Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    VWVortex


    Links back to The Car Lounge (opens in same window)
    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
    Results 1 to 35 of 67

    Thread: Let's talk about Straight 8s

    1. Member MAG58's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 14th, 2011
      Location
      Indy
      Posts
      1,167
      Vehicles
      It's broken.
      08-20-2012 12:11 AM #1
      I see all these engine threads talking about I6, V6, VR6, I4, V8, V12, and all other sorts of fun engines, so let's talk about my favorite impractical engine configuration from days gone by: the straight 8.

      Duesenberg:


      Pontiac:


      Buick Straight 8 in a 240SX:


      Coolest: Turbo Buick in a Jaguar:



      Discuss

    2. Member WD-40's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 8th, 2005
      Location
      Midwest USA
      Posts
      2,219
      08-20-2012 12:26 AM #2



    3. Member personman's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 24th, 2008
      Location
      TX
      Posts
      1,147
      Vehicles
      03 Golf, 94 GS500, 13 WRX
      08-20-2012 12:37 AM #3
      Quote Originally Posted by WD-40 View Post


      That's actually one of the easier tightening sequences I've seen.

    4. Member Shomegrown's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 26th, 2002
      Location
      Detroit
      Posts
      16,925
      Vehicles
      Current: Audi S4, Q5 TDI quattro, Porsche Boxster S, Dodge Dakota 4x4
      08-20-2012 12:47 AM #4
      That Lawwill rearend was really ahead of its time - solid choice.


    5. Member GTE77's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 2nd, 2009
      Location
      Florida / Rio de Janeiro
      Posts
      4,074
      Vehicles
      Puma GTE / Audi A3 8L
      08-20-2012 12:54 AM #5
      This will be one LOOOOOOOOng conversation.

    6. 08-20-2012 01:04 AM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by GTE77 View Post
      This will be one LOOOOOOOOng conversation.
      I read this and thought, "lol, what if there were 8 O's, like a straight 8..."

      Well played.

    7. Member
      Join Date
      Jul 13th, 2010
      Location
      Langley, whidbey island, Washington
      Posts
      1,033
      Vehicles
      1963 Volvo 1800 S, '84 jetta
      08-20-2012 01:23 AM #7
      Might as well bring Harry Miller into this conversation:



      1923







      Quote Originally Posted by cartalk
      "As near as I could tell, the car was built from compressed rust."

    8. Member WD-40's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 8th, 2005
      Location
      Midwest USA
      Posts
      2,219
      08-20-2012 01:24 AM #8
      Quote Originally Posted by personman View Post
      That's actually one of the easier tightening sequences I've seen.
      How about this one then?


    9. Member Rukh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 25th, 2003
      Location
      Florida
      Posts
      7,651
      Vehicles
      '02 Jetta Wagon
      08-20-2012 01:34 AM #9
      That one looks like tons of fun.

      Chrysler Atlantic had a "Straight Eight" - essentially two Neon I4s end to end, IIRC.

      HAVE/HAD: Mercedes, Porsche, Cadillac, Land Rover, VW (x5), Buick, Mitsubishi, Chrysler, Dodge, Nissan, Ford, GMC
      WANT: FIAT 500C Abarth, VW Scirocco Mk1, Alfa Romeo GTV, Lotus Esprit, Audi TT, 240Z, Lancer Evo VIII RS,
      Hudson Hornet, Porsche 964, Mini Cooper, Caterham SV, M-B CLS63 AMG, DeTomaso Pantera

    10. Member
      Join Date
      Jul 19th, 2010
      Location
      Cambridge, MA
      Posts
      943
      Vehicles
      '03 mini cooper S, '83 jetta
      08-20-2012 01:42 AM #10
      miller?

      you bet!



      Packard is nicely done as well '29

      Quote Originally Posted by wantacad View Post
      hey now, unbolting the rear bumper, dropping the beam and gas tank to change out an exhaust hanger is perfectly normal.

    11. Member derekjl's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 23rd, 2006
      Posts
      3,715
      Vehicles
      2007 VW GTI, 2007 Lexus IS250
      08-20-2012 01:49 AM #11
      "It's a 1949 Buick Roadmaster. Straight-Eight. Fireball Eight. Dad lets me drive on the driveway, but not on Monday."



