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    Thread: DIY Auto to Manual transmission conversion + 5th gear set swap

    1. Member
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      06-05-2013 04:38 PM #1
      I'm one driveshaft and a starter away from having everything I need to do the swap. I'm planning on writing up the whole process here with photos etc. If there is anything anyone would like me to focus on or ensure to capture in the photos, now is the time to ask!

      I should be doing the 5th gear set swap in the next couple of weeks, and then the transmission swap in July. I'm going wiht a .658 5th gear set which should have me around 2750 RPMs @ 70mph on the highway. Should quiet things down a lot, reduce engine noise, and increase fuel economy.

    2. 06-05-2013 05:09 PM #2
      Two things I'd like to know about...

      1. Spring washer and fitment, see http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/archive/i...p/t-89683.html

      The low .65 and .622 gears often need a modification to the spring washer to make them fit. Or you can get the washer from vw.
      The gears should fit fine, just the washer is sometimes bigger than the smaller gear therefor needs either modifying or a smaller one buying.
      stuck the washer from the small gear on the lathe took about 4mm from the out side ,so it would not hit the teeth form the other gear
      2. How easy do things come apart and go back on? One thread somewhere said to heat the gears with a torch or something to get them to go on/off easier. Ugh, really?

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      06-05-2013 05:27 PM #3
      I believe the spring washer difference is that it is simply a smaller outer diameter. The gearset I bought from boraparts.com actually came with a new properly sized spring washer so that'll be a non issue.

      I'll definitely add notes about how easy or hard the gears are to get off. I am guessing a torch will be required from everything I've read. I have one so that's covered, but finding the right size puller and grinding it down so it fits onto the gear properly may be the more challenging part. I'll make sure to detail that.

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      06-10-2013 08:21 PM #4
      Here is a pic of the 5th gear set with the smaller washer:


      Did some cleanup on the transmission today to prepare for the 5th gear swap. The donor van came from North Carolina and the outside of the tranny was covered in a paste of grease and sand.

      Before:


      After:



      This is how I got the parts off the van:


      When I was under it, I noticed the left side of the van wasn't resting on the "rack" so I looked around to see what was supporting it and found it to be this:



    5. Member
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      06-11-2013 09:23 PM #5
      Did most of the shifter bushings tonight. I'm replacing every bushing possible.

      If you don't have a hydraulic press, you can use a bench vice and some sockets to press old bushings out and new ones in like this:


      Here are all the components taken apart and (somewhat) cleaned up. Most of the new bushings are in place:



      Two of the pieces I bought didn't work: The small ball at the transmission end which was my fault, wrong part number, so I need to get the right one. Also, the square plastic guide at the bottom of the shift rod was superseded to a part that doesn't look like it will work very well so I may leave the old one in place.

      [Update 7/10/2013] The small ball-bushing on the shift arm (the one with the spring pin that goes through it) that VW sells WILL NOT fit. The hole diameter is way too small to fit on the rod. You'd have to drill it out and drilling a globe-shaped nylon bushing is nearly impossible without equipment that I don't have.

      After I get the last couple pieces I need for the linkage, the next step will be to swap the 5th gear set out.
      Last edited by djnibler; 07-10-2013 at 04:18 PM.

    6. Member The Producer's Avatar
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      06-14-2013 01:59 PM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by djnibler View Post
      When I was under it, I noticed the left side of the van wasn't resting on the "rack" so I looked around to see what was supporting it and found it to be this:


      You went under that voluntarily? 9 beers for each of your nine lives sir.

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      06-14-2013 02:13 PM #7
      I drove seven hours to get this stuff.... I was past the point of no return!!!

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      06-15-2013 05:56 PM #8
      A very frustrating day for me.

      I removed the end cover from the transmission and one of the bolts snapped off so it is stuck inside the transmission. I tried an easy-out and the easy out snapped off in the hole I drilled into the bolt



      Complete bummer now because those easy outs are chrome vanadium steel. I'm now trying to drill out the easy-out and the nice bits I have aren't even scratching it. Unless anyone else has any good advice, I'm going to see if I can't find a very tiny grinding bit for my dremel. But at this point, I think I'm going to have to try to drill out the hole to the diameter of the bolt and run a tap through it as opposed to trying to back out the broken bolt. What a pain in the.....

