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    Thread: Every time someone says the Corrado is a future classic...as story

    1. Member Pf3il's Avatar
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      08-31-2012 08:43 AM #101
      #COTD

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      08-31-2012 08:52 AM #102
      Quote Originally Posted by Fe2O3 View Post
      Was the reliability of a stock well-maintained Corrado really off-the-charts-bad?
      "well-maintained" for a Corrado means "the supercharger got rebuilt". That is an awful lot of maintenance for a car.
      Call To Order Pizza But Too Shy To Answer The Door When It Arrives Crew

    3. Member masa8888's Avatar
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      08-31-2012 08:53 AM #103
      Quote Originally Posted by VDub2625 View Post
      I also don't understand how they are less reliable than a Golf (besides the G60 s/c). .
      Blame Karmann

    4. Senior Member JustinCSVT's Avatar
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      08-31-2012 09:00 AM #104
      Quote Originally Posted by boner View Post
      \
      those 100k mustangs are absolute sh!t. the only reason they get so much money is cuz the stupid baby boomers now have a bunch of money and they are trying to reclaim some of their youth. kids of the 90s i think are a bit more objective.
      GTFO. If you think the Supra won't be commanding some ridiculous price in the futures as well as the 993 in any version, you have to be kidding yourself. There's others in that category too.

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      08-31-2012 09:07 AM #105
      It sounds like owning a Corrado is like dating a prolific nymphomaniac.
      No matter how fast and pretty they are, you eventually become tired of getting ****ed.
      “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”

    6. Member freedomgli's Avatar
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      08-31-2012 09:09 AM #106
      Quote Originally Posted by flytech78 View Post
      I skipped the whole corrado bug and went for the mk2 were i also throw money at it and at the end i had 15k worth of parts car that i could barley get 4k for.
      What did you expect? I mean, really? About 6 years ago I bought a $1900 Miata, spent about $10k in various upgrades, modifications, repairs, maintenance and general refurbishment. Today that car is worth maybe $4k on a good day and I'm nowhere close to where I want the car to be in terms of style, condition, performance, etc. Give me another $15k and it'll finally match my vision of what it ought to be.

      Refurbishing and modifying old cars almost never makes financial sense. It is a hobby and your personal budget should list it as a hobby expense, not a transportation expense. You should drive a "normal" car for your basic transportation needs. The "fun" car is just for fun.

    7. 08-31-2012 09:09 AM #107
      so are you saying those $1.5-2.5K ones that pop up on craigslist from time to time would be a bad idea?

      because i want one. not as a daily though, more of a toy.

    8. Senior Member 6cylVWguy's Avatar
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      08-31-2012 09:15 AM #108
      Quote Originally Posted by Fe2O3 View Post
      Was the reliability of a stock well-maintained Corrado really off-the-charts-bad?
      Most in this thread have no clue because either A) they have limited if any experience with corrados or B) they only know corrados after a bunch of mods have been done to them.

      When I bought my car it was 100% bone stock, down to the original Eagle GA tires that came on it back in 1994. So yeah, I probably should have just kept it that way. And for about 20k miles miles, I did just that. It was a spectacular car in how it would just eat up highway miles---it was such a stable highway car compared with anything else in its class when it was new. But like everyone who still owned these cars in the late 90's through, say, 2005, I felt the need to mod the car. Unlike the guy a few posts up, who felt that he had to spend 10's of thousands of dollars to keep up with the Jones', a few key mods will really wake the car up and still roughly maintain the reliability. Most people who owned these cars in the later years were kids who simply didn't or couldn't afford to do things the right way, and yet, they still insisted on modding their cars. The cars ran like crap, likely made less hp than they could have if done right, and yet the owners still beat the hell out of the cars. You tell me, does that sound like a recipe for reliability for any car?

      I have no delusions that my car can keep up with a stock Evo, but that was never the point to me. I tried to do it as right as I could--either doing it myself or enlisting the highest quality people I could afford to do the job. I've almost always been happy with the work and over 12 years, the car has very rarely let me down. But most people would simply walk past my car because it's not flashy and it doesn't have every possible performance mod thrown at it, which was and probably still is, the way to get any respect in the "tuning" scene. And yet, very few of these guys ever drove their cars hard---I mean road course hard, not on some back roads. And those guys who did, usually ended up flat bedding their cars home. If you're going to pretend to be some heavy hitter and maintain reliability, you're basically going to have to re-engineer the car. Throwing on a mkIV headgasket and using some forged internal parts isn't going to get you far by itself.

