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    Thread: Pumps - what do you use on longer rides?

    1. Member
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      08-15-2012 03:40 PM #1
      I'm prepping for the NY Century ride on Sept. 9th.

      http://nyccentury.org/

      I've done a few century's over the past few years and I've always ridden with 1 water bottle (filled with an energy drink) and a camelback-style backpack filled with extra tubes, tool, food, a small pump (and water, of course).

      I'm thinking of losing the backpack.. adding an extra water bottle on the frame.. and adding a small saddle-bag to hold an extra tube, tool and maybe a powerbar or gel or something.

      I don't need to carry too much food as there are rest stops on this ride, but I'm wondering...

      For longer rides.. what kind of pump (if any) do you use??

      I've used Co2 cartridges in the past but I'm not a fan.

      Any thoughts? Suggestions?

      THANKS!!


      - Matty

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      08-15-2012 04:05 PM #2
      Came in to post CO2 cartridges, sees OP does not like them, back out of thread slowly....

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      08-15-2012 04:25 PM #3
      the Lezyne hand pump is pretty great. I personally hate hand pumps and almost always use co2 but a friend has one I've had to use a couple of times. It's the only one I'd buy for myself.

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      08-15-2012 04:25 PM #4
      I have a Lezyne pump that is always in my Camelbak for mtn bike rides or mounted to the frame of my road bike. I like it since it has a hose to attach to the valve making inflation a little easier.

    5. Senior Member J-Tim's Avatar
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      08-15-2012 08:57 PM #5
      Most definitely lose the backback.

      Put two tubes and gels inside the small saddle bag, stuff a small pump and bananas in your pocket and carry two bottles on the frame.

      As you said yourself, a 160km is not THAT long, plus you're going to have refuel stations along the way.
      The gloves are off, the wisdom teeth are out
      What you on about ?

    6. Member Scott53's Avatar
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      08-15-2012 09:46 PM #6
      On my Moots I have a Topeak frame pump. I've used it more times on friends bikes than I can count. It works very well. Pumps up into the 90 psi with no problem. I only wish it had a gauge on it.

      http://www.topeak.com/products/Pumps...54cm_framesize
      Photobucket

      But I REALLY like the Topeak Morph G I bought for the weeks I was cycling on the west coast and needed a pump that does it all. It has a flip out foot, a gauge, and a small hose so I'm not having to brace the tire with my hand at the end of the pump. It also converts fast from Presta to Schrader, a feature I needed for my vintage Nishiki and my friend's modern Trek. If I could make it look good on my Moots, I'd use it there. If you need to borrow it Matt, let me know. I'm in Montclair most weekends.

      http://www.topeak.com/products/Pumps/RoadMorphG
      Photobucket

      Scott
      Last edited by Scott53; 08-15-2012 at 10:05 PM.

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      08-16-2012 09:30 AM #7
      i use an old Silca frame pump that still works great, better than the mini topeak one i carry in my bag for commuting (which works well). it can only be used on a traditional steel frame though with the way the mounts are built. if you have a crazy carbon monocoque frame i'm not sure a frame pump will fit anywhere

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      08-16-2012 09:47 AM #8
      Wow! Thanks everyone for all the advice!!

      (Hi Scott! Nice MOOTS!! )

      The small pump I have (I forget the brand) works fine... I guess I can use the velcro straps it came with and mount it to my bike for the day. I'll be picking up a saddle bag (and some new compact bars) on Saturday. I may check to see if my LBS has a smaller pump that I can stuff in a jersey back-pocket.

      Thanks again for all the feedback guys! Totally helpful!


      - Matty

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      08-16-2012 11:18 AM #9
      Quote Originally Posted by withnail View Post
      the Lezyne hand pump is pretty great. I personally hate hand pumps and almost always use co2 but a friend has one I've had to use a couple of times. It's the only one I'd buy for myself.
      I agree. If you're going to get a mini-pump, I would recommend one that has a flexible tube that attaches to your valve stem, like this. Makes it much easier to achieve a higher pressure without worrying about snapping your valve stem.

    10. Member alakai's Avatar
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      08-16-2012 03:21 PM #10
      Quote Originally Posted by crawford View Post
      I agree. If you're going to get a mini-pump, I would recommend one that has a flexible tube that attaches to your valve stem, like this. Makes it much easier to achieve a higher pressure without worrying about snapping your valve stem.
      x3. I have the Lezyne Pressure Drive. It pumps up to 120psi in a very compact size. The hose is definitely a plus, and you simply screw in the other end for those who need Schrader compatibility.