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      06-17-2013 08:57 AM #9
      The broken bolt saga continues. Took it to my brother in-law's house. He welded a nut to the face of the broken bolt. After it cooled we tried to wrench it off with the nut. No dice. Oh well. Ordered a nice set of cobalt tipped drill bits. Will try to drill it out. Hopefully the cobalt tipped bits will cut through the broken easy-out.


    10. 06-21-2013 01:58 PM #10
      Quote Originally Posted by gti_matt View Post
      Two things I'd like to know about...

      1. Spring washer and fitment, see http://www.vwt4forum.co.uk/archive/i...p/t-89683.html
      Quote Originally Posted by djnibler View Post
      I believe the spring washer difference is that it is simply a smaller outer diameter.
      Yep, just smaller or else it would be big enough to interfere with the teeth.


      Quote Originally Posted by gti_matt
      2. How easy do things come apart and go back on? One thread somewhere said to heat the gears with a torch or something to get them to go on/off easier. Ugh, really?
      I've seen both extremes, where they just slide off, and where you have to heat it up and still use a puller. You def need to invest some money or get a hold of the proper puller or else you run a very high risk of damaging the gears. There is VERY little room under the gears.

      Since these gears are the very same (style) ones as found in your 02A you can also refer to this
      http://www.myturbodiesel.com/1000q/m...ar-swap-VW.htm

    11. 06-21-2013 02:00 PM #11
      Quote Originally Posted by djnibler View Post
      The broken bolt saga continues. Took it to my brother in-law's house. He welded a nut to the face of the broken bolt. After it cooled we tried to wrench it off with the nut. No dice. Oh well. Ordered a nice set of cobalt tipped drill bits. Will try to drill it out. Hopefully the cobalt tipped bits will cut through the broken easy-out.

      If you have access to a "real" machine shop they might be able to drill it out so precisely that the remaining parts of the bolt just peels out, while not touching the threads at all. Not really that easy to do with "home shop" equipment though!

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      06-22-2013 12:35 AM #12
      My neighbour bought an outboard motor over to me after he broke off a couple of studs, from memory 6mm. I filed the end flat & clamped the crankcase onto the table of my drill press that has a compound table. Starting with a centre drill & if possible a good eye it's possible to drill with a tapping size drill or slightly smaller & remove the core of the stud. With care the remainder of the thread is removed with a tap.
      I haven't ever had much success with an easy out on a small stud, the easy out tends to spread the remaining stud making it even tighter.
      I know it's too late now but in future before applying too much force when undoing, try some heat on the head & instead of just turning anticlockwise try turning in both directions carefully to break the hold.
      I would have tried the welding of a nut first instead of the easy out. Hope this is of some help.

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      06-22-2013 09:50 AM #13
      If I could not get this into a mill, line it up and cut it out with a carbide end mill, I would go to McMastercarr.com and order up 2 or 3 Extra-Long Double Cut Carbide Burs w/ 1/8" Shank Diameter and 1/8" Head Diameter, PN 4313A33, load 'em into my Dremel tool and play dentist for a while. With luck I could pick out the remaining male thread crests from the female roots and be good to go. Otherwise, after getting the bolt out I’d buy a Helicoil kit for it and make it stronger than new.
      IVAN
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      06-22-2013 05:56 PM #14
      Thanks guys for the input.

      Dan, what you suggested is exactly what I've done and am doing: I got a carbide bit for the dremel and went in there and cleaned out as much as I could. Had to drill a slightly off center hole first so I could get the dremel bit in there and work it up toward the broken easy-out. This worked, though the hole is a little mangled now.

      Next I'm going to fill it with JB weld and after it cures, will use a drill press to drill out an oversized hole for the M6x1.0 helicoil. 95% of the JB weld should come out when I drill.... its mainly there to fill in the offset hole I drilled and to help keep the drill bit centered when I put it on the drill press.

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      06-22-2013 09:31 PM #15
      I decided to stop doing battle with the broken bolt today and pulled the gears off.