      Need VAG-COM work in CNY? PM me!

      OEM+

    12. Member personman's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 24th, 2008
      Location
      TX
      Posts
      1,147
      Vehicles
      03 Golf, 94 GS500, 13 WRX
      08-20-2012 01:59 AM #12
      Quote Originally Posted by WD-40 View Post
      How about this one then?
      That's more like it!

    13. Member mx5er's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 28th, 2001
      Location
      NY
      Posts
      12,944
      08-20-2012 02:26 AM #13
      Who remembers the Ford T Drive???




    14. Member
      Join Date
      Feb 2nd, 2000
      Location
      BelgiëBelgique
      Posts
      5,156
      Vehicles
      car less
      08-20-2012 03:04 AM #14
      I had the naughty thought recently of making a Type43 or 44 Bugatti replica hotrod style with a custom VR8 for packaging practicality and the VAG connection. And to make it totally blasphemous I'd have it done by an American hotrod builder. I have no money - however.
      Also - it would be interesting to build a VR engine for maximum revs (Honda Vtec style) since these hotrods don't weight much anyways.













      Last edited by AuForm; 08-20-2012 at 03:14 AM.

    15. Member MCTB's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 29th, 2005
      Location
      vicinity of Rabbit5GTI
      Posts
      7,864
      Vehicles
      '12 Focus SE, '72 MGB GT, '58 MGA
      08-20-2012 07:32 AM #15
      Quote Originally Posted by mx5er View Post
      Who remembers the Ford T Drive???



      What is this?

    16. Member
      Join Date
      Nov 3rd, 2008
      Location
      DC Metro Area
      Posts
      3,166
      Vehicles
      06 Mustang GT Vert 5MT, 08 TSX 5AT, 95 Volvo 850 GLT 4AT
      08-20-2012 07:43 AM #16
      How about a 12.5 liter Straight 8?

      Bugatti Royale Engine:

      http://sixsylinder.blogspot.com

      Quote Originally Posted by stacman View Post
      Top gear recommended it, so I bought it.

    17. Member Geechie_Suede's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 17th, 2009
      Location
      Grand Rapids, MI
      Posts
      2,956
      Vehicles
      01 Crown Vic P71
      08-20-2012 08:13 AM #17
      Quote Originally Posted by MCTB View Post
      What is this?
      It's a prototype Tempo with a Straight-8 sideways. IIRC, it was some project Ford was doing developing transverse Inline engines for FWD applications.

      EDIT:
      http://www.drivingenthusiast.net/sec...ve/default.htm

      In the last 30 years, Ford has produced several experimental engine developments which were ultimately abandoned. Most have never been seen, much less detailed technically. T-Drive is one of them; another was the stratified charge V-8 engine of the 70s. We've finally found some information on T-Drive, a truly unique and innovative system. We'm still looking for information on the stratified-charge V-8, and while some information was published 30 years ago about it I haven't yet been able to find any information about it in my personal library. I remember seeing a picture of a room full of them, after being broken up with sledge hammers when the program was abruptly terminated.

      T-drive is a system consisting of a transversally located inline engine, a transmission, and associated packaging. It was designed by Ford in approximately the 1990 timeframe and shown in several auto shows and to magazines. Ultimately, it was abandoned due to several reasons. Ford went ahead with the "modular" V-6, V-8, VB-10, and V-12 engine families instead.

      The T-Drive engine was literally t-shaped - the transmission was located in the middle of the engine instead of the end. This allows easy and compact placement in small spaces. Due to the tight spacing of the cylinder bores, engines were possible from 4 to 8 cylinders. And T-Drive was designed from the start as a DOHC engine, state-of-the-art at that time. Because the technology was entirely consistent across the board, any new technology could be applied to the entire range of engines quickly.

      Engine output was never discussed. However, there are no reasons why it wouldn't be exactly the same as a conventional engine. Displacement was apparently 2, 3.2, and 4 liters (4, 6, and 8 cylinders).

      Ford Engineers:

      -Don Carriere, Principal Research Engineer
      -Ansel Flanery, Senior Research Engineer.

