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    Thread: To neuter or not to neuter

    1. 09-20-2012 06:56 PM #1
      Just kinda wondering if anyone on here perhaps with some actual knowledge can answer my question on this one. I'm trying to decide if I should neuter my 2 year old Pitbull. We are expecting our first child in about a month. Does anyone have any experience with doing this or do you think it would even help. Thanks

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      09-20-2012 07:25 PM #2
      I always opt for the neuter. Why risk adding more pups to the shelters. Plus removing the source of testosterone.
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      09-21-2012 10:11 AM #3
      Quote Originally Posted by new2me View Post
      I always opt for the neuter. Why risk adding more pups to the shelters. Plus removing the source of testosterone.
      x2. If you aren't planning on breeding the dog, neutering should be done, no question.
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    4. 09-21-2012 11:17 AM #4
      I actually really want to breed him atleast once but dont really have the time to find a good breeder to match him up with around here. My biggest thing is that I don't want to do it and then he is exactly the same way he is now, not that he is bad or anything, he just has his moments. That sounds alot worse than it really is. It's not like he is going around humping everything or anything like that, he just tends to get super excited for no reason for like a couple hours at a time. He is well exercised and gets to go for walks and all that, leash free too. I would regret doing it if he didn't mellow out a little bit, since I would like to breed him atleast once before getting him chopped. Maybe it is just a guy thing?


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      09-22-2012 12:44 PM #5
      Quote Originally Posted by Mk6-GLI View Post
      I actually really want to breed him atleast once
      Why? If the answer is just because, it is a stupid answer.

      Don't take this the wrong way, because I like Pitties, my dog (who is spayed, they wouldn't adopt her out of the shelter without it) enjoys playing with some of the neighborhood Pitties, and I always recommend checking them out when someone asks about adopting a dog, but shelters are overcapacity with pits and pit mixes that there is no reason to add to the population. If you had a rare breed, or it was a champion hunting dog, I could understand your sentiment, but breeding any dog 'just because you want to' is stupid.
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      09-23-2012 10:46 AM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by Mk6-GLI View Post
      I actually really want to breed him atleast once
      Please, please, please don't breed him. You have a beautiful dog, but as delta v says, pits are one the most over-represented breed in shelters and millions of dogs are already euthanized every year --- supply is already greater than demand. They are the breed most likely to have to be surrendered because of family issues (divorce, etc), financial problems (losing houses, moving), etc. Even the best intentioned owners run into these issues so there's a decent chance one of your pups is going to end up in a shelter at some point in its life. Once in shelters, they are the hardest dogs to adopt out. If you haven't done so yet, spend a day or two volunteering at a shelter and ask the staff about trying to adopt out pits.

      If it's because you want one of his puppies, please consider adopting a pit from a shelter instead. You'll be saving two lives --- that dogs life, and the life of the next dog who can stay at the shelter a little longer b/c of the new space created.

      There's a reason that EVERY group that works with dogs (well, aside from breeders and show groups) recommends spaying/neutering. Spend a little time on Pit Bull Rescue Center's section on why you should do it: http://www.pbrc.net/speuter3.html

      Last thought comes from this article: Dogs that bite are 6.2x more likely to be male and 2.6x more likely to be intact. With a pit, you have zero leeway. What I mean is, if your golden bites a kid in the neighborhood, you have an annoyed neighbor. That same thing happens with a pit and you're getting sued and your dog is getting put down. Why not do EVERYTHING you can to lessen the chances of that happening? Your dog may be perfect, but it really wouldn't be his 'fault' if someone got between him and in-heat female he was trying to get after --- especially if it was another dog.

      Quote Originally Posted by Mk6-GLI View Post
      but dont really have the time to find a good breeder to match him up with around here.
      Wait, honest question here --- do good breeders go around looking for stud dogs? I thought responsible breeders own both parents? I would never consider buying a dog, but if i did, I would want to meet both the parents (especially a pit).

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      09-23-2012 10:48 AM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by Mk6-GLI View Post
      My biggest thing is that I don't want to do it and then he is exactly the same way he is now, not that he is bad or anything, he just has his moments
      Think of it this way: if you do it and he's the same, he could have been MUCH worse if you hadn't done it.

      Also, you said he goes for leash free walks. Think of the potential disaster that could happen if you come across an intact female --- it only takes a second for an accidental litter to happen, and then you've got 8 pit-hound mixes that you're trying to sell for $200 on craigslist to recoup vet fees. And that's not even considering what would happen if someone gets in the way of stopping him from getting to a female in heat.

    8. 09-24-2012 11:32 AM #8
      I think you guys have me as someone who is just going to breed with some random breeder, there is a reason that he hasn't been breed already, believe me there have been numerous generous offers for breedings, but I am going to breed him through a good breeder, not some random no name breeder. He already plays with the neighbors kids and is super gentle with them, and the whole dog in heat thing is not a worry either. Neighbors dog has been in heat 2x since we moved here and no crazy ****nanagans yet when it comes to that. He is actually a super rare bloodline stateside, he is actual from a European blood line. He is a blue line from over in Germany, picked him up while I was in the service. I''ll find another picture that shows his size better

    9. 09-24-2012 11:56 AM #9
      Here is some more to show his size



    10. 09-24-2012 12:21 PM #10
      Just because he might be a good example doesn't mean it's a good idea to breed.

      Now, I don't know you personally, so don't take offense to this, but, when I've talked with people who say things like "He's such a good example of the breed" mixed with "I'm going to breed him just once", the reasons seem to be more selfish than anything. Not saying it's the case here, but you should truly question yourself.

      I'm not against keeping dogs intact, but for most dog owners it just makes the most sense to get them snipped. Not only can it tame some of their behavior, but you also wouldn't need to worry about certain health issues in relation to the testicles and the reproductive system as a whole.

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      09-25-2012 09:58 AM #11
      Quote Originally Posted by Mk6-GLI View Post
      I think you guys have me as someone who is just going to breed with some random breeder,
      I make no distinction ---- you're looking to contribute to the overpopulate problem of the most over-represented dog in shelters these days. Being more selective about who you stud him out to doesn't make a difference.

      There are so many pits in shelters that need amazing homes. They are amazing with kids, they are good with other dogs, and they will die in a cage because someone bought a dog instead of adopting one. I just don't see why a dog should die because it doesn't have some pseudo-pedigree.

      Seriously, spend some time volunteering at a shelter or with a pit rescue. It will break your heart and probably make you reconsider ever breeding him

    12. 09-25-2012 10:01 AM #12
      Have him neutered ASAP please. I'm sure he's a nice dog but that doesn't mean he should be bred.

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    13. 09-25-2012 03:44 PM #13
      Quote Originally Posted by GTiTOM View Post
      I make no distinction ---- you're looking to contribute to the overpopulate problem of the most over-represented dog in shelters these days. Being more selective about who you stud him out to doesn't make a difference.

      There are so many pits in shelters that need amazing homes. They are amazing with kids, they are good with other dogs, and they will die in a cage because someone bought a dog instead of adopting one. I just don't see why a dog should die because it doesn't have some pseudo-pedigree.

      Seriously, spend some time volunteering at a shelter or with a pit rescue. It will break your heart and probably make you reconsider ever breeding him
      I actually have done work with local shelters before, I truly enjoy spending time up there and understand what you are saying completely. My dog doesn't get loose or anything like that so it wouldn't be any irresponsible or unintentional breedings. However, I wasn't asking for an emotionally charged response due to the way you feel about breeding dogs and overpopulated shelters, I was asking opinions on behavioral changes post snip. Sorry to light a match on a hidden gas can but I was looking for a more behavioral response.

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      09-26-2012 08:25 AM #14
      Quote Originally Posted by Mk6-GLI View Post
      However, I wasn't asking for an emotionally charged response due to the way you feel about breeding dogs and overpopulated shelters, I was asking opinions on behavioral changes post snip. Sorry to light a match on a hidden gas can but I was looking for a more behavioral response.
      Sorry, not emotionally charged, just factual. You said you're trying to decide if you should neuter him, so you should really factor in everything, including what happens after the act

      But for behavioral changes, what are the potential downsides? Besides breeding him, is there any legitimate reason to not do it? Everything I've ever heard/read/seen is that it will have positive behavioral benefits ---- less chance of aggression, less humping, less dominance, etc. I've never heard anyone argue that their dog loses its personality or becomes less loyal or anything.


      Quote Originally Posted by Mk6-GLI View Post
      My dog doesn't get loose or anything like that so it wouldn't be any irresponsible or unintentional breedings.
      My point was that breeding is creating animals that you don't have control over. Within the next 10 years, there's a high probability one of those beautiful puppies ends up in a shelter. Or ends up being used for stud that produces puppies that end up in the shelter. Doesn't matter how responsible you are about it, since everything after the sperm donation is out of your control

      And sorry, but almost all breeding of pit bulls these days is irresponsible and simply adding to the problems the breed currently has

      Also, for shelter volunteering

    15. 09-26-2012 05:32 PM #15
      In regards to behavior: Things like roaming, marking and those seemingly uncontrollable bursts of energy can be tamed, but it's really a case-by-case basis. You don't really know until you do it.

      In regards to health: Like I said earlier, you snipping removes the chance of the dog developing certain things like testicular cancer.

      Let me put it this way: There are no down sides to neutering, except the obvious procedure and healing. But honestly, snipping the balls is an easy process and is not all that invasive. Spading tends to carry a bit more concern with the procedure.

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      10-01-2012 08:57 AM #16
      I have never seen neutering to make any significant changes in behavior. Unfortunately you are going to get personal opinions when posting in a public form. There are enough dogs that need homes, no reason to add to the long list.


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      10-12-2012 12:43 PM #17
      It's damn near impossible to find anything but pits in the shelters around here...
      Quote Originally Posted by Doug Butabi View Post
      I just want to know why OP thought making a thread in The Car Lounge would help him in any way... We've got a bunch of dudes telling him to "pepper his angus," and an insurance agent who just made a 2:30 appointment to **** someones wife. Classic TCL.

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      10-12-2012 03:57 PM #18
      Quote Originally Posted by Mk6-GLI View Post
      I actually have done work with local shelters before, I truly enjoy spending time up there and understand what you are saying completely. My dog doesn't get loose or anything like that so it wouldn't be any irresponsible or unintentional breedings. However, I wasn't asking for an emotionally charged response due to the way you feel about breeding dogs and overpopulated shelters, I was asking opinions on behavioral changes post snip. Sorry to light a match on a hidden gas can but I was looking for a more behavioral response.
      It only needs to happen once. So saying he's never, means nothing. Every night there's a story of a dog attack and the owner always says, "he's never done that before!"

      All of my JRTs have been beautiful representations of the breed. Two came from show dog bloodlines. All have been spayed or neutered. Never considered anything else. It's in their best up interest, it's in my best interests. There are plenty of people out there wanting to breed their dogs because they think they're perfect, that you don't need to as well.

      Especially with a child on the way. You really need to ask yourself, what's more important, continuing the bloodline of your dog, or the safety of your child? Dogs are unpredictable, and ANYTHING you can do to decrease any risk to your child, DO IT.
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      11-25-2012 01:19 PM #19
      Neuter. Are you willing to house any and all offspring for the rest of their lives? This is what it means to be a responsible breeder and I've known very few.

    20. 11-27-2012 12:26 PM #20
      Quote Originally Posted by CO Boy View Post
      I have never seen neutering to make any significant changes in behavior. Unfortunately you are going to get personal opinions when posting in a public form. There are enough dogs that need homes, no reason to add to the long list.

      Havent checked this one in a while, and someone finally gave a real insight not opinion. Thank you. and NO I didnt neuter him and baby is here and all the behavior I wanted him to stop magically stopped. He is super gentle with the baby(3 weeks old) and listens better than ever. So he will continue to keep his nuts.

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      11-28-2012 09:20 AM #21
      Neutering and behavior are not tied together. It's an old wives tale that a neutered dog will be better behaved. All I've seen is less marking, depending on when in life they were neutered.
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      11-28-2012 02:05 PM #22
      Quote Originally Posted by CO Boy View Post
      Neutering and behavior are not tied together. It's an old wives tale that a neutered dog will be better behaved. All I've seen is less marking, depending on when in life they were neutered.
      You do realize that marking is a behavior? So you just proved yourself wrong.
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