      I keep the corrado because it's fun. Period. My mustang, as it sits stock, could likely throw both my corrado as it sits now and any stock Evo (at least if you go by lightning lap times) a pretty decent beating on most road courses. But in some ways, what I like about the mustang is the same thing that I like about the corrado---it's a blank canvas and noticably flawed in certain areas from the factory. The current mustangs are far less flawed, IMO, than anything that came before them though and that is the main reason why I own one. I don't need a second project car. A little suspension work and if I end up doing track days, an oil cooler. Boom, done.

    9. Member freedomgli's Avatar
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      08-31-2012 09:19 AM #109
      Quote Originally Posted by robhurlburt View Post
      so are you saying those $1.5-2.5K ones that pop up on craigslist from time to time would be a bad idea?

      because i want one. not as a daily though, more of a toy.
      Are you asking about the Corrado or the Miata?

      If you're asking about Miata, then it really depends on what you're after. But my view is that for every person that lucks into a steal of a deal on an old Miata with the matching hard top, all records, lovingly maintained, etc. there are 500 examples that have about $3k in immediate needs due to deferred maintenance. And then you can easily spend another $5k on suspension, wheels and tires alone to make it the back road/ auto-x/ HPDE joy that everyone thinks it is. And even then you'll still have a relatively slow car with all the wear and tear typical of a 10-20 year old cheap commuter car. Most of those cheap Miatas are very well and truly used up and in need of a rolling restoration at a minimum. Not to say they can't be fun, but they really need to be refreshed. About 10 years ago the Mazda factory in Japan even offered an official "Roadster Refresh" program. Click here for more details.

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      08-31-2012 09:21 AM #110
      Had a 1990 G60, no sunroof or ABS, it was the best/worst 3 years of my life

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      08-31-2012 09:32 AM #111
      Quote Originally Posted by Dan92SLC View Post
      I went through all of the Corrado 'stations of the cross'.
      To a recovering catholic school kid like me thats gold. Gold Jerry !!

      Quote Originally Posted by mike02467 View Post
      Yeah, Shampoo as a lube is probably one of the worst pains of my life.
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      Last edited by MAC; 08-31-2012 at 09:40 AM.
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    12. 08-31-2012 09:42 AM #112
      Quote Originally Posted by freedomgli View Post
      Are you asking about the Corrado or the Miata?

      If you're asking about Miata, then it really depends on what you're after. But my view is that for every person that lucks into a steal of a deal on an old Miata with the matching hard top, all records, lovingly maintained, etc. there are 500 examples that have about $3k in immediate needs due to deferred maintenance. And then you can easily spend another $5k on suspension, wheels and tires alone to make it the back road/ auto-x/ HPDE joy that everyone thinks it is. And even then you'll still have a relatively slow car with all the wear and tear typical of a 10-20 year old cheap commuter car. Most of those cheap Miatas are very well and truly used up and in need of a rolling restoration at a minimum. Not to say they can't be fun, but they really need to be refreshed. About 10 years ago the Mazda factory in Japan even offered an official "Roadster Refresh" program. Click here for more details.
      corrado's.

      http://dayton.craigslist.org/cto/3216023783.html

    13. 08-31-2012 09:44 AM #113
      Quote Originally Posted by a2a4raddo View Post
      They wont be classic's in the sense that an E30 M3 will be. But they have a Colt following, and will be a future classic amongst the VW Crowd. Especially bone stock pristine SLC's (if they still exist).
      I think I found one,today interestingly enough. Went to get a rim mounted on my GTI today at a local tire shop, and some older guy in a BMW 335i came up to me and mentioned he has a Corrado he has owned since brand new. Turns out it was this burgundy color Corrado VR6 I've seen driving in my area since high school (Since 2005), so far it sounds like it was daily driven with 150k miles on it.

