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    Thread: Anyone buy a dog out of state?

    1. 09-27-2012 09:39 PM #1
      So the wife and I are pretty dead set on a Belgian Sheppard but might have to go out of state to get one. Wondering if any of you have done this, and how it went? The one thing that has me thinking is getting the dog home, we could drive there (Colorado to California) but the breeder also offers to ship the dog (Delta Pet Airlines) but I'm nervous over the idea of a puppy being flown to me. Thoughts? Picture is of a different litter


    2. 09-28-2012 10:08 AM #2
      I just completed this task a few weeks ago. My fiancée and I decided to go with a breeder in Virginia and we live in North Carolina (Our distance wasn't as great as yours, it was roughly 300 miles). After you have a contract with the breeder, try to visit them, unless they are highly regarded in the Belgian Shepherd community. There are breeders out there that don't really care how the puppies are treated, they just pump them out.

      A few days before you pick up your puppy, send a blanket (We just had a baby/swaddling blanket sent from Amazon to the breeder) to get the scent of the mother and litter mates. Once the pup goes into its crate, it will be very comfortable if the scented blanket is in there(Ours at eight weeks literally whined for 20 seconds, then was an angel the rest of the drive). We stopped every 1.5-2 hours to let her out of the crate, go potty, and have a few treats. The blanket continued its magic once we got home, she didn't complain at all when it was time to go to bed or spend a few hours in her crate.

      We have a smaller travel crate that will last a few more weeks (She just turned 10 weeks) and a larger crate to compensate her at full growth, which has a divider to use accordingly.

      A few other tips:

      -Ask your breeder to start crating the puppy the last week at night.
      -Ask your breeder what puppy food the puppies are eating, so you can pick up a bag to help transition to the food of your choice.
      -Have a SMALL collar and a LIGHT WEIGHT leash for the puppy.
      -Kong toys are great to put treats/kibble in to keep the pup busy in the crate.
      -Read a good book on training puppies (We read Perfect Puppy in 7 Days by Dr. Sophia Yin)
      -If you like sleeping in late, get that out of your system now.

      Good luck with your journey, it's a fun one!

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      09-28-2012 12:12 PM #3
      As an animal cruelty investigator, I don't know how many complaints I've had to investigate with people ordering dogs from out of state by mail order, just to get them sick, inured, etc. Obviously not everyone is going to have that experience, so don't get me wrong. I've also visited hundreds of breeders and most of them usually have less than ideal facilities for what they do - they're legal under the law, but I think most people probably would NOT buy from them if they could actually see where they are coming from. I've also been to some breeders that had nice facilities, but they are the exception and not the rule. Most breeders who have a lot of dogs house them outdoors on dirt or on concrete slabs, so the dogs ultimately end up being in their own urine and feces most of the time. They go out and clean (well, some of them do anyway), but it's not too often. Of course nobody sees this and when they get their dog, it smells like flowers and is spotless because they've cleaned them up. Don't get sucked in by AKC registered and all of that stuff, it's just paperwork that they file and it's meaningless. I've also done investigations on "USDA inspected/licensed facilities" where we ended up seizing the animals with local authorities because of deplorable conditions. USDA inspected/license is also meaningless.

      So with all of that said, here is my advice and you can take it or leave it. Find a Belgian Shephard rescue group and get your dog from there. There may not be one in your state or close to you, but if you are comfortable with going out of state, it shouldn't make any difference. If your still dead set on using a breeder, do what was suggested above and go visit the breeder. If they won't let you come to their house or facility, that's what we call a clue. Most of them won't allow people to come to their house (not all, but I would say most) because they don't want people seeing the conditions the dogs are housed in. Of course some just don't want strangers coming to their houses either, but the handful of really good breeders that I've dealt with have no problems allowing people to come by. When you go, pay attention to sounds and most importantly the smell. If you get out of your car and the house or property smells like a sewer, that's a clue.

