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    Thread: Chronicles of a track TT

    1. Member All_Euro's Avatar
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      09-01-2012 02:00 PM #51
      Quote Originally Posted by Marcus_Aurelius View Post
      ...all I had to do is link him to my laptop, plug the VCDS cable and turn-on the ignition...
      This is really interesting. A big issue I've always had with the custom tunes available is being reliant of their dealers or the expensive flashing devices.

      Thanks for sharing this

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      09-01-2012 11:59 PM #52
      Quote Originally Posted by Marcus_Aurelius View Post
      Solenoids are used in water injection systems to control fluid flow on an on/off fashion. The controller is used to power a solenoid(s) to allow or stop flow to the nozzles. Ideally, you want a solenoid dedicated to each main line and placed as close to the nozzle as possible. This guarantees that no water/meth trapped in the system is sucked-in by vacuum. I use this one right before the distribution block to target the nozzles in the manifold.
      Thank you for clearing matter out , I was concerned about trapped water getting sucked by the vacuum on off-boost and so could multiple-Solenoids and having them close enough injectors eliminate such thing when installing WI setups and u just cleared that out.

      Quote Originally Posted by Marcus_Aurelius View Post
      As far as Gonzo as tuner, I feel that he is on par with the big names tunes and offers the possibility of implementing some nice features to add functionality to the tune. Personally, after chatting with him back and forth, I will say that he has perfect understanding of the complicated inner workings of the ME7 and knows the proper strategies (there are always multiple ones) to get a solid tune. As far as I can tell, he is using the right strategy to modify fueling, something that some tuners have struggled with in the past. He takes care of all the boost limits and have a sound boost control strategy. I will say that Gonzo Tuning has grown into something really good from his early days as a tuner. I would recommend him to anyone as a top contender for a "stage flash".

      After reading ur Opinion I guess some of our beloved members will go easy on Him and give him some space to grow/evolve even more.
      Reading>posting .

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      09-02-2012 12:05 AM #53
      Last edited by deltaP; 03-23-2013 at 02:21 PM.
      2004 TTQ 225 Blueflame Exhaust, APR, Modshack, Dieselgeek Shortshift

    4. 09-02-2012 01:02 AM #54
      Quote Originally Posted by deltaP View Post
      I believe the name Gonzo might cause concern. If the company were called GTP Engineering, gonzo tuning and programming, it might help---
      I think it's 'Gonzo Tuning', but why can't a guy use his name or whatever for a company. As long as the product does its job and there is good customer relations, that's what should count. It's like the Madmax stuff, if the product is sound well backed, I don't think people care about the silly name.

      The majority of people giving Gonzo a hard time in the technical section are not even potential buyers. Any new kid on the block would get a hard time there, it's just the nature of the beast. I admit, I have been hard on him a few times myself, but that's because I felt that he kind of backed off from engaging into technical dicussions/debates (I understand his position as he's not trying to get any established member ticked off, when his goal is to establish respect and set a name for his business).

      Hopefully some of the loud voices on the technical forum, would follow my example and learn to give him a genuine chance to prove his worth. I'm sure that, like me, they won't be disappointed if they can get over themselves.

    5. Member steve-o 16v GLI's Avatar
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      09-02-2012 09:21 AM #55
      Good to hear the gonzo tune is up to your standards. I really felt he got a crappy welcome to the community. Lots of trash talkers but everyone who actually used his tunes seemed happy. I was debating doin his tune since he's not that far away and def an awesome price for what you get.
      It's his right to go off on whoever he wants. Etiquette isn't a requirement in America. It's his right as an American to be a douchebag. :-) You don't hate America, do you?