      Autozone has a free tool loaner program and they stock a gear puller that works PERFECTLY for the large gear. I used that puller, and heated the gear up with a torch and it came off nicely. Couple of things to note: The gear itself rides on a bearing so it will come right off. Part of the synchro hub, however, is a press-on fit so it is this, and not the gear, that you have to get off. The hub has notches around it and three of them fit this puller perfectly. Back the big bolt out 5-10mm, then put the puller on, heat the synchro with a torch and tighten the puller with your hands. The torch was key. I heated it up a bit, tightened the puller by hand as much as I could and it wouldn't move. So I heated it up even more and it began coming off as I tightened the puller. Note the puller doesn't have a bolt to turn... you have to use your hands.



      Here is a pic of the tool name (OEM 27107 Posi lock 3 jaw 2 ton puller):



      After getting the synchro off, the big gear just slides right off since it is on a bearing.

      The smaller gear needs to be pulled off. The puller I used on the big gear didn't fit so I used this one I had in my toolbox:



      The smaller gear came off really easy without heating. All gears off:



      And I came to another couple of problems.

      Either someone had been in this transmission before (I doubt it), or the factory didn't properly cut the threads in the last inch or so of the shaft. I noticed when removing the big bolt holding the smaller gear in place, that the bolt was tough to back out all the way to the end (had to use a wrench all the way out), whereas the same bolt for the bigger gear came off by hand easy. After getting both bolts out and cleaning them up, sure enough, one of them has messed up threads in the bottom inch. Had to order a tap and die set on e-Bay so I can clean the threads up (M10x1.0 which is not a common size).

      Second problem is that the washer that came with my new gears is too big! I should have noticed this when I received them but I didn't think to look. The new washer is the same size as the old and as you can see in these pics, it will interfere with the gear. I contacted the place I bought the gears from to see if they will send me the right one. If not, I'll probably just grind this one down on the bench grinder and call it good

      New gear with new washer:
      Last edited by djnibler; 06-22-2013 at 09:37 PM.

    16. Member
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      07-01-2013 01:14 PM #16
      I took the transmission to a machine shop to have them fix the stripped out hole the right way (with weld and tap). My brother in law can't weld aluminum.

      Contacted the vendor about the washer and they didn't have an answer as to why the new one was too big but said prior to the new washer becoming available, everyone used to just grind down their old ones so that's what I'm going to do.

      As soon as the machine shop finishes fixing the stripped hole, I'll get back to work.

      Anyone have any good ideas on how to grind down the thrust washer, keeping it perfectly round? I don't have a lathe. I suppose it isn't critical for it be perfectly round as the forces so close to the center of the shaft should be low. I was just going to use a compass or something to scribe a line a few mms in from the edge and grind it down on the bench grinder to the line.

    17. Member
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      07-05-2013 07:51 PM #17
      Got the transmission back from the machine shop the other day so back at it.

      Used a drill and tap to clean up the threads in the input shaft as well as the bolt that holds the gear to it. Bolt worked great after I did that.

      Today I finished the gear swap and buttoned up the transmission. Now it's ready for the swap. All I'm waiting on at this point is my starter and brake fluid hose (for the clutch master cylinder) which should arrive early next week. I may do the conversion next weekend depending on what else is going on.

      So I last left off with the gears fully removed. The first step is to slide the output shaft gear into place, then put the spring washer on and tighten the bolt down to 59 ft/lbs. I explained in a previous post about the washer being too large. I just ground it down on a bench grinder to where there were a couple mm of clearance to the gears. You can see the grind marks on it in this pic and get an idea of how much I took off compared to the other pics of it. It doesn't have to be exact.


      To remove the bolts for the gears and to re-install them, you have to lock the input/output shafts. I did it with a home-made tool. You can see it just locks the driveshaft flanges. Locking the output shaft is enough because the output gear will also lock the input shaft gear once installed:


      Once the output shaft gear is in place, slide the needle bearing and input shaft gear and brass synchro ring into place, then install the hub of the synchro ring. I heated mine in a 400 degree oven for a while to let it get hot and expand. It was still difficult to get on. I set it on the shaft and tapped it down with a big socket and hammer. Had to bang on it a fair amount before it finally hit its resting point. One important thing to note for this step: the synchro hub has six slots. Three of them hold the lock fingers and three of them allow the three nubs on the brass synchro ring to fit inside. When you are putting the hub back on, ensure the three large slots are aligned with the nubs on the brass ring. Also ensure the spring clip is on the back side of the hub (and covering the three small slots where the fingers go.

      Here is a pic of everything installed except the outer ring:


      Slide the outer ring in place to lock the gears together and tighten the input shaft gear bolt to 59 ft lbs.

      This really blurry picture shows the shift fork re-installed.


      Put the new gasket in place then re-install the end cap and you are finished. Note that I used new bolts so the broken bolt thing wouldn't happen again if I ever had to take the 5th gear housing out:


      That's it for now. The next posts should detail the Automatic to Manual swap.
      Last edited by djnibler; 07-06-2013 at 08:04 AM.

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      07-07-2013 10:02 AM #18
      Automatic is almost out of the car. Hoping to get it out today, as well as replace the rear main seal, install clutch/pp/flywheel, and at least get the manual tranny bolted into place and on the mounts.

      I didn't take a lot of pictures of the removal process because it is pretty straight forward.

      Get the radiator out in service position (four bolts):


      Drain the coolant. There is a metal coolant pipe running in front of the transmission/engine. It has a bolt on the bottom of it with a copper crush washer. Remove the bolt to drain the coolant.

      While vehicle is on the ground, loosen the wheel bolts and driveshaft bolt.
      Jack the car up, put on jack stands, remove wheels
      Undo the lower ball joints by removing the two bolts that hold them to the spindle (16mm socket) - Don't remove the big lower bolt.
      Remove the bolt holding the sway bar and lower shock to the lower control arm.
      Remove the rear transmission mount (it is the item on the far right in this picture)

      Now remove the driveshaft bolts that hold the CV joint to the driveshaft flange on the transmission. Use a really long extension to do this. Put transmission into neutral. To keep the driveshaft from spinning, stick a screwdriver into one of the vents on the disc brake so when you loosen the inner driveshaft bolts, it causes the screwdriver to wedge against the caliper. I love this trick There is really only one good spot to access the bolts so after you remove one, you need to rotate the driveshaft to bring the next one into view.
      To remove the driveshaft, turn the steering wheel all the way toward the side you are working on and then put a jack under the rotor, then jack it up a bit. You should be able to pull the driveshaft out of the hub.
      To get the inner part of the driveshaft out, you need to push the engine forward. The rear mount is off now so just stick a breaker bar or jack handle between the subframe and engine/trans and pry it forward a couple inches which gives you enough clearance to work the inner CV clear and remove driveshaft.

      After that, remove starter and ATF dipstick. Disconnect all electrical lines to the transmission which, from memory, include the multi function switch toward the back of the transmission and a plug near the front of the transmission as well as a couple of grounds. Unbolt the metal coolant pipe from its braces on the transmission. Disconnect the shift linkage and unbolt it from it's support brace. Unbolt any wiring harness clamps and move them out of the way. Disconnect the speedo cable from the connector near the firewall, and from the transmission be careful not to loose the plastic bushing at the transmission end). From what I can tell, the A/T speedo cable is the same as the M/T cable. Be very careful as this part is now obsolete and there is no aftermarket option available that I'm aware of. Obsolete parts really make me Some of the coolant hoses are obsolete now as well. And speaking of coolant hoses, remove every coolant hose in the area (engine oil cooler to metal pipe, all the hoses to the heater core, and all the hoses to the transmission oil cooler).

      At this point, the transmission is ready to come out.

      To remove the manual gear shifter, remove the allen bolt holding the shift knob in place, then pull the knob and the covers up and off. Remove the four or so Phillips screws you can see. Remove all seven bolts from the under side of the vehicle (there is one in back of the box that you can't see in the pic):


      Remove electrical connectors and use a screwdriver to pry off the starter lock cable fitting (you can see it hanging free on the left side of this pic):


      The shifter now just drops out leaving a hole where the new manual shifter will go.