      It never really crossed my mind but a one owner all original Corrado is really tempting me, always seem to find these one owner cars that are all stock. I just dont know if I can do it, I already have one potential future headche in the mk6 gti But I have a lot of friends who can help with maintenance, etc

      But era of VW's scare me because of past experiences with a Eurovan.
      Last edited by Aw614; 08-31-2012 at 09:54 AM.

    14. 08-31-2012 09:52 AM #114
      Quote Originally Posted by LBSOHK View Post
      its crazy to think a 20+ year old car wont give you any issues...
      Except that this was when the car was 10 years old...and these cars had these problems well before that. Nobody should have to hire a troupe of pygmy monkeys to crawl into the dash to replace the heater core of a 4 year old car with less than 50k miles. Somewhere in the world there has to be a wailing wall with a list of Corrado owners' names on it that have suffered immeasurably. There's a one-owner '93 SLC in town here that has 23k on it. The owner refuses to sell it despite the fact that she's had it in the shop 73 times since owning it. She says it's the prettiest thing she's ever owned and even though she can't enjoy driving it, it looks great in her garage. That's a true story. I was even stupid enough to try to persuade her to sell it to me.

      But the point isn't the fact they're problematic. They're just not great cars. They don't perform particularly well in stock form and they are often times worse when modified. The Scirocco has an infinitely better chance at being considered a classic because it survived for more than 1 generation.

    15. Member U. A. V.'s Avatar
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      08-31-2012 09:58 AM #115
      Good read.
      I've owned 3 Corrados, 1st was a G60 and the last 2 were VR6s. I just sold my third and last one a few months ago. Not gonna lie, I miss the sound, the lines and shape of the car was sexy and timeless but it was time to move on. It also turned heads, it's not a common car you see here so people didn't know what it was and all they hear is the growl of the VR. There was nothing else to do to make it more fun and I was dumping alot of money to make it 'new' again so I sold it.

      BUT I think I would've kept the Rado VR if it was RWD.

    16. Moderator Krazee's Avatar
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      08-31-2012 10:05 AM #116
      Quote Originally Posted by HeadlinerG60 View Post
      ...As a former Corrado aficionado, I often thought the car was a tremendous driver and a surefire classic…

      To preface this story, I was raised in a family that was staunchly against owning “normal” cars. The Datsun 280z was as close to normal as my parents’ garage would be. They had a myriad of Jaguars, Alfa Romeos, MGs and even a Delorean. My first car purchase was a Merkur XR4ti that I spent the greater portion of my high school life working for in order to buy Sierra Cosworth goodies for it. I eventually inherited a pair of XJ6s and an XJS v12 coupe and worked every waking hour outside of school to pay for gas, insurance and maintenance. As nice as those cars were, I quite nearly broke my neck when I saw a Corrado for the very first time. I swooned over its swollen arches and sweet swooping backside that ended abruptly. It was quirky – the perfect combination of sexy and cute that would get Steve Carell laid.

      After numerous years of lusting over it as a new car during my high school years, I finally procured my own in 2002 after a lengthy search. I had been contemplating over a 944 Turbo and a 914 for quite some time when I simply gave up and settled on satisfying my Corrado urges. The example I bought was OK. It was complete. It was stock and it had a stunning blue on blue combo that would’ve made an ‘80s K car jealous. Every little switch worked – even the moon roof. It even came with a stack of receipts for maintenance. It even made 380 mile drive home without a hiccup. Oh, by the way, it was a G60 model. I know, you’re thinking why the G60? Why not the plush and upscale VR6 model? Why risk the headache? Because I wanted the car that I fell in love with back when a Bulls championship seemed nearly impossible. I had achieved an automotive milestone and bought the car I lusted after. And it sucked.

      The morning after driving it home, the car wouldn’t start. The battery was drained by the faulty automatic seatbelt relay. People in the late ‘80s/early ‘90s were too stupid to put their seatbelts on so the cars had to do it for them. The problem in the Corrado was that it also meant having your head busted open as you entered the car. Open the door; squat and fall into the car cut your head open on the seatbelt. That’s only the beginning of the rewarding driving experience the car offered. Being a front-wheel drive “sports coupe/hatch”, it had the typical under steer issues. Take a corner hard and throttle through and you could enjoy a push towards the wrong side of the shoulder. The steering feel was OK, but only in the same way your brother-in-law smacking your kid is OK. The shifter felt lost. Like when you have an errant dryer sheet in the leg of your pants. Except that dryer sheet isn’t a dryer sheet at all; it’s a pair of your wife’s panties that you pull out of the leg of your pants just as you’ve sat down in a meeting. You don’t know where to put it. It’s awkward.