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      09-02-2012 02:42 PM #56
      I will be sending him an IM. I have been reading his posts and I like what I see. I have also read from people who have worked with him and the reviews are great!!
      2004 TTQ 225 Blueflame Exhaust, APR, Modshack, Dieselgeek Shortshift

    7. 09-29-2012 03:03 AM #57
      With the 2012 SCCA Solo Nationals in the book, this is the car to beat in the newly restructured B-Street-Prepared (BSP). The class is populated mostly with S2000, M3, 350Z, and a few Corvettes. The car is well prepped and driven by Jason Uyeda:

      - 18X11 wheels with 285/295 Hoosiers (as much tire as I do, but at least 500 lbs lighter)
      - Low weight and CG (2500 lbs or less for BSP prepped cars)
      - Decent power with ITB (300 WHP but only 220 WTQ so it's a momentum car vs point-n-shoot like the TT)
      - Great handling (much better than the TT at least)
      - Low traction compared to an AWD car like the TT (this is where I believe I can get the advantage to allow me to challenge on paper)









      I really feel that I can challenge for the win in this redesigned class. Being under the radar (not voluntarily) for the past year has paid off, I really didn't want the TT to be classed in ASP with the other AWD turbos and other potent cars (Evo, STI, Solstice/Sky, Cayman S etc). If I can put down 350 AWHP and 400 AWHP safely and consistently, get the car in the low 3000 lbs (or even sub-3000), have a rear LSD fitted, I have a pretty solid chance on paper. I need to quit chasing power at this point because I'm pretty close to my mark, and focus on putting the car on a diet (much more expensive than making power on a turbo car).

      In the "to do" list for next season:
      - Corbau Clubman seats
      - Aftermarket airbagless steering wheel
      - Radio/speaker/sub/disc changer removal (I know I should get the AC out too, but can't make peace with it yet. Please someone convince me )
      - Rear Peloquin LSD
      - High flow exhaust manifold (fully ported/extrude honed stock unit, or cast aftermaket)
      Last edited by Marcus_Aurelius; 09-29-2012 at 03:38 AM.

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      09-29-2012 06:29 AM #58
      Intake Mani!

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      09-29-2012 08:03 AM #59
      Be sure to post your weight savings! I'm very interested in what you come up with and if there is something I missed. I have pulled out everything including the a/c. Still have full interior for the front though. I shaved some parts of the dash with the heavy metal backing and lost a few pounds there as well. I haven't got to weight the car for a precise number, just adding up what I lose. The exhaust had a crossmember (I'm fwd so I don't know I you have it) that weighed a good amount I was able to replace with some ingenuity and a welder. Next step is a Valero 3-row front radiator and custom fan setup. I didn't run a full exhaust, just went with a side exit to reduce amount of piping. I just need the most important weight reduction, lightweight rims to get rid of some unsprung weight. I'm really interested to see what you come up with. I tried to lose weight in places that wouldn't completely shatter the integrity of the TT. Interior wise I just removed the rear seat and relocated my betters there to get it as close to the CG as possible until I can get it corner balanced and will move it to the appropriate spot then.

    10. 09-29-2012 08:13 AM #60
      Quote Originally Posted by 20v master View Post
      Intake Mani!
      Adam, while I got you on the hook what's you're take on this:
      I saw someone pick up a bunch of WHP on the dyno with a SEM on a small port head (transition spacers to mate the head and 70 mm TB). However, he a also lost significant WTQ in the process (from onset to midrange) and that's a bad tradeoff for my application. His car was a VW and also had cams, so not apple to apple to apple comparison, but got me thinking. I looked, but never found good straightforward data on a car with stock turbo, SP head, and throttle body. Also what would you say is the appropriate TB size to run?

    11. Member Chickenman35's Avatar
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      09-29-2012 01:27 PM #61
      Quote Originally Posted by Marcus_Aurelius View Post
      Adam, while I got you on the hook what's you're take on this:
      I saw someone pick up a bunch of WHP on the dyno with a SEM on a small port head (transition spacers to mate the head and 70 mm TB). However, he a also lost significant WTQ in the process (from onset to midrange) and that's a bad tradeoff for my application. His car was a VW and also had cams, so not apple to apple to apple comparison, but got me thinking. I looked, but never found good straightforward data on a car with stock turbo, SP head, and throttle body. Also what would you say is the appropriate TB size to run?
      Just my .02c. I would never sacrifice torque for a HP gain in an Autocross car, unless the car was a High RPM, lightweight car such as a Miata or Honda...and the HP gain was very substantial.