      Advantages:
      Family approach to a range of engines
      -Because of the size of the engine, and placement ahead of the axle centerline, front-, all-, or rear-wheel drive configurations could be engineered
      -Rear-wheel drive could have used variations of existing off-the-shelf transmissions (saving money).
      -Packaging advantages for "cab-forward" design.
      -The transmission is located in-line with the midpoint of the crankshaft. This allows for a very low engine placement, and correspondingly low hoodline
      -Marketing: provide Ford with centerpiece engine technology, as Subaru has with it's boxer engine family.

      Problems:
      -Packaging, NVH, durability.
      -Harmonics, torque pulse and gear rattle.
      -Limited bore size (torque, breathing, valve area) and displacement.
      -Engine weight over front axle-line, creating weigh-balance issues as in a front-wheel drive car
      -Front- or all-wheel drive would have required engineering variations on existing transmissions.
      -Bulky transmission placement behind the engine - requiring specific design changes on existing front-wheel drive-based platforms.
      This is the most outrageous example of T-Drive: a V-8 Tempo.
      Yes, a 4 liter V-8 Tempo.


      Note the DOHC inline-8.
      The test car didn't have room for a conventional braking assist system - note the two reservoirs hung off the strut brace.

      Judging from the patent text, this was at a minimum a front wheel drive car. It's not known if there was a take-off for a driveshaft to the rear, making it an AWD car. The patent does allow for that.

      You'll note that on both of these engines, there is a gap in the middle of the engine where the drivetrain take-off was engineered.


      This is a FOX-chassis T-Bird, with a 6-cylinder T-drive engine.
      The engine is transverse, possibly leading to an unfavorable weight balance.



      The rest of the driveline is conventional rear wheel drive. This car was probably built to demonstrate use of the near-off-the-shelf driveline.
      Note that the engine takes up the full engine bay - not the radiator placement (normally very far-forward in a FOX T-Bird).
      Last edited by Geechie_Suede; 08-20-2012 at 08:20 AM.
      Previously Owned: 96 LR Disco SD/65 Corvair Monza/93 Corolla Wagon DX/89 LeSabre Limited/96 Camry LE/99 Regal GS/95 Accord EX/98 CSVT/90 LS400/89 Supra N/A/91 Legacy SS
      Current: 2001 Ford Crown Victoria PI

    18. Member JCT's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 1st, 2012
      Location
      indianapolis
      Posts
      372
      Vehicles
      05 scion xA
      08-20-2012 08:14 AM #18
      Quote Originally Posted by MCTB View Post
      What is this?
      http://www.drivingenthusiast.net/sec...ve/default.htm

    19. Member
      Join Date
      Mar 18th, 2011
      Posts
      4,647
      Vehicles
      2011 DB GTI DSG 2 Door
      08-20-2012 09:57 AM #19
      Mercedes 300 SLR



    20. Member nismo4life's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 14th, 2007
      Location
      CT
      Posts
      2,004
      Vehicles
      '06 Cooper S (#squaresidewallcrew), LS400 drift car
      08-20-2012 10:39 AM #20
      Quote Originally Posted by RacingManiac View Post
      Mercedes 300 SLR


      Yo lo apruebo.

      Quote Originally Posted by Ocean City PD View Post
      (ie....red light challenges, running over the hood of police cars etc.) Yes we watch youtube also....
      '09 Honda Ruckus

    21. Get Off My Lawn!!! vwlarry's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 16th, 1999
      Location
      Seaford DE
      Posts
      29,529
      Blog Entries
      1
      Vehicles
      '05 Camry XLE
      08-20-2012 11:28 AM #21
      I was too little to remember it, but my grandma and grandpa had a '52 Pontiac Catalina with straight-8 power when I was born. I have some pictures of the car. Pontiac, in fact was the last carmaker to offer inline-8 engines, up until 1954. The carmaker was late into the V8 revolution among the American makers, but they massaged their old straight-8 with postwar tech, and offered the highest compression-ratios ever seen on such engines, which raised their output to competitive levels. The engines were just too long, heavy, and inefficient though to keep up with the ultra-modern new OHV V8s coming from all the makers, even the independents like Packard, Nash and Studebaker.