      I'll detail the complete removal of the starter lock cable when I complete that.

      I forget how hard it is on the neck to lay on your back for hours at a time holding your head up off the ground. A few more cups of coffee and some advil and I'll be back at it.

    19. Member
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      07-07-2013 08:07 PM #19
      Removing the transmission turned out to be a lot more challenging than I had anticipated

      I realized that my usual ghetto method of supporting an engine while the transmission is being removed (by using a jack and a block of wood) wasn't going to work on the eurovan because the engine leans so far forward. Had I just used a jack, the engine may likely have rocked forward and crashed into the radiator or core support. The Bentley shows you using a slick and overly complicated adjustable metal brace that bolts to the lower part of the engine block and allows you to move the engine forward or backward (which you need to do when removing the transmission).

      A trip to Harbor Freight and $225 later, and I am the proud owner of an engine crane. I had one many years ago but after using it once, it just took up space so I sold it for cheap to a friend. I think I'll hold onto this one.

      I used adjustable webbing straps with hooked ends to hook onto the engine (there is a bracket on the rear of the block that also has a hook to support the oil cooler hose), and on the front there is actually a hole built into the block for supporting via a crane. With the crane, you can move the engine forward and down which is required.




      When removing an automatic, you have to disconnect the flex plate from the torque converted before removing the transmission. There are two bolts on the back side of the engine that bolt the engine to the transmission and also hold a cover in place. In the drawing below, they are bolts #1. With those removed, you can see the edge of the spring plate. There are three nuts you need to remove. Use a wrench on the engine pulley bolt to turn the engine slowly until one of the nuts comes into view then remove and continue until all three are off.

      Note the bolts and their location. All of these need to be removed to pull the transmission. #7 is very easy to miss. Bolts #1 and #7 are the only two that screw in TOWARD the transmission (they screw into the transmission instead of into the engine). #7 is an allen head bolt.



      The Bentley says to disconnect the down-pipe at the exhaust manifold. I had to completely remove the down pipe in order to give myself enough room to get at the #1 and #7 bolts, in addition to the flex plate nuts.

      Don't forget to remove the mounting bracket that bolts the right-side of the transmission to the engine block just below the oil filter (it bolts to the "trumpet" extension of the transmission). Unbolt it from both the block and the transmission.

      I had a transmission jack in my garage that I also bought at Harbor Freight a year or two ago when I did the clutch on my GF's Subaru, so I used that here. Lower the jack and the engine crane so the transmission clears the unibody and sub-frame and pull the trans apart from the engine. This happened really easily (I had to PRY the Subaru trans off and it took hours). Once freed from the engine, the little horn bracket is really in the way and can't be un-bolted. I ended up having to jack the car as high as I could and pull the ATF dipstick tube which, of course, sent ATF spewing everywhere.



      This was one of the hardest transmission removals I've done. Even the AWD Subaru was easier than this. Glad to have the thing out!

    20. Member bigfatgeek's Avatar
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      07-08-2013 08:14 AM #20
      Great update - again. Thank you for putting the effort not only into the swap, but documenting it for us.

    21. Member
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      07-10-2013 08:59 AM #21
      Oops.

      I tried to install a new rear main seal last night and managed to ruin it in the process. Originally the vans came with a standard-style seal (rubber ring with a lip and a spring inside the lip to keep tension on it... same kind you'd see for wheel bearing seals) but they have now converted that over to a "PTFE" seal which is different. It is also much more fragile. The seal comes with a tool that allows you to install it correctly, but no instructions so I botched it and ruined the seal. If you bend or tweak the lip of the seal at all, it actually stays that way and there is no recovering it.

      After some googling, I now understand how the tool that came with the seal works (though it is shaped differently from the ones I saw in google searches) so when the new one comes in tomorrow, I'll make sure to detail the use very clearly and take lots of pics to save others from the same trouble.

      Here is what it looks like. The plastic thing in the center is the installation tool:


      A new OEM seal is $150! I was lucky a month ago and found an actual OEM seal on eBay for $30 new in box but there aren't any more at that price now and even if there were, I need the thing tomorrow so I can get this show back on the road so I'm having to get one from the dealer.

      One other thing to note: There is a paper gasket behind the old seal housing but the new style seal housing has a built in rubber gasket so you don't need the replace the paper seal (according to what many say online but there is nothing official anywhere that details this... not that I have found anyway). The bottom of the seal housing actually seals against the oil pan gasket.

      On an unrelated note.... there is no pilot bushing in the flywheel or crankshaft for the manual transmission input shaft to ride in. However, ETKA shows there is a "bushing" in the crankshaft for cars with an automatic transmission. I can't figure out if that needs to be removed or not and can't even figure out if it is actually there (if it is, it is pressed into the crank in such a way that makes it look like it is a part of the crank). The ETKA part number shows as 023105329 but the Bentley mentions nothing about it. I searched the EV_Update yahoo group and found one guy talking about it and it sounded like he drilled it out of the crank. Another guy said the input shaft doesn't even reach the crank so you don't have to worry about it.

      Last night I took a clutch disc alignment tool, verified it is the same diameter as the very tip of the manual transmission input shaft (where there are no splines) and tried to insert it into the hole in the end of the crankshaft. It fit perfectly. Tonight or tomorrow I'm going to try mating the transmission to the engine without the flywheel or clutch parts in place, just to see if it fits in all the way. If it does, I'm going to call it good and assume there isn't a bushing in there that I need to deal with.

    22. Member
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      07-10-2013 05:48 PM #22
      After some more research and testing, I have discovered the following:

      There is no pilot bearing/bushing for the 02B manual transmission.

      There is a bushing pressed into the end of the crankshaft for vans with an automatic transmission. You can see it here in this pic (the bushing is more oxidized than the crankshaft):


      It doesn't seem that the inside diameter of the bushing is the issue.... the issue is the outside diameter. The OD is just too big to allow the flywheel to fit over it. So the bushing needs to be removed. I can feel the back of the bushing through the hole so a proper pilot bearing puller tool may be able to get it out but I don't have such tool. I'm going to see if the auto parts store has one in their loan-a-tool program and if not, I am going to drill it out, being careful to use a drill bit that is small enough that it won't contact the crank. I read of someone doing this and apparently a 7/8" drill bit is perfect size (smaller than the hole in the crank but bigger than the bushing... enough so that after drilling out to 7/8" you can split it with a chisel).

    23. Member
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      07-10-2013 08:45 PM #23
      The bushing is out and the pilot bushing puller tool worked. Both Autozone and O'Reilly Auto Parts carry everything you need in their free loaner tool program. All you need is a 5lb slide hammer and the bushing puller tool.

      Here are two examples of the same puller tool (same tool, different brand). One is an OEM 27059 and the other is a EverTough 67033. Probably made by the same company


      The only thing to note is that you have to grind down the tips of the puller a little bit on a bench grinder or they won't fit inside the bushing. They are just maybe 1-2mm too wide.

      Here is the puller installed into the bushing. Tighten it good, but not crazy tight or the excess friction against the crankshaft will make it harder to get the bushing out:


      Pic showing slide hammer attached to the puller tool. The real key is to pull hard on the handle of the slide hammer with one hand while operating the slide weight with the other hand. If you just use the slide weight, it doesn't do much. I had to pull as hard as I could and bang the weight as hard as I could for a good minute or so. I really thought it wasn't going to come out but it did.








      With this bushing out of the way, the flywheel fits perfectly on to the end of the crankshaft.

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      07-11-2013 07:53 AM #24
      Very interesting stuff, particularly the bush in the end of the crank. I had read about it before but now with the pics & details it is now clear. Please keep the details coming.

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      07-11-2013 08:54 AM #25
      I don't think I ever detailed what is needed from a parts stand point so here goes from memory.... I will come back and edit this as I remember or discover more:

      Parts needed (new or from donor van)
      - Manual Transmission
      - Left (driver’s side) driveshaft (can buy new aftermarket for ~$100 or take from donor van)
      - Rear Motor/Trans Mount (very early model 93’s had a funky rear mount and I can’t detail that in the swap since mine is the later style). The auto rear mount looks the same as the
      - Pedal cluster assembly (you really only need the clutch pedal, pivot pin, spring, cruise control vent valve, wiring for cruise control vent valve, clutch master cylinder and hydraulic line all the way to the trans)
      - Flywheel, pressure plate, clutch, throwout bearing
      - Clutch slave cylinder
      - Starter
      - Master cylinder fluid reservoir (has an outlet for the clutch master cylinder). You can re-use the donor hose or buy new. If you buy new, ensure you get BRAKE FLUID hose. It’s blue, and fuel hose or other non-brake fluid hose will degrade over time and leak brake fluid all over your interior. Not worth it! Can get the hose on e-Bay or dealer, thought the part number for the hose in ETKA was on national back order when I tried to order it.
      - Shifter and all shift linkage between it and the transmission including the shift box and all associated parts
      - Electrical connector for reverse light switch (connects to transmission).
      - Metal coolant pipe on the front of the engine. It's black, about 1/2" around, has one end near the thermostat and the other end over the top of the transmission. The mounts are different between auto and manual. If you can weld, you can cut off and re-weld mounts that will work. Otherwise, you need to use the pipe from the donor vehicle or buy a new one. New they are ~$200 from the dealer. Not available aftermarket. Definitely try to get this from the donor vehicle. If you do end up having to order it, the correct part number is 074121065Q for '93 vans but there are four types available depending on year, and also depending on whether your van has the "supplemental heater." I don't know what "supplemental heater" means but it is NOT the additional rear heater that comes in the MV. I know because I ordered that pipe and it was wrong.
      - Starter bolts: M8x40 1.25 allen bolts for starter. Need 3 of them.
      - 2x M12 bolts, nuts, and washers for the cover plate and bolting the engine to the transmission near the back.
      - Support bracket for speedo cable (bolts to top of transmission)



      Some things I currently believe or know are the same and will confirm when the job is finished:
      - Metal Spacer that is sandwiched between the engine and transmission (different part numbers in ETKA but they look to me to be exactly the same when compared in person)
      - Cover plate that covers the access hole in the back of the block that allows access to the torque converter bolts on the flex plate.
      - Speedo cable
      - Right side driveshaft
      - Side transmission mount


      Current unknowns:
      ECU. This is the biggest unknown for me right now. I’ve only found a couple of posts anywhere about this, none of it detailed, and much of it contradicting. Some say the ECU is different for Auto vs Manual and others say you can use the auto ECU in a manual conversion. One guy said you have to swap the throttle body because the throttle position sensor is different between auto and manual ECUs, and I believe the statement about the TPS being different is accurate, but I don’t know that the part about HAVING to swap it is correct; I think if you are swapping the ECU and wiring harness (using what you pull from the donor van), then yes, you would have to swap the TB and TPS…. But I think the TB/TPS setup for the automatic may work with the manual conversion.

      Per the wiring diagram, there are only three wires that connect the ECU to the TCU and of them, two are bridged at the diagnostic connector which lead me to believe they just send/receive data when connected to a code-reader like a VAG-COM.

      To further complicate the wiring, ALL wiring diagrams in the Bentley show the TCU in place. But in many places, they put a * next to some wires, or make other wires dashed-lines to denote that they are for automatic or manual transmission only, however, they don’t do this for the TCU or any of the wires to it. I’m going to simply unplug the TCU and see if the van starts and runs fine. If it doesn’t, I read where one guy said he got it to work by leaving the TCU plugged in, then removing the multifunction switch from the automatic transmission and simply plugging it into the wiring harness connector in the engine compartment. If I can’t figure out a better way, I’ll certainly try this.

      I do know that you have to change up some wiring around the PNP (Park/Neutral Position Relay) to get the van to start, and also to get the reverse lights to work. I already know what I need to do there based on the wiring diagrams and I will make sure to cover it in detail when I get to that part of the swap. It should be a very clean update (moving existing terminals from the back of the relay to specific pins on the back of the fuse box….. sounds more complicated than it is).
      Last edited by djnibler; 07-31-2013 at 08:51 AM.

