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    Thread: Upshifting with Manual Transmission: Which theory is correct?

    1. Member admiralbabar's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 02:56 PM #26
      ^^^ The .gif really seals the deal on that one

      2nd option has never given me any trouble and I've always gotten loooooong life out of my clutches. Some people are better than others at it, mostly.
      Last edited by admiralbabar; 10-07-2012 at 03:00 PM.
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    2. Member yurikaze's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 03:03 PM #27
      This sounds like the ministry of silly shifting.

    3. Member MangoBurnout's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 03:06 PM #28
      those 2 are the exact same thing. one is faster.
      option #3. get an auto.

    4. Member Activ8's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 03:17 PM #29
      Quote Originally Posted by USMC_Artmayer View Post
      1. gas to floor
      2. without lifting right foot stomp clutch
      3. bang gear
      4. release clutch
      power shift it son
      Impossible on a Carrera GT .... it's a bit counter-intuitive, but you've got to slam the clutch and lift off as fast as possible instead of slowly and no gas until full engagement felt, then slam the power pedal to the floor .....

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      10-07-2012 03:23 PM #30
      Quote Originally Posted by WhitePoloCT View Post
      You are over-thinking this. You should do whatever is smoothest. For me, it's closest to #2.
      Quote Originally Posted by 03GTI4Me View Post
      It would seem to me that beginners start out on the 1st option with the goal of becoming more experienced and getting to the second option.
      Both of the above.
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    6. Member dopaz's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 04:24 PM #31
      Quote Originally Posted by USMC_Artmayer View Post
      1. gas to floor
      2. without lifting right foot stomp clutch
      3. bang gear
      4. release clutch
      power shift it son
      So much fun! I wonder what my second gear synchro looks like though...

    7. Member Live-Wire's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 05:13 PM #32
      Whatever is the smoothest and causes least amount of slip on the clutch (comes hand in hand with smoothness... so it's a win win) is the best. Ideally you need to use the throttle to match engine rpm with new road speed. Using a bit of throttle is not going to burn up the clutch - but having a massive difference in engine to road speed will (in either direction... over revving, or under revving).

      It's best when the shifts are almost imperceptible, and the rpm looks correct; it should fall towards where it needs to be in the next gear, then you will 'catch' it by applying just enough throttle to prevent it dropping furthur. Of course you can only apply sufficient throttle to really accelerate the car when the clutch pedal has been released.

      Operating any machinery the key to longevity is smoothness, smoothness, smoothness.

    8. Member B3sat16v's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 05:21 PM #33
      It is situational dependent.

      Sometimes I do not use the clutch other than first gear.
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    9. Member compy222's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 05:22 PM #34
      1 if the box is cold. 2 normally or driving hard.
      Quote Originally Posted by capsaicin View Post
      AP1 S2000? I can not in good conscience talk you out of that. May your slip angle be great and your bed not be the couch!

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      10-07-2012 05:30 PM #35
      let off gas.
      load is taken off gears
      slips easily out of gear and while in between gears
      push in clutch
      select next gear
      let out clutch
      hit gas.

      i find myself doing this fairly often even though im sure its not very good for syncros.

      but it seems like i have very little to no shift shock at all doing this.

      anyone know if this method is bad for the gearbox or not??

      ps.
      i do this only while driving normally with low2500-3000rpm shifts.
      Last edited by WeeTallDidTiming; 10-07-2012 at 05:36 PM.

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      10-07-2012 05:37 PM #36
      In the Rabbit (rev hang, terribly spongey mounts) option 1 is the smoothest.
      In the CRX option 2 is the smoothest.

    12. Member CostcoPizza's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 05:43 PM #37
      Assuming you're upshift rev-matching, I don't get why people think option 2 would be less wear on the clutch.

      With 2 you're slipping the clutch with each upshift, which does it make it smoother (less shock from just releasing the clutch), but means more wear, no?
      Last edited by CostcoPizza; 10-07-2012 at 05:58 PM.
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      10-07-2012 05:51 PM #38
      I go with number 2 in the b6 a4. Also is resting your hand on the shifter bad for the synchros? I read somewhere that it is bad.