      Grandma and Grandpa traded the Catalina for a new '56 Pontiac Star Chief, with the all-new 287 cubic-inch OHV Pontiac V8 engine and Hydramatic. I remember that car v. well, since Grandma had it into the sixties, and we used it to drive from our home in NW Indiana to Arizona for our summer vacation several summers running, since it was faster and roomier than my dad's Ford.

      Do you enjoy old cars and long-winded stories about them? If your answer is "yes", then you might enjoy my blogpage. Try it here: http://vwlarry.blogspot.com . Leave a comment, too; I love feedback! Thanx for reading.

      “To avoid criticism say nothing, do nothing, be nothing.” - Aristotle

    22. Member
      Join Date
      Jul 12th, 2010
      Location
      Olympia, Washington
      Posts
      955
      Vehicles
      2006 Honda S2000, 85 jetta
      08-20-2012 11:51 AM #22
      Quote Originally Posted by vwlarry View Post
      The carmaker was late into the V8 revolution among the American makers, but they massaged their old straight-8 with postwar tech, and offered the highest compression-ratios ever seen on such engines, which raised their output to competitive levels.
      Thanks, Larry:

      Compression on the "eight" started at 5.7 - 1 initially, and was increased to 6.2 - 1 ratio in 1934. In 1940 it was increased again to 6.5 - 1. From 1952 to 1954 two compression ratios were specified, 6.8-1 with syncromesh (manual) transmission, and 7.7-1 ratio with Hydra-Matic (automatic) transmission. The engine had a remarkably low idle speed of a 450 rpm with standard transmission and 375 rpm (while in drive) for the automatic;
      Quote Originally Posted by Billy Kelton
      The difference between being in a relationship and being in prison is that in prisons they let you play softball on the weekends
      Quote Originally Posted by Tom Cotter
      There was an old woman that lived in a shoe. She had so many children, she didn't know what to do. How about you quit screwing, ya hosebag!

    23. Member Chris_V's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 18th, 2009
      Location
      Pikesville, MD
      Posts
      12,845
      Vehicles
      2013 Chevy Volt, 2011 Mini Cooper, '02 Suburban 2500LT
      08-20-2012 12:26 PM #23
      One of my favorite inline 8s, the Stutz DV32 DOHC, 4 valve per cyl aluminum unit:



      The starting point for the Stutz's DOHC entry was the Vertical Eight, a design credited to a veteran automotive engineer named Charles O. Greuter. The eight, designed while "Pop" Greuter was working at the Excelsior Motor Company in Chicago, featured a single overhead camshaft, nine main bearings, a crossflow cylinder head with two valves per cylinder and dual ignition, making it powerful and smooth.

      Greuter's eight came to the attention of Frederick E. Moskovics, who had been brought in to rescue a stumbling Stutz in 1925. Moskovics took Greuter aboard, and set him to work adapting the engine for a racy new model, to be called the Series AA. The major change in the engine's design was the use of a "silent" chain to power the camshaft, rather than a vertical shaft and noisy bevel gears. The original Vertical Eight wrung 92 horsepower from its 287 cubic inches, excellent by the standards of the day.

      The ultimate development of the Vertical Eight arrived in the spring of 1931. The new engine's name, DV-32, was a reference to its dual overhead camshafts and total of 32 valves, four per cylinder. The dual valves increased the engine's breathing capacity by 60 percent, while allowing each spark plug to be centrally located, for better flame propagation. With a displacement of 322 cubic inches, the DV-32 produced a heady 156 horsepower at 3,900 RPM, just 5 horsepower less than the heavier and more complex L-head V-12s from Lincoln and Packard, and 20 less than Cadillac's overhead-valve V-16. The single-cam version of the eight, now called the SV-16, was still available, and was conservatively rated at 113hp at 3,300 RPM.
      I love cars, but the problem is they are like schroedinger's hobby. They're always in a quantum superstate of being both awesome and a huge waste of time and money... until observation momentarily forces them into one state or another.

    24. Banned Hurt's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2011
      Location
      Boston, MA
      Posts
      3,845
      Vehicles
      1998 Jetta GT, 1998 GTI 2.0, 2012 GLI, 2012 GTI
      08-20-2012 01:00 PM #24
      Straight 8 TT in a miata plz

    25. Banned
      Join Date
      Mar 8th, 2011
      Location
      Bellevue Hospital Center
      Posts
      8,720
      08-20-2012 05:21 PM #25
      I8? Pfft, didn't you hear? The next Porsche is gunna have a VR8.