      And then it gets better. Things start to break, as you’d expect on an older car. Except they’d break while you were sleeping, or watching Cinemax at 2am with the volume set at 2 as to not wake the children. Imagine waking up to a garage floor full of coolant as you set out to go to work, or wonder why the crankshaft pulley is dancing about the engine bay after you turn the key over. And then the spoiler stops working so you can’t show the person that you’re passing in the slow lane that you’re driving faster than they. Then the engine eats a spark plug and bounces it around like someone trying to figure out where to go in City Hall.

      So then you realize this car drives like a brick in slush and needs improvement, so you start modifying it. The engine gets rebuilt; the ECU gets remapped with Heiankyo Alien for Gameboy, and a more robust supercharger finds its way into the bay. The car gets lowered and stiffened which only amplifies the head splitting entering and exiting game and the entire interior gets updated with leather from a VR car. Fresh paint, bigger brakes, updated lighting and wheels create a stunning package. So then you have the VW equivalent of Emma Stone with rampant diarrhea. So you’ve spent $14K for a car that looks great, drives like a BBQ grill being thrown off your back deck and defecates fluid everywhere for no reason whatsoever.

      And I’ve driven more than a dozen VR versions and more than a dozen G60 models since then. And they’re all awful. I don’t care what you say. They look good, sure, but they’re ripe with enough annoying problems that they aren’t worth the headache. So every time someone asks what car they think was under-appreciated or will be a future classic, some chucklehead says the Corrado and they post a pic of it. Then three other chuckleheads agree and only one chucklehead has ever actually driven one but one of them has a non-running “project car” Corrado sitting in their garage…and it will be there for the next 8 years because parts are expensive and 12 out of 8 people are broke and then they will sell it and buy a MKIV with a quarter of a million miles but buy rims for it that cost more than their annual income…I mean, that’s the scene. And at the end of their life they’ll finally realize that what they really regret more than anything besides using shampoo for lube in the shower is that they really wanted a Porsche 944 Turbo and they settled for a Corrado.
      While entertaining to read, your comments can easily be attributed to any car of the same generation from a multitude of manufacturers. Nothing from the 1990s, save for possibly Hondas, was virtually bullet proof and not prone to some problems. Quite frankly, the G60 was a half-hearted execution, and its wiring gaffes were none different than a mk2 GTI, but for some reason that car lives are a handling legend - nevermind that the Corrado can and did run circles around it.

      Having owned two, with my current one at the tail-end of a now 6 year build, all of my current issues are due to not choosing to leave the car 100% stock, or at least with just a basic lower kit. There was nothing wrong with my wiring, and yet I opted for an OBD2 conversion. There was nothing wrong with the factory brake system, and yet I opted for the system from the 96+ VR6s. The stock brakes were more than adequate, but I saw fit to purchase a ridiculously large set of Wilwoods for the front and rear. All my issues are my own doing, and of no fault of the car.

      The Corrado VR6, and virtually all VR6 cars of the generation are surprisingly simple. The go together quite easily, with minimal wiring, and everything is straight forward. To compare a 1994 or later car to a modern R32 is plain stupid, not to mention that you would have preferred to own a Porsche 944, and yet those were laden with their own collection of issues, one of which being a weak transmission that cause 3rd gear to pop out...which of course was the best gear to be in to take advantage of that turbo charged engine.

      As car enthusiasts, we hold some brands and some models above others. Why? Because we are enthusiasts, border lining on masochists, and as such see everything through rose colored glasses. Why do I lust after an R34 GT-R, when by the time I can legally import it, parts will be even HARDER to find and driving right-handed in a left-hand country will most likely be a comical learning experience? Why do I covet an Integra Type R, and E30 M3, or even and original Mini? Or what about the more obscure fascinations, such as a first generation Taurus SHO, wrapped in matte black vinyl just so I can emulate Robocop?