      Regarding TB size..for Auotocross I wouldn't go more more than 10 mm over stock. Anything larger messes up the mid range driveabilty, and that is all important for our use
      "...I recommend books. People who don't know what they're talking about are less likely to write a book about the subject...."

    12. 09-29-2012 02:06 PM #62
      Quote Originally Posted by seth_3515 View Post
      Be sure to post your weight savings! I'm very interested in what you come up with and if there is something I missed. I have pulled out everything including the a/c. Still have full interior for the front though. I shaved some parts of the dash with the heavy metal backing and lost a few pounds there as well. I haven't got to weight the car for a precise number, just adding up what I lose. The exhaust had a crossmember (I'm fwd so I don't know I you have it) that weighed a good amount I was able to replace with some ingenuity and a welder. Next step is a Valero 3-row front radiator and custom fan setup. I didn't run a full exhaust, just went with a side exit to reduce amount of piping. I just need the most important weight reduction, lightweight rims to get rid of some unsprung weight. I'm really interested to see what you come up with. I tried to lose weight in places that wouldn't completely shatter the integrity of the TT. Interior wise I just removed the rear seat and relocated my betters there to get it as close to the CG as possible until I can get it corner balanced and will move it to the appropriate spot then.
      Will do some in-detail comparisons when the seats arrive, I'll take the radio/speakers and do the seat as a single weight reduction project.


      (meant to post in your build thread about spring rates the other day, but ran out of time. I see that you plan on trying different rates on your rear coils, it won't work well because the shocks can't control much of an increase in rate due to their narrow valving. That's the reason why I tried to warn you against them in the beginning. IIRC, a 1k bumb in rate is all they will control properly. You'd have to get them revalved or move to a better shock, which pretty easy in the rear.)
      Last edited by Marcus_Aurelius; 09-29-2012 at 03:25 PM.

    13. 09-29-2012 03:24 PM #63
      Quote Originally Posted by Chickenman35 View Post
      Just my .02c. I would never sacrifice torque for a HP gain in an Autocross car, unless the car was a High RPM, lightweight car such as a Miata or Honda...and the HP gain was very substantial.
      Trust me, I know better! Everything I've done to date is to boost TQ onset and keep it as fat as possible throughout the powerband. My mantra has been "I could care less about HP up top if it costs me a single foot pound where it really counts", and it's not about to change. My problem is that, I have not seen conclusive testing on various intake manifolds available nowadays as single variables... and can't afford to buy a few to test unless they are sponsored. I have heard that SEM unit retained TQ figures, but the dyno test I witnessed proved otherwise (although on a car with cams and a 70 mm TB). I am asking Adam because he is really versed when it comes to making power on a 20v, and maybe he can point out something that I'm overlooking.

      Quote Originally Posted by Chickenman35 View Post
      Regarding TB size..for Auotocross I wouldn't go more more than 10 mm over stock. Anything larger messes up the mid range driveabilty, and that is all important for our use
      Here again, I'm asking Adam because he would know better than most what would work best, and probably tried them all. My plan was to run stock or maybe a 65 mm at the most, but I guess that's something I can test out pretty easily in a weekend of autocrossing (just swap back and forth with appropriate software tweaks, and let track feel and the clock sort it out).

      I'm getting excited to go mix it up with the S2Ks and M3s (they finished 2nd, 3rd, 4th behind the Honda, so can't be written out). For some reason, I don't feel shaken by them like I used to with the miatas in CSP. BSP's combined time for both courses at Nationals was 125.352 for the top dog, while the CSP champ was running 120s combined time (enough the clean ASP with the EVOs and even SSP with the Z06, Lotus, viper and Ferrari). It amazes me that the TT was ever classed with the miatas when they are clearly in a league of their own when it comes to tracking and autocross.

