily the material transfer to the disc, but heating the pad enough to vent the filler material and change the crystalline structure of the pad. If you don't do this, I guarantee fade and glazing with longer track sessions. Once that happens, you'll need to remove several mm of pad material to get rid of the glazed layer before starting all over again. Unfortunately, CTs seem to be more temperamental than other pads in this regard.

      Carbotech says XP pads can't be bedded on the street. Their procedure recommends running the car hard on a track for a few laps until fade, then rest for an hour. I think you can get 90% effect by extremely aggressive bedding on the street, and let the pads rest overnight.
      - Deep Black Pearl '12 GTI 2.0T DSG
      - Phantom black '12 TT-RS 2.5TQMS
      - Brilliant black '08 A5 3.2QMS
      - Volcano black '99.5 A4 1.8TQM
      - Black '89 80 manual

    10. Member
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      05-16-2012 02:18 PM #11
      Quote Originally Posted by mageus View Post
      Jeremy, be sure to bed them in properly. You need to keep braking to fade. This was hard to do with the XP10s on the street, and likely harder for the XP12s.

      I forgot, did you get new rotors? If not, at the least sand them with an orbital sander and garnet paper. At best, get them turned.

      I would probably bed the Bobcats first, then the XP12s. Remember, the key to bedding these brakes isn't primarily the material transfer to the disc, but heating the pad enough to vent the filler material and change the crystalline structure of the pad. If you don't do this, I guarantee fade and glazing with longer track sessions. Once that happens, you'll need to remove several mm of pad material to get rid of the glazed layer before starting all over again. Unfortunately, CTs seem to be more temperamental than other pads in this regard.

      Carbotech says XP pads can't be bedded on the street. Their procedure recommends running the car hard on a track for a few laps until fade, then rest for an hour. I think you can get 90% effect by extremely aggressive bedding on the street, and let the pads rest overnight.
      Thanks for the info. As luck would have it, I've been too busy to change out my pads. I'm going to swap them tomorrow right before going to the track. There's very little braking between here and there and it's all Autobahn so I can get some very high speed braking in on the way. I would change them at the track but I have nowhere to leave my tools, jack, etc.

      I was planning on sanding the rotors as I changed the pads so no worries there. Hockenheimring has some pretty significant braking points so I think I'll be able to get them bedded in pretty well.

      - Jeremy -

    11. Member
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      05-16-2012 05:27 PM #12
      Quote Originally Posted by - Jeremy - View Post
      Thanks for the info. As luck would have it, I've been too busy to change out my pads. I'm going to swap them tomorrow right before going to the track. There's very little braking between here and there and it's all Autobahn so I can get some very high speed braking in on the way. I would change them at the track but I have nowhere to leave my tools, jack, etc.

      I was planning on sanding the rotors as I changed the pads so no worries there. Hockenheimring has some pretty significant braking points so I think I'll be able to get them bedded in pretty well.

      - Jeremy -
      And a key point to note on Performance Friction pads - bedding them in is not neccessary...

    12. Member
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      11-15-2012 03:23 PM #13
      Jeremy,

      You forgot to mention that the right rear nut is absurdy difficult to get to! Classic German engineering - put the brake line between the suspension and the exhaust. Didn't realize I knew so much French.

      The rest of it was just like you said. Clips come off nicely, though a couple were troublesome to get back on. Fronts took 10 minutes each.

      As for pressure bleeding, don't put any fluid in the power bleeder. Top off the reservoir and just pressurize it. Yes, you have to keep an eye on the reservoir more often to top it off, but it eliminates the mess.
      - Deep Black Pearl '12 GTI 2.0T DSG
      - Phantom black '12 TT-RS 2.5TQMS
      - Brilliant black '08 A5 3.2QMS
      - Volcano black '99.5 A4 1.8TQM
      - Black '89 80 manual

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