    26. Member GrayMarauder's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 8th, 2008
      Location
      SL,UT
      Posts
      2,216
      Vehicles
      1973 Saab 96, 1989 Saab 900 SPG, 2008 Saab Turbo-x Sportcombi
      08-20-2012 05:26 PM #26
      I'm not well versed enough to know anything about these.. But I am curious, what are the pros and cons of having an 8 in a inline verses a V?

      Does it constitute why we don't see them at all anymore?

    27. Member WRXGuy's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 20th, 2002
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      1,249
      Vehicles
      2012 GTI
      08-20-2012 06:08 PM #27
      Quote Originally Posted by GrayMarauder View Post
      I'm not well versed enough to know anything about these.. But I am curious, what are the pros and cons of having an 8 in a inline verses a V?

      Does it constitute why we don't see them at all anymore?
      Easy -- major reason is packaging -- an I8 is *HUGE*-- length and height. They're monsters. A V8 is lighter (in general), more compact, and is easier to cram in most anything.

    28. Member -DWM-'s Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 16th, 2006
      Location
      Chicagoland
      Posts
      1,268
      Vehicles
      car
      08-20-2012 06:24 PM #28
      Quote Originally Posted by GrayMarauder View Post
      I'm not well versed enough to know anything about these.. But I am curious, what are the pros and cons of having an 8 in a inline verses a V?

      Does it constitute why we don't see them at all anymore?
      Pros:
      -Awesome
      -Torque
      Cons:
      -very, very long.
      I wish I had a cool car.

    29. Member SciroccoOhio's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 10th, 2010
      Location
      Columbus Ohio
      Posts
      143
      Vehicles
      1985 VW SCIROCCO 1983 SCIROCCO WOLFSBURG 1961 VW BEETLE
      08-20-2012 07:11 PM #29
      The 240sx in the 3rd video belongs to one of my neighbors. Its the McMeekin brothers racing car. Its no longer a straight 8 but still bad ass!
      Quote Originally Posted by King View Post
      I was going to lock this, but the garbage truck gif has me wanting to give it another chance. I giggled.

    30. Member
      Join Date
      Feb 2nd, 2000
      Location
      BelgiëBelgique
      Posts
      5,156
      Vehicles
      car less
      08-20-2012 07:14 PM #30
      The straight-eight engine or inline-eight engine is an eight-cylinder internal combustion engine with all eight cylinders mounted in a straight line along the crankcase. The type has been produced in side-valve, overhead-valve, sleeve-valve and overhead-cam configurations.

      A straight-8 can be timed for inherent primary and secondary balance, with no unbalanced primary or secondary forces or moments. However, crankshaft torsional vibration, present to some degree in all engines, is sufficient to require the use of a harmonic damper at the accessory end of the crankshaft. Without such damping, fatigue cracking near the rear main bearing journal may occur, leading to engine failure.

      Although an inline six cylinder engine can also be timed for inherent primary and secondary balance, a straight-8 develops more power strokes per revolution and, as a result, will run more smoothly under load than an inline six. Also, due to the even number of power strokes per revolution, the straight-8 does not produce unpleasant odd-order harmonic vibration in the vehicle's driveline at low engine speeds.

      The smooth running characteristics of the straight-8 made it popular in luxury and racing cars of the past. However, the engine's length demanded the use of a long engine compartment, making the basic design unacceptable in modern vehicles. Also, due to the length of the engine, torsional vibration in both crankshaft and camshaft can adversely affect reliability and performance at high speeds. In particular, a phenomenon referred to as "crankshaft whip," caused by the effects of centrifugal force on the crank throws at high engine rpm, could cause physical contact between the connecting rods and crankcase walls, leading to the engine's destruction. As a result, the design has been displaced almost completely by the shorter and sturdier V8 engine configuration.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straight-eight_engine
      VR stands for Vee and Reihe - or a Vee-shaped Inline engine. It's an Inline engine in operational terms (it works mechanically like a straight engine) with a slight offset of the cylinders in an alternating fashion - mirrored by a slight offset of the cranks. Similar to the Ferrari 65° V12 (which is two L6 sharing a crankshaft) which has a 5° offset between the L6es from a regular 60° V12 to make it flatter. This is purely a packaging solution (in the case of the VR6 and derivatives).