    14. 09-30-2012 02:24 AM #64
      Probably the wrong spot to discuss this but with Chickenman and Adam around I'll put it out for discussion. I have gone to great length to add caster in my car and gain dynamic camber. The results were as expected as I only needed -2.6 of front static compensation to get perfect temperature spread across the 295 Hoo-Hoo. At full load, with the extra caster, I am also getting a picture perfect perpendicular tire profile (contact patch not being lifted by camber going positive at the end of the dynamic curve).

      All that is nice and cute, but after my first set of 295 front Hoosiers and despite the ideal temp spread, the outer edges seems to take a lot more beating still. My only theory is that even if the whole thread width is remaining flat, the outer portion of the tire gets loaded more/faster with weight transfer (making it do more work). My theory seems to have holes in it because this should have impacted temperatures as well (at least on paper).

      Hoosier themselves recommend at least -3 to -3.5 of static camber for the square shouldered A6. The practice shows that most nationally competitive guys run -4 degrees or more on McCrapson front suspensions. Would this mean that I would need to go back to suboptimal static compensation angles to make the most out of them? I can easily add the camber but does a suboptimal camber curving worth it to keep a tire happy? I never had this problem with the V710 rounded shoulders but like the extra grip and transition speed of the Hoosier much better (295 is also ideal for a fitment and gearing compromise). What gives?

    15. Member babarber's Avatar
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      09-30-2012 08:13 PM #65
      theories and paper specs for alignment are good and all but the only true way to determine what you need is lap times

      just add static camber until your lap times start to go the other way
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      because race springs
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    16. 09-30-2012 09:02 PM #66
      Quote Originally Posted by babarber View Post
      just add static camber until your lap times start to go the other way
      I wish it was that simple

      Remember, my roots is in karting and road racing, the Solo thing is just the new hobby. What you described there, is basic "track tuning" which is specific to whatever track you did the testing in (within a certain range of conditions). This is common practice in road racing when you want to optimize for a track, but we're talking about a Solo car here. Solo is unique in many ways because you never get the same conditions or course ever.

      Say you were to test and apply your suggested formula for a slalom intensive runaway type course, the optimal camber setting would be totally off for a course with equal use of sweepers and transitions. Besides that, the need to optimize tire wear comes into play as well. So overall, tuning in Solo require some compromising to find that happy medium that will work in the greatest range of course combinations and also keep tire wear acceptable. This is what I'm asking about... kind of thinking if it make sense to give up optimal camber curving to help the specific Hoosier A6 work and last more efficiently over their usable life. Keep the inputs coming, they are greatly appreciated!
      Last edited by Marcus_Aurelius; 10-03-2012 at 01:49 AM.

    17. Member babarber's Avatar
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      09-30-2012 09:06 PM #67
      i never really thought of it that way
      it works for my local club because most of the courses use the same elements just set up in different order, etc
      Quote Originally Posted by G3T3I7 View Post
      because race springs
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    18. Member Chickenman35's Avatar
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      09-30-2012 11:48 PM #68
      Autocrossing is a unique discipline that deviates from the normal practices of chassis tuning familiar to Road Racers and Track Day runners.

      Because of the short course and violent transitions made in Autocrossing, normal tire data logging can lead you astray.

      Setting camber angles by evening out Tire temperatures is not necessarily the optimum setup on an Autocross car. You seldom get courses long enough ( except at Nationals in a hot climate ) to stabilize the carcass temperature. Surface temperature readings ( as with an Infrared gun ) can be very inaccurate. Carcass readings with a proper tire probe is better, but again, the run times are so short that the tire carcass seldom reaches it's optimal range or even gets close to an even heat distribution.

      For Autocross you have to give the car and tire what it likes. Often this means running more negative camber ( especially with Mac strut cars ) than what Skid pad testing and testing on a Road Course would indicate.