      Again, this isn't to imply that all breeders are necessarily bad. But the vast majority that I have dealt with do the bare minimum required to be compliant under various state laws, especially if they are someone that has numerous animals on their property. The average breeder that I visit usually has anywhere from 40 - 300 dogs on their property and they are usually caring for them all by themselves and that's why they are usually pretty nasty. Unless you are out there full time caring for that many animals, it's going to get bad and most of them can't do it full time. The people that just have one or two breeding pairs and keep them in the house, that's another story. Just try to know who you are dealing with

    4. Member Rockerchick's Avatar
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      09-28-2012 02:34 PM #4
      Quote Originally Posted by MeineFolks'wagen View Post
      As an animal cruelty investigator, I don't know how many complaints I've had to investigate with people ordering dogs from out of state by mail order, just to get them sick, inured, etc. Obviously not everyone is going to have that experience, so don't get me wrong. I've also visited hundreds of breeders and most of them usually have less than ideal facilities for what they do - they're legal under the law, but I think most people probably would NOT buy from them if they could actually see where they are coming from. I've also been to some breeders that had nice facilities, but they are the exception and not the rule. Most breeders who have a lot of dogs house them outdoors on dirt or on concrete slabs, so the dogs ultimately end up being in their own urine and feces most of the time. They go out and clean (well, some of them do anyway), but it's not too often. Of course nobody sees this and when they get their dog, it smells like flowers and is spotless because they've cleaned them up. Don't get sucked in by AKC registered and all of that stuff, it's just paperwork that they file and it's meaningless. I've also done investigations on "USDA inspected/licensed facilities" where we ended up seizing the animals with local authorities because of deplorable conditions. USDA inspected/license is also meaningless.

      So with all of that said, here is my advice and you can take it or leave it. Find a Belgian Shephard rescue group and get your dog from there. There may not be one in your state or close to you, but if you are comfortable with going out of state, it shouldn't make any difference. If your still dead set on using a breeder, do what was suggested above and go visit the breeder. If they won't let you come to their house or facility, that's what we call a clue. Most of them won't allow people to come to their house (not all, but I would say most) because they don't want people seeing the conditions the dogs are housed in. Of course some just don't want strangers coming to their houses either, but the handful of really good breeders that I've dealt with have no problems allowing people to come by. When you go, pay attention to sounds and most importantly the smell. If you get out of your car and the house or property smells like a sewer, that's a clue.

      Again, this isn't to imply that all breeders are necessarily bad. But the vast majority that I have dealt with do the bare minimum required to be compliant under various state laws, especially if they are someone that has numerous animals on their property. The average breeder that I visit usually has anywhere from 40 - 300 dogs on their property and they are usually caring for them all by themselves and that's why they are usually pretty nasty. Unless you are out there full time caring for that many animals, it's going to get bad and most of them can't do it full time. The people that just have one or two breeding pairs and keep them in the house, that's another story. Just try to know who you are dealing with
      Off topic, but I just have to say thank you for your work! Not enough being done for animal cruelty cases in my state unfortunately
      Quote Originally Posted by TM87 View Post
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    5. 09-28-2012 02:48 PM #5
      Quote Originally Posted by Rockerchick View Post
      Off topic, but I just have to say thank you for your work! Not enough being done for animal cruelty cases in my state unfortunately
      I was actually pretty happy with my interaction with Animal Control last week. There is a pit-mix puppy (Probably 12-14 weeks old) in our neighborhood that stays out on the back deck all day/night, all the time. The family blocked off the deck stairs with lawn chairs... After the puppy escaped a few times, they "upgraded" to blocking it with the grill. It just relieves itself on the deck when it has to go. After we had some unusually warm, then wet days, I got fed up and called. The officer came out and talked to them (Within about an hour), the family had to come up with proper shelter for the dog or surrender it. Sadly, the dog will live on the back deck with no attention or proper training, but at the end of the day, it's still be treated better than a lot of animals out there. It's just heart breaking when we go out with our puppy and see the pit-mix stick its head through the railing to see what it's missing.