      The VR engine is shorter than a regular L6 because the offset allows the cylinders to be moved closer together. It's also narrower than a V6.

      And no - there will be no VR8 - which would in fact be a straight 8. And yes the W16 can be seen as two VR8s and is in fact a V16 with a slight offset of the crankshaft handles - as I call them.

      The cool bit about the VR engines is the way a single camshaft operates the valves of two offset rows of cylinders.

      The lesser bit is heat exchange because one row of intakes is flanked by the cylinders of the other row.

      Though a neat mechanical solution to look at - I think all VR engines will be fazed out eventually because there no real efficiency benefit while it must be a giant hassle for VAG to make all the newest developments fit this pretty complicated hybrid configuration.

      Just have to get people to think V8Turbos are as fancy as W12s - or just put the gearbox in front of the engine so you don't have to make your V12s so short.

      4cyl Turbos already replaced the VR6 mostly - if I'm not mistaken - mostly.

      -me







    31. Member Iroczgirl's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 17th, 2007
      Location
      Bend, OR
      Posts
      18,982
      Vehicles
      '55 Ford 351C, '80 Rabbit AAZ
      08-20-2012 08:27 PM #31
      I love straight 8's. Combined with a really heavy flywheel they run almost without any vibration. I've always felt the Packard straight 8's to be the smoothest.
      Lots of VW stuff|Rare Scirocco parts!
      The family: '55 Ford 351C, '70 TR6 262Olds, '80 Rabbit AAZ, '84 C30 350, '97 Hardbody KA24E, '01 TJ 150AMC.

    32. Member BattleRabbit's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 28th, 2007
      Location
      Albany, NY
      Posts
      7,538
      Vehicles
      DKW Munga
      08-20-2012 09:24 PM #32
      Any person who can honestly say "I've always felt the Packard was the smoothest" from experience, starts off with an "ok" in my book.

      Right on, IrocZGirl.

      I have a bit of a bias towards the nine main-bearing eights from the pre-war Studebaker President, but then I come from a Studebaker household.
      1998 VW Golf Mk.III 5dr/1989 Saab 900 Sedan/1960 Porsche 356B T5/1980 Honda CM400E

    33. Member
      Join Date
      Jan 23rd, 2011
      Location
      N. IL
      Posts
      1,539
      Vehicles
      01 Suburban 8.1L 07 Outback
      08-20-2012 09:31 PM #33
      One of the cons I remember reading about is crankshaft deflection was an issue due to a large flywheel and just the huge long cranks shaft itself.

    34. Member JJS119's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 25th, 2008
      Location
      New York City
      Posts
      930
      Vehicles
      2013 Passat SE 2.5, 1998 Wrangler 2.5 4x4
      08-20-2012 09:52 PM #34
      If you want to talk Straight-8's, lets talk about the best Straight-8 built. The Buick Straight-8 aka the Fireball 8 built from 1931 to 1953. My father had a Fireball 8 in his black 1949 Buick Dynaflow. He had it when I was 5 years old and to this day I still remember the power and smoothness of that car/motor. My father sold that car when I was 5, and it is still driving around today. 60+ years without any a motor rebuild. I just was on the phone with him and he says he needs to buy that car back from the guy he sold it to. And my father only says that when he means it. I see some Straight-8ness in my future.

      Some Buick Straight-8 information for those who do not know about: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buick_Straight-8_engine

      And a picture of my a Dynaflow similar to my fathers because this post brought back good memories.


      Quote Originally Posted by Captain 'Murica! View Post
      I'd rather have AIDS than a diesel station wagon.

    35. Member Snake Hips's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 15th, 2012
      Location
      Denver, CO
      Posts
      285
      Vehicles
      1995 Audi S6
      08-21-2012 12:26 AM #35
      Quote Originally Posted by AuForm View Post
      With the size of that MF-er, if you put this in black and white you'd make a convincing photo of a dude building a WWII aircraft engine!

    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •