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    Thread: Competing company reached out to me

    1. Member lightbulb8817's Avatar
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      10-07-2012 11:27 PM #1
      I'm not sure how to handle this situation. I like my current job and I've been here for 1.5 years. I think my salary is fair, but it could be higher. My coworkers are awesome. I work my butt off and my work knows it. It can be stressful sometimes but I think this goes for all jobs.

      The other day, a recruiter called me about a competing company that is really interested in me. I returned the call and had a phone interview with that company. At the end of my phone interview, I made it clear to them that I'm not out shopping for jobs. I told them that I really like my current job and it would have to be an awesome opportunity for me to switch. They said they understand and think they can make that happen. We are scheduled to do a lunch interview.

      Ideally, I would like to stay at my current company and get them to match the offer of the competitor. I know that my work HATES the other company. I don't want there to be any resentment.

      Any advice on how I should handle this situation?

    2. Member SpookyReverb's Avatar
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      10-08-2012 01:33 AM #2
      Every place is different, but my father in law had the same thing happen, told his current company what was happening, and the current company bumped his salary up significantly.
      - Austin

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      10-08-2012 09:43 AM #3
      You are in a good position. I would have the lunch and see where it goes and how comfortable you feel on what they have to say. I would then let my manager know that you have been made aware of the competing company wanting to recruit you. Don't go into details about a lunch and all that, just general knowledge that makes them aware. Then be prepared to discuss how you'd like to proceed.

      This has happened to me several times in my career and I've leveraged each opportunity to my benefit. Most recently, one of our largest competitors contacted me and I made my manager aware. They flat out asked what it would take to make me not think about moving.

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      10-08-2012 12:30 PM #4
      As someone who recruits 'passive candidates'--aka, people just like you--all the time, let me share a couple of things with you:

      -You should always have the conversation. And you have, which is smart.
      -If you continue the process, you should really decide whether their opportunity is compelling enough to make you want to leave your current company/position. And by that, I don't just mean what you are doing now--but what you could be doing in the future.
      -If the answer is no, the best thing to do is politely decline the opportunity to move forward. Why?
      -Going to your current employer with a competing offer in hand is a big gamble, and often doesn't work in the long term. It forces your current employer to make a decision quickly about your value, which can result in a short-term win for you. But it also introduces doubt about your longer-term stickiness; I've seen it time and time again where a company rushes to try and retain an employee they think is mission-critical, only to have that employee leave within a year. Part of the time it's because their manager no longer believes that the employee is engaged--if you try to leave once, who is to say that you're not still looking? So I would use that tactic only if you're really willing to make the jump to the other company.

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      10-08-2012 04:14 PM #5
      Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb8817 View Post
      Ideally, I would like to stay at my current company and get them to match the offer of the competitor. I know that my work HATES the other company. I don't want there to be any resentment.
      Before you ask, I'll help you out. Yes, you signed a non-compete agreement and yes, it's going to get ugly when you accept this position. While I wouldn't use this alone as a reason to avoid the situation, it's worth being prepared for on the front end.

      Here you go:
      Schedule a time on your boss' calendar (for the last part of the day) to meet.
      "Hey boss, I've had several recruiters contact me in recent weeks about job opportunities. I'm not sure how they're finding me because I'm not applying anywhere. I really like working here and I'd like to talk about the future. I've got goals for where I want to be in several years, but I'm curious to know how I fit in to your long term plan..."

      Just stage this as a type of futurecasting discussion where you're laying your cards on the table to see what your employer thinks of you. HOPEFULLY your boss will talk about career advancement and options to grow your skill and value to the company. Ideally, you'd want to have another meeting coming up where the two of you can plot a course for this advancement. Red flags would be if your boss is merely agitated that other companies have been contacting you.

    6. Member lightbulb8817's Avatar
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      10-08-2012 09:58 PM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by Numbersix View Post
      ...
      -Going to your current employer with a competing offer in hand is a big gamble, and often doesn't work in the long term. It forces your current employer to make a decision quickly about your value, which can result in a short-term win for you. But it also introduces doubt about your longer-term stickiness; I've seen it time and time again where a company rushes to try and retain an employee they think is mission-critical, only to have that employee leave within a year. Part of the time it's because their manager no longer believes that the employee is engaged--if you try to leave once, who is to say that you're not still looking? So I would use that tactic only if you're really willing to make the jump to the other company.
      This is what I'm afraid of.

      At my current job, I train new hires who have much more experience than I do. I know that they wouldn't want to let me go easy.

      The same thing happened a few months ago. That competing company offered a positioned to one of our engineers. My company offered him a company car to try to get him to stay but he still left because the offer was so good.

      I'm still on the fence.

    7. Member lightbulb8817's Avatar
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      10-08-2012 10:03 PM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by Diamond Dave View Post
      ...
      Here you go:
      Schedule a time on your boss' calendar (for the last part of the day) to meet.
      "Hey boss, I've had several recruiters contact me in recent weeks about job opportunities. I'm not sure how they're finding me because I'm not applying anywhere. I really like working here and I'd like to talk about the future. I've got goals for where I want to be in several years, but I'm curious to know how I fit in to your long term plan..."

      Just stage this as a type of futurecasting discussion where you're laying your cards on the table to see what your employer thinks of you. HOPEFULLY your boss will talk about career advancement and options to grow your skill and value to the company. Ideally, you'd want to have another meeting coming up where the two of you can plot a course for this advancement. Red flags would be if your boss is merely agitated that other companies have been contacting you.
      I'm on the fast track at my company. They started a career advancement program for accelerated employees recently and they chose to try it on me first.