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      08-17-2012 08:32 AM #11
      lezyne road drive is a good hand pump.... the aluminum version is a good value

      however, bigger fan of more puncture resistant tires. sometimes they don't roll as fast... but beats changing a puncture flat...

      ride to Montauk is a ride notorious for puncture flats.... bontrager race all weather hardcase served me well in that ride in my old wheelset. now running conti grand Prix 4 seasons
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    12. Member VWAddict's Avatar
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      08-17-2012 03:24 PM #12
      Just bought a Blackburn Airstik SL. There's no flexible tube, but it's TINY, and weighs about as much as a recently-licked postage stamp. -Fits Presta only, but all my bikes are presta. -Feels VERY well made, will assess it's pumping ability this weekend.
      Quote Originally Posted by MisterJJ View Post
      A "jump from a VW to an Audi"?!? I wouldn't call it a jump. It's more like shuffling along the sidewalk, tripping on a crack, bumping into a gorgeous blonde, walking away in a daze, and later finding out that she stole your wallet.

    13. 08-17-2012 03:35 PM #13
      stuff tubes, food, tools, and pump in your jersey pockets. youll be good to go.

      I use lezyne pumps as well though i do find that they arent the same quality they use to be.

      Also +1 on using a puncture resistant tire like a gatorskin/conti grand Prix 4 seasons/thickslick/ect compared to a race/soft compound tire.

    14. Member impact's Avatar
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      08-19-2012 09:34 AM #14


      Mostly just echoing stuff that has already been said.

      - puncture-resistant tires

      - Lezyne

      - rubber hose

      - mount it on the frame

      The one thing I want to add is that floor pumps are superior to hand pumps. Sure, they are a bit bigger (so you can't easily stuff them in a pocket), but when you actually have to use them, it's easier to get a good grip.

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      10-01-2012 02:10 AM #15
      How difficult is it for your pumps to do 120 psi? My old Blackburn MDS-2 supposedly can do 160 psi, but I struggle to get in 50 psi. I shudder to think what it'd be like to do 120 psi, let alone when it's below freezing. If I can find a pump that won't kill me to get to 120 psi, I'm interested, but right now I'm looking at combo pump/cartridge solutions. I figure I'll pump to 50 psi, and then screw on a CO2 cartridge to get me the rest of the way. If I have more flats, then I limp home with a spongy 50 psi tire.

      The pump I like most is the Innovations Second Wind Road Carbon Mini.
      Quote Originally Posted by apizzaparty View Post
      never thought once to use my lefty for the brake. sorry in my opinion it is dumb.

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      10-01-2012 05:49 AM #16
      Just a quick follow-up...

      I wound up using a cheapo Schwinn mini-pump that I had laying around in my garage. Frame mounted exactly the same way that Impact shows above. I also carried an extra tube and a multi-tool (along with some cash, ID and my cell phone) in my seat bag.

      I figured that, even with the cheapo pump, I'd still be able to replace the tube and get enough air in there to at least get to a gas station, bike shop on the route, or a rest stop where they had regular floor-pumps.

      The pump stayed in place perfectly for the entire ride (I didn't even notice it at all)... and luckily I didn't get any flats!! That's a first for me!!

      I wound up riding a total of ~106 miles. Had a total blast!!

      Thanks for all of your feedback on this. It was definitely helpful!!


      - Matty

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      10-01-2012 07:42 AM #17
      ^ good stuff!

    18. Member woodrowstar's Avatar
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      10-03-2012 09:48 AM #18
      This post just reminded me of an issue I keep having: A frame pump that will fit a small frame rider... 48cm?

    19. Banned Saintor's Avatar
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      06-29-2013 12:13 PM #19
      I learned the hard way not to settle with a cheap pump. The rigid hard plastic one are worth nothing. I had a replacement tube but was never able to inflate it. Should have tested it anyway.

      I bought this one and it is perfect. Threaded socket in metal, extension hose, stylish on my bike.

      http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/catego...-pump-10-37558


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      06-30-2013 11:02 AM #20
      Having the ability to use CO2 and opting for a hand pump is like saying "I don't want to have an iPod, I'd rather have a portable 8 track player." All hand pumps suck moose balls. I can't imagine why anyone would rather lug around some crappy pump that barely works when they could just take some CO2 and the screw on top to it?

    21. Banned Saintor's Avatar
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      07-05-2013 08:58 AM #21
      Quality hand pumps work just fine. There is no additional cost. And you don't have to exhaust CO2 and put back air later (if repaired onsite).

    22. Member impact's Avatar
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      07-05-2013 03:04 PM #22
      Quote Originally Posted by Quattro Krant View Post
      Having the ability to use CO2 and opting for a hand pump is like saying "I don't want to have an iPod, I'd rather have a portable 8 track player." All hand pumps suck moose balls. I can't imagine why anyone would rather lug around some crappy pump that barely works when they could just take some CO2 and the screw on top to it?
      It's a bit like full size spare vs. fix-a-flat kit. Some people just prefer full size spare.

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      07-05-2013 05:56 PM #23
      Quote Originally Posted by synthsis View Post
      Came in to post CO2 cartridges, sees OP does not like them, back out of thread slowly....
      ****, I'm out.

    24. 07-06-2013 12:56 AM #24
      Quote Originally Posted by GoRacers View Post
      ****, I'm out.
      seconded

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