      We, as a automotive enthusiast collective, seem quite troubled by the Corrado, and similar vintage VWs, and yet the beloved E36 M3 and E39 M5 get a pass despite needing a complete cooling system overhaul at a paltry sum of 50,000miles. Or how about the M5 and its need for a new clutch, at again 50,000miles, because the worshipped BMW thought the stock 540i clutch could deal with an extra 120hp? Is the much-loved Porsche 993 really THAT durable? Doesn't even the basic of maintenance require engine removal?

      Fact is, in its heyday, the Corrado was the fastest VW, the best handling, and with few compromises.
      Project Corrado RS: Keep Up
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    17. 08-31-2012 10:08 AM #117
      The ending of the story: This was the last time I ever drove the car:





      I spent the entire afternoon cruising through the hills nervously watching the temp gauge and oil temp as I tried to keep pace with the group of R32s and 1.8T emkaywhatevers that convinced me to take the car on a 200 mile cruise. It pushed through corners, fighting for traction. It didn't have big enough lungs to hang on straightaways with the porkier VWs. But everyone said it looked fantastic. Surprisingly, it didn't break down. It actually got me home. And just as I pulled it into the garage I heard a pop. Then it smelled like bad PF Changs. My wife pulled into the second bay in the R32 and literally said, "HA!" and I climbed up and out of the car to see more coolant gushing out.

      So I did what any honest person would do that finally had enough. $14k into the car was my breaking point. So I GAVE THE CAR AWAY. Free. I just couldn't stomach the thought of it keeping someone else awake at night. And 5 years later, the car is still sitting in the yard of the person who claimed. Still not running. Looks fantastic though! Classic!

    18. Member freedomgli's Avatar
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      08-31-2012 10:09 AM #118
      Quote Originally Posted by HeadlinerG60 View Post
      The Scirocco has an infinitely better chance at being considered a classic because it survived for more than 1 generation.
      You know that the Corrado is really just a 3rd generation Scirocco with a different name, right?

    19. 08-31-2012 10:10 AM #119
      Quote Originally Posted by freedomgli View Post
      You know that the Corrado is really just a 3rd generation Scirocco with a different name, right?
      I think that's obvious. That's the joke.jpg

    20. Member freedomgli's Avatar
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      08-31-2012 10:12 AM #120
      Quote Originally Posted by HeadlinerG60 View Post
      Nobody should have to hire a troupe of pygmy monkeys to crawl into the dash to replace the heater core of a 4 year old car with less than 50k miles.
      The heater core issue is a well-known safety defect addressed by a safety recall. It was not unique to the Corrado. It was an issue on the same vintage Golf and Jetta (no surprise there). Do you mean to tell me there still isn't a decent solution to the heater core reliability problem?

    21. 08-31-2012 10:13 AM #121
      Please tell me you aren't taking all of this seriously. That's completely missing the point...

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      08-31-2012 10:14 AM #122
      Quote Originally Posted by HeadlinerG60 View Post
      ...As a former Corrado aficionado, I often thought the car was a tremendous driver and a surefire classic…


      This post just intensifies how much I want a Corrado.

      But then again, I own a Rotary, and will own another Range Rover Classic.

      I are teh dumb.
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      08-31-2012 10:16 AM #123
      Quote Originally Posted by rynodyno312 View Post
      FWIW, the 944 turbo would have been a maintenance headache as well, and the parts would have been ridiculously expensive.
      owned my 944 turbo for two years now, never left me on the side of the road, or was unable to start in the morning. i daily it whenever possible.

      is it expensive in parts? yes. did it leave me stranded ... never.
      Quote Originally Posted by kwik!gti
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      08-31-2012 10:23 AM #124
      Quote Originally Posted by HeadlinerG60 View Post
      They're just not great cars. They don't perform particularly well in stock form and they are often times worse when modified. .
      Actually, they perform very very well in stock form relative to their contemporarys. If you look at up road tests...just about every single road test praised the Corrado SLC for its handling, driving dynamics, and its acceleration.

    25. 08-31-2012 10:30 AM #125
      But when your contemporaries are a bag of marshmallows, a jar of Goober Grape peanut butter and jelly and a can of Pepsi Clear, you kind of just win by default. Josta was the greatest chemical creation in the history of man and it's long been forgotten. RIP, Josta

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