    6. 09-28-2012 07:28 PM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by MeineFolks'wagen View Post
      As an animal cruelty investigator, I don't know how many complaints I've had to investigate with people ordering dogs from out of state by mail order, just to get them sick, inured, etc. Obviously not everyone is going to have that experience, so don't get me wrong. I've also visited hundreds of breeders and most of them usually have less than ideal facilities for what they do - they're legal under the law, but I think most people probably would NOT buy from them if they could actually see where they are coming from. I've also been to some breeders that had nice facilities, but they are the exception and not the rule. Most breeders who have a lot of dogs house them outdoors on dirt or on concrete slabs, so the dogs ultimately end up being in their own urine and feces most of the time. They go out and clean (well, some of them do anyway), but it's not too often. Of course nobody sees this and when they get their dog, it smells like flowers and is spotless because they've cleaned them up. Don't get sucked in by AKC registered and all of that stuff, it's just paperwork that they file and it's meaningless. I've also done investigations on "USDA inspected/licensed facilities" where we ended up seizing the animals with local authorities because of deplorable conditions. USDA inspected/license is also meaningless.

      So with all of that said, here is my advice and you can take it or leave it. Find a Belgian Shephard rescue group and get your dog from there. There may not be one in your state or close to you, but if you are comfortable with going out of state, it shouldn't make any difference. If your still dead set on using a breeder, do what was suggested above and go visit the breeder. If they won't let you come to their house or facility, that's what we call a clue. Most of them won't allow people to come to their house (not all, but I would say most) because they don't want people seeing the conditions the dogs are housed in. Of course some just don't want strangers coming to their houses either, but the handful of really good breeders that I've dealt with have no problems allowing people to come by. When you go, pay attention to sounds and most importantly the smell. If you get out of your car and the house or property smells like a sewer, that's a clue.

      Again, this isn't to imply that all breeders are necessarily bad. But the vast majority that I have dealt with do the bare minimum required to be compliant under various state laws, especially if they are someone that has numerous animals on their property. The average breeder that I visit usually has anywhere from 40 - 300 dogs on their property and they are usually caring for them all by themselves and that's why they are usually pretty nasty. Unless you are out there full time caring for that many animals, it's going to get bad and most of them can't do it full time. The people that just have one or two breeding pairs and keep them in the house, that's another story. Just try to know who you are dealing with
      Lots of good info here, thanks. The Belgian shephard community, The Terv in particular is rather small in the US so I am not too worried about finding a good breeder but more so the process of getting the dog as we will likely be going out of state to do so.

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      09-29-2012 12:42 PM #7
      After we lost my wife's mixed breed to Lymes disease I thought it would be cute to get another dog that was born on the same day we have to have Tatiana put to sleep. She decided she wanted a chihuahua since she had wanted one for a long time. After searching around the internet for a couple weeks we actually found a breeder/show dog handler in North Carolina who had just had a litter on that same day we were trying to get. We contacted her via email, talked on a phone a couple times and then decided to pull the trigger. After a couple months we got the call that she was ready to come home to us. Instead of risking shipping a tiny puppy in the luggage hold of a plane my wife decided she was going to fly down to pick her up personally. The breeder loved this idea. She actually picked her up from the airport, they went to dinner, then back to her house to meet all the dogs.

      A couple hours later she was back on a plane heading home with a tiny puppy in her carry on. Wouldn't you know Leela has the EXACT same temperament, behaviors, and attitude as Tatiana. It's creepy at times how much they're alike. So, that was our success story but as other have said, it's all about a case by case scenario.

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      09-30-2012 09:02 PM #8
      Quote Originally Posted by tq05 View Post
      So the wife and I are pretty dead set on a Belgian Sheppard but might have to go out of state to get one. Wondering if any of you have done this, and how it went? The one thing that has me thinking is getting the dog home, we could drive there (Colorado to California) but the breeder also offers to ship the dog (Delta Pet Airlines) but I'm nervous over the idea of a puppy being flown to me. Thoughts? Picture is of a different litter

      Supposedly, Delta leads the airline industry in pet deaths. Do some your own research and come to your own conclusion.

      Personally, I rather spend the time to drive out (mine was an 8-hour drive each way)...to see the breeder.
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    9. Senior Member NoDubJustYet's Avatar
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      10-01-2012 10:32 AM #9
      We drove six hours each way to get our Ridgeback... Being able to actually visit the breeder was helpful, especially to get a feel for what the parents were like.

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