      The violent steering transitions during an Autocross often EXCEED the peak G readings of steady state cornering, that the same car can achieve on a Road Course. Road Racing also uses less steering lock and slip angles than Autocross. Transitional weight loading on the outside tire can also peak at a much higher value than when Road Racing. This all places additional load on the outside shoulder of the tire. Load that may not show up as heat ( because of the short time involved ) on a tire probe but it is still a "scrubbing" and weight load applied to the tire shoulder. And the only way to make the tire live is to decrease that outside load on the tire. Usually by adding extra Negative camber. EGOD and Scallops from Hell were evils solely inflicted on Autocross tires ( for the most part )

      With Autocross, what you essentially have, is a cold rigid carcass, being thrown into VIOLENT maneuvers at maximum loadings for a very short period of time. With this criteria in mind, you have to make compromises...the normal " Text Book " methods do not apply 100%.

      End of part 1:
      Last edited by Chickenman35; 10-01-2012 at 11:01 AM.
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    19. Member Chickenman35's Avatar
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      10-01-2012 01:03 AM #69
      Part 2:

      Important Edit: Changed all references of Narrower " Taller " tire to Narrower Higher Aspect Ratio tire. Taller was a poor choice of words. Comparison of wide tire vs narrow tires would be with same overall diameters. Changes only in aspect ratio and possible rim sizing ( IE: 18 > 17 >16 ) Twas late at nite.....


      Specific to Autocross setups. An Autocross car has to be able to make extremely quick transitional changes. A Road Race car with a " proper " Autocross setup would be, and should be... bloody scary to drive. Waaayy too pointy and " on the nose ".

      But the Autocross setup, does pose some interesting challenges in tire selection. Much depends on the type of course you run ( Length, asphalt, concrete etc ) and the climate where you live. Cars in the Northern States and Canada cannot run as wide a tire ( particularly fronts on a RWD car ) as cars in the Southern climates. You simply can't get the tire's tread warmed up fast enough. ( Forget about warming the carcass. You better learn to drive on cold rigid carcasses if you live in the Pacific NorthWest ).

      Bigger..is not always better. Particularly on the front tires of a RWD and AWD car. John Ames always tended to run a slightly narrower and ( Higher Aspect Ratio ) tire combination than his competition when he was campaigning the Mustang ( Mac strut car with poor camber curves )

      Here is "some" of the reasoning.

      1: Braking sensitivity. A very wide tire ( EG: 315/35 x17 or 315/30x 18 ) has an extremely stiff carcass. This gives a high spring rate to the tire. With violent braking done in Autocross, the tire is less forgiving to lockup. Now...ABS will prevent lockup...but a narrower/HAR tire ( 265/45 x16 or 275/40x 17 ) will often stop quicker, even with ABS.

      The narrower and HAR tire has less internal spring rate, making it is less prone to rebound ( a tire carcass is undamped ). The narrower tire's tread surface will heat quicker under braking and the narrower tire carcass will tend to elongate and flow into the surface, creating a LARGER overall contact patch than a stiff wide tire. The narrow/HAR tire is much more forgiving to changing camber angles under braking than a wide low aspect ratio tire. All of these differences are exaggerated as the ambient temperature and course temperature drops.

      2: Slow speed turn-in. A very wide and short sidewall tire can have slower turn-in response than a narrower/taller tire. Again this is due to the inflexibility of the sidewall and the high internal spring rate of the tire itself. The tire tread temperature also plays a big part, just as in braking.

      Where the situation really gets bad with a very wide front tire is when you get into things like scrub radius and camber jacking in turns. Most production cars these days are designed with zero or negative scrub radius on the front. Wider rims and tires usually force you into using a combination with more offset..thus increasing positive scrub radius. This completely buggers the suspension tuning of the front. The more positive scrub radius that you have, the more problems you have. Increased sensitivity to camber jacking in turns. Increased corner scrub ( increased drag and wear on tire is never good ) Increased loadings on bearings and suspension components, including steering racks and PS pumps.

      Somewhere you have to find a happy " compromise " as Max mentioned.