      I would like to stay at my current company. A recent higher that came from another competing company told me the way to get ahead in this industry is to move laterally. They aren't going to promote you and give you an raise much higher that 3-5% unless they have good reason to.

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      10-09-2012 10:36 AM #8
      Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb8817 View Post
      I would like to stay at my current company. A recent higher that came from another competing company told me the way to get ahead in this industry is to move laterally. They aren't going to promote you and give you an raise much higher that 3-5% unless they have good reason to.
      I'd say that's pretty true. The first job I worked when I graduated from college (engineering) was in the aerospace industry, and its the same way. 1-3% raises are about all you're going to get. My job was pretty interesting, but I could see myself at 55 making just a hair over what I had when I graduated from college. I didn't want that, so I got a new job, with a management position for a 15% pay raise. I essentially fast-tracked myself by moving jobs.

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      10-09-2012 10:55 PM #9
      Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb8817 View Post
      I'm on the fast track at my company. They started a career advancement program for accelerated employees recently and they chose to try it on me first.

      I would like to stay at my current company. A recent higher that came from another competing company told me the way to get ahead in this industry is to move laterally. They aren't going to promote you and give you an raise much higher that 3-5% unless they have good reason to.
      Your biggest raises will come from changing jobs, you can otherwise anticipate a 3% raise year after year... some people don't even get that. Sounds like you enjoy your current company... If you are seriously entertaining the offer make sure it's a permanent position and not just some recruiter trying to fill a 6 month contract. In my experience there are a lot of shady recruiters out there so try to get everything in writing if you are going forward with the move.

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      10-14-2012 07:00 AM #10
      What is going to make you happier? More money or that warm and fuzzy feeling you get from working at a job you like? Money.

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      10-14-2012 09:53 AM #11
      Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb8817 View Post
      I'm on the fast track at my company. They started a career advancement program for accelerated employees recently and they chose to try it on me first.

      I would like to stay at my current company. A recent higher that came from another competing company told me the way to get ahead in this industry is to move laterally. They aren't going to promote you and give you an raise much higher that 3-5% unless they have good reason to.
      So you need to weigh your options and decide what matters to you. Sounds like your company has sights on you as a star and you likely don't fall into the normal process that most others do. Yes, it is very true that the majority of the time, people fall into the 2-5% increase each year based on performance and company expectations- but that isn't always the case. Companies often have their eyes on special people and they will get treated in such a manner.

      Personally, if you are happy and on track for better things, I would stay. Unless this is some once in a lifetime opportunity to weigh, another one will come along. If your company wasn't doing anything for you and the outlook was grim, then the option would be more enticing.

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      10-14-2012 11:51 AM #12
      Or they're jerkin his **** and stringing him along only to hear "upper management decided that blah blah blah." Again, when you're not making as much as you would be if you left, how far does that felling of "Oh, but I love where I work." go? The warm and fuzzy is horse sh1t. Don't praise me, pays me. If they knew how awesome you are, instead of sucking your ****, they'd give you more.

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      10-14-2012 12:23 PM #13
      Quote Originally Posted by Quattro Krant View Post
      Or they're jerkin his **** and stringing him along only to hear "upper management decided that blah blah blah." Again, when you're not making as much as you would be if you left, how far does that felling of "Oh, but I love where I work." go? The warm and fuzzy is horse sh1t. Don't praise me, pays me. If they knew how awesome you are, instead of sucking your ****, they'd give you more.
      It must be awful to go through life so miserable as you. Here's a hug for you
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      10-14-2012 02:02 PM #14
      Quote Originally Posted by Quattro Krant View Post
      Or they're jerkin his **** and stringing him along only to hear "upper management decided that blah blah blah." Again, when you're not making as much as you would be if you left, how far does that felling of "Oh, but I love where I work." go? The warm and fuzzy is horse sh1t. Don't praise me, pays me. If they knew how awesome you are, instead of sucking your ****, they'd give you more.
      Wow. Who peed in your Wheaties?

      You've clearly been burned at some point--bummer dude. But there's nothing wrong with someone being strategic about managing their career. Because--let me be clear about this--nobody else will ever do it for you.

      He's best off listening to what Dave suggested, and heeding my caution. We do this for a living.

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      10-14-2012 04:53 PM #15
      I agree with Quattro. It is especially interesting how all of a sudden they "realize" the value of an employee when he or she bring two week notice because other company is willing to pay more, sometimes a lot more. Budget become flexible and "upper management" have no issues to match the offer, including vacation, stock options...

      If someone mentions to you at the time of employment "warm, family atmosphere", it should be red flag. It is nice to have "warm, family atmosphere", but it should be bonus, not the real reason, unless you are girl right after school.
      I am looking for a job in Transportation, Logistics, Distribution or International Trade. Analysis, Planning, Operations.

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      10-15-2012 09:17 AM #16
      Quote Originally Posted by Quattro Krant View Post
      What is going to make you happier? More money or that warm and fuzzy feeling you get from working at a job you like? Money.
      I wholeheartedly disagree. Working at a terrible place is usually never worth the money, unless its the kind of money that allows you to retire in a year or two. Maybe that's why you're so bitter?

      OP, I suppose I was a tad misleading with my post. You WILL make more by moving around, but its up to you whether they money is going to make you happier. If you really love your job now, I'd stay.

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      10-15-2012 10:39 AM #17
      Quote Originally Posted by msrothwell View Post
      I wholeheartedly disagree. Working at a terrible place is usually never worth the money, unless its the kind of money that allows you to retire in a year or two. Maybe that's why you're so bitter?
      Nope. I work for myself so all this "Oh, it's a great place to work but I make $35K a year" is absolute comedy to me. I'm just bitter as I am balls deep in the stupidity of man on a daily basis.

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