    14. Geriatric Member Aonarch's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 05:53 PM #39
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      10-07-2012 05:53 PM #40
      Quote Originally Posted by CAH8 View Post
      I go with number 2 in the b6 a4. Also is resting your hand on the shifter bad for the synchros? I read somewhere that it is bad.
      Bad for the TOB.
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    16. Member joedubs's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 06:05 PM #41
      Leaving your hand on the shifter has absolutely nothing to do with the throw out bearing (if that's what you meant by TOB)...
      If you do method 1 too slow (which I can only imagine you would be, if you're actually thinking about it) chances are the rpms drop way too much between shifts. When you let the clutch back out it'll slip all the way back to where they should be. Furthermore as someone else said, the engine braking will lead to a pretty sloppy shift.
      In normal driving I only use the clutch when re-engaging the gear. If you dont load up the trans too much (no acceleration or deceleration) it pulls right out of gear without clutching in.

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      10-07-2012 06:41 PM #42
      Quote Originally Posted by CAH8 View Post
      I go with number 2 in the b6 a4. Also is resting your hand on the shifter bad for the synchros? I read somewhere that it is bad.
      I have heard this before as well, i think it depends on what you call resting, if your elbow is on the center arm rest i think its ok, if the weight of your entire arm, then no

    18. Member delrio's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 07:16 PM #43
      Quote Originally Posted by dopaz View Post
      So much fun! I wonder what my second gear synchro looks like though...
      Broke mine a long time ago
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      10-07-2012 08:02 PM #44
      Quote Originally Posted by delrio View Post
      Broke mine a long time ago
      On your ti?

      I think my 318ti's 2nd gear synchro is going out. Sometimes when I shift to 2nd and it feels like it engaged, but its actually not. Then, when I try to push the gear into 2nd completely, it grinds.
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    20. Member delrio's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 08:07 PM #45
      Quote Originally Posted by mac dre View Post
      On your ti?

      I think my 318ti's 2nd gear synchro is going out. Sometimes when I shift to 2nd and it feels like it engaged, but its actually not. Then, when I try to push the gear into 2nd completely, it grinds.
      Actually on my jetta

      ti trans can take a beating for the most part and not run into problems at least from my experience and what I read about others.
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    21. Member ThreadBomber's Avatar
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      10-08-2012 12:42 AM #46
      2

      1 just seems wrong
      Teefy Buna

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    22. Member genjy's Avatar
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      10-08-2012 12:58 AM #47
      I think mine is closest to #2.

      #1 seems really clunky and it's just not really how it's supposed to be done.

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      10-08-2012 01:10 AM #48
      #1 in my Subaru and #2 in the bimmer. It also depends on rpm. Higher rpm shifts tend to feel like #2.

    24. Member TetsuoShima's Avatar
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      10-08-2012 01:29 AM #49
      Quote Originally Posted by Mr Miyagi View Post
      Just put it in drive.
      Just put it in H

    25. 10-08-2012 09:57 AM #50
      Quote Originally Posted by mac dre View Post
      Assuming you're upshift rev-matching, I don't get why people think option 2 would be less wear on the clutch.

      With 2 you're slipping the clutch with each upshift, which does it make it smoother (less shock from just releasing the clutch), but means more wear, no?
      Not so, if you get the timing correct. Simultaneously disconnecting the clutch as you are taking load off the engine (releasing accelerator pedal) means it's not slipping on the first step. Re-engaging the clutch after the engine has come down in revs during the shift to roughly the same speed, so that there is not a major step in engine speed that the clutch has to take up, means there's absolute minimum slippage on re-engagement. Done correctly, the gear change is very smooth with next to no slippage.

      I've put 400,000 km on two different manual transmission cars and never had to change a clutch. The Jetta is going to need a clutch soon, but only because of the crappy DMF mechanism (which wears itself out regardless of what the driver does).

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