      I ran 265x45 x16 V700 and V710's on my ESP Camaro car for years. I experimented with V710 315/35x 17's one year. Conclusion at end of season. 265's performed better under braking and slow corner turn-in. 315's were only better in high speed corners where 265's ran short of grip. The 265's put down more power on launch and slow speed corner exit as well. Mainly due to the flexibility of the HAR sidewall and the tread getting up to temperature faster ( NOTE: PNW ambient temps in the low 70 to low 80's range ).

      The car was one of the quickest Autocross and Hill climb ESP cars in the PNW when I campaigned it. I sold the car back in 2006. Had I kept it, I had come to the conclusion that I was running a bit short of grip in the rear for Hillclimbs and Road Race/Track Days. Had I kept the car, I was planning on stepping up to 275/40x17 fronts and 295/40x17 rears. The 315/35x17's had too limited of an operating range in regards to track configuration ( only faster in high speed corners such as at a FAST Road Course such as Portland International ) and they were too sensitive to low ambient temperatures ( useless under 75 -80f ambient ).
      Last edited by Chickenman35; 10-01-2012 at 12:35 PM.
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    20. Member Chickenman35's Avatar
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      10-01-2012 01:07 AM #70
      BTW..I've also run Yokohoma's and Hoosiers throughout the years...but that is another Looooonnnnng story.

      Bottom line for me...Hoosiers are very good in a very narrow operating window. Lord help you if the weather got too cold ( below 75-80f ), or if the pits were a bit " dusty ", or if the surface isn't right ( Hoosier and smooth, hot, and clean asphalt = Hoosiers on anything else = ).

      And you better have a fat wallet to run Hoosiers. BFG's, Yoko's and Kumho's...you could run those till the cord showed. They'd get progressively slower....but Hoosiers ( when I was running them, Circa A3's and A4's ) would go off from one weekend to the next. Just like the Pirelli F1 tires...they would " fall off the cliff " and the tire was useless...with about 50% of it's tread life remaining.

      Just my .02c
      Last edited by Chickenman35; 10-01-2012 at 02:49 AM.
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    21. Member Chickenman35's Avatar
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      10-01-2012 01:51 AM #71
      BTW. EGOD ( Evil Groove of Doom ) and SFH ( Scallops from Hell ) were unusual tire wear patterns that occurred on BFG DOT tires. Purely due to design errors that BFG never really admitted. ( well they did after most of their engineers left to work for Kumho ).

      Our car club ( VCMC ) has close sponsorship tie-ins with Kumho. We got to talk to the chief Kumho race tire engineer at our yearly end banquet and got a preview of the V710, long before they went "public" in 2003.

      Can't remember the guys name now...but he was an ex-BFG Tire Engineer. He was very forth coming and held us spellbound like kindergarten kids being read Hansel and Gretel.

      The Kumho V700 carcass was a direct copy of the first generation BFG R1 ( 206 compound ). Kumho had to get something up and running fast, and the 1st gen BFG R1 was the best carcass that the BFG engineers felt that they ever built. The later asymmetrical designs were the an admitted disaster ( see EGOD and SFH )....by the engineers themselves!! The 1st gen BFG tire was a favorite of many experienced drivers and no wonder that the V700 VictoRacer felt exactly the same as the original R1. The carcass and the compounds used on the V700 VictoRacer were virtually identical to the 1st gen R1...only the tread pattern was changed so that BFG couldn't sue them!!

      The V710 incorporated new compounds and carcass revisions developed since the the original R1 design. Part of the design criteria was that the tire must outperform the V700 in every aspect. Overall grip, hot and cold performance, adaptability to different surfaces, and and a product life that was consistent and cost effective to the average racer. One thing Kumho would not compromise on was the "feel" of the tire. That they wanted to be the same as the original design...built way back in the late 1980's.
      "...I recommend books. People who don't know what they're talking about are less likely to write a book about the subject...."

    22. 10-01-2012 02:27 AM #72
      Excellent posts as usual Richard, and Thanks for taking the time to put together elaborate answers to my question!

      I have found my answer in your first post:

      Quote Originally Posted by Chickenman35 View Post
      Setting camber angles by evening out Tire temperatures is not necessarily the optimum setup on an Autocross car.

      The violent steering transitions during an Autocross carcass often EXCEED the peak G readings of steady state cornering ... Transitional weight loading on the outside tire can also peak at a much higher value than when Road Racing. This all places additional load on the outside shoulder of the tire. Load that may not show up as heat ( because of the short time involved ) on a tire probe but it is still a "scrubbing" and weight load applied to the tire shoulder. And the only way to make the tire live is to decrease that outside load on the tire. Usually by adding extra Negative camber. EGOD and Scallops from Hell were evils solely inflicted on Autocross tires ( for the most part )
      I had a feeling that the tires were calling for more static compensation and were happier operating at higher dynamic angles. However, my road racing instincts were blinding me into thinking that an evenly probed temperature spread meant gold. It wasn't until the first set of front Hoosiers corded on their outer portion that it all came to me. It was an experimental set for me, as I am an usual V710 customer that made the switch to Hoosier a season ago because they had the "perfect" sizing/height for the TT's weight and gearing (square shoulders were also appealing on a front heavy 3000+ lbs car on taller sidewalls of 17").

      As you confirmed, the frequent quick transitions of Solo had the outer front tires scrubbing more than the rest as a result load spikes; but their duration were short enough to not necessarily show on the probe temp spread (it doesn't seems to be the case in the non-steering axle that I believe will still benefit from tuning on temperature). I am going to listen to what the tires are telling me and ignore the suboptimal spot of the camber curve that they want to operate in.

      Right now, I am sitting at -2.6 degree of front static compensation. I am going for -4 degrees on my next set and see where that takes me in terms of tire wear.

    23. 10-01-2012 03:09 AM #73
      To touch a bit on your part 2, I ran 315x17 V710s previously and the slower response compared to a somewhat narrower thread width seemed to make sense (this was my response-vs-overall grip compromise). Despite my previous success with Kumho, my goal was to start aiming at Nats which called for the switch to Hoosiers. As you mentioned, they do have a narrower window of operation and are a lot less forgiving with temperature, pressure, and camber angles. On top of that they do "fall of a cliff" at about 20-30 runs as opposed to the gradually tapering 710s. However, they offer a clear advantage on response and grip, on a fresh set, over everything else (obviously operating within the discussed parameters). Furthermore, Hoosier had the perfect size and height to work with my real estate and gearing, so it made them the smart choice despite the heavy hit on the budget, only to get a truly effective 20-30 runs. I feel that they are the ticket for this car once I get them fully sorted (I haven't nailed the optimal pressure range yet). Next season should be loads of fun!

    24. Member Chickenman35's Avatar
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      10-01-2012 11:15 AM #74
      Yes..if you want to win the Nationals, the Hoosiers are your best bet. Wallet is going to take a pounding though

      Kumho is coming out with a replacement for the V710 in the near future... Now if I can just find the article

      Gonna PM you about some setup ideas with your car

      Made some important changes in Post #2 regarding Higher Aspect Ratio with same overall diameter tire.
      Last edited by Chickenman35; 10-01-2012 at 11:37 AM.
      "...I recommend books. People who don't know what they're talking about are less likely to write a book about the subject...."

    25. 10-02-2012 12:01 AM #75
      ^^^

      Yeah, the goal is to sneak up at Nationals and contend for a jacket. The car, in a much stiffer CSP class, a lot less power and prep, trophied at National tours and ProSolos 2 years ago. I'm hoping to head to Nats with only a tour and a Pro as real practice (even sandbag a bit there if necessary) and draw no attention to myself. Last thing I want is to have people writing letters to get the TT out of BSP and classed with the other AWD boost buggies in ASP.
      Last edited by Marcus_Aurelius; 10-02-2012 at 05:39 AM.

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