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      07-13-2013 10:01 PM #26
      The new rear main seal arrived from the dealer and it is different than the one I bought on e-Bay. The dealer seal matches what was on the car, and requires a gasket (which came with it in the box). The seal looks like a standard radial seal (with the spring sitting inside the lip to help keep tension), as opposed to what I believe is a PTFE seal. From now on, for something like a rear main seal, I think it's good insurance to get the part from the dealer even if it's more expensive. Cheap insurance from having to take the transmission out when you find out the aftermarket one you bought is leaking.

      This is the new rear main seal:


      This is the tool that came with both the eBay seal and the dealer seal:


      You can see the lip that has a larger outside diameter. Put this on the crankshaft with the wider part facing the engine, then slide the deal on over it and into place. The bottom of the seal's metal housing is sealed by the oil pan gasket. To make sure it didn't leak, I added a bead of the white VW fast-dry silicone sealant. The bolts get torqued to 7ft lbs.


      Next the flywheel goes on. The bolts are stretch bolts so always replace them. I made a quick tool to lock the flywheel which you can see in this pic below. Flywheel bolts get torqued to 60 Newton Meters then an additional 90 degrees.


      Clutch and pressure plate installed. 15 ft lbs on the pressure plate bolts. Use a clutch disc alignment tool. I believe the tool is specific to an 02B but I didn't have one of those so used the normal VW kind and it worked though it didn't have a perfect fit into the crankshaft. As long as the transmission can align with it, it's ok.


      Mating the transmission to the engine:


      Aside from it being very difficult to align and get mated (would have been very hard to do without the transmission jack allowing me to fine tune the angles), I did notice one difference between the manual and automatic. The two bolts that hold the cover plate in place (and also help bolt the engine/trans together) screwed into the transmission from the engine side on the automatic transmission. In the manual, there are no threads in the transmission for those holes so it looks like there is supposed to be a nut on there. So you'll need two M12 nuts.

      Hopefully more to come tomorrow.
      Last edited by djnibler; 07-13-2013 at 10:03 PM.

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      07-14-2013 05:07 AM #27
      Everything looks very tidy where you are working, very little rust etc.
      With ref. to post #17, in addition to the new screws, did you use any anti seize on the threads?
      What is the red paint mark on the flywheel for?
      After buying the second crank seal it looks like any standard seal from a bearing supply co,[at a fraction of the VW price]could have been used, although you wouldn't get the installation sleeve.
      Was there any groove worn in the crank where the seal sits?
      Keep up the posting.

    28. Member
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      07-14-2013 08:50 AM #28
      The car is originally from Georgia and I am the third owner so it has stayed around here. Very little rust on cars in this area.

      I did not use anti-seize on the threads of the bolts holding the gears in place because I felt it might interfere with the torque values. Any lubricant on threads will mean you have to tighten harder to get the same torque and usually they don't use anti-seize for engine and transmission internals. However, now that you brought it up, I probably should have used some for those bolts that hold the transmission cover plate on so I don't end up with another bolt snap. Hopefully I will never have to take that plate off again though.

      No idea on the flywheel red paint mark. Machine shop may have put that on there as part of the re-surfacing? *shrug* I can say that the crank and flywheel have a hole or two that are offset-drilled so you can only install the flywheel one way (takes care of alignment for you). Set the flywheel on the crankshaft and just keep turning it until all the bolt holes align.

      You are right about the seal.... just the standard type. As for the crank, no, there was no groove. Felt brand new (van has 166k miles on it).

      Hoping to get most of the under-hood stuff wrapped up today. After that I just have to tackle the wiring.

    29. Member
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      07-14-2013 10:53 AM #29
      I forgot to detail the starter bushing replacement.

      To get the old one out, run a 1/2" tap into it. The tap will bottom out on the transmission and if you keep turning, it will back the old bushing out. I've seen other write-ups for VWs say to use an 11mm or 7/16" tap but the 02B in the EV must use a bigger bushing because those were too small. 1/2" is perfect... just bigger than the ID of the bushing but smaller than the OD so it doesn't eat into the transmission.

      Tap the new one in place with a hammer and whatever you have that is flat.... small piece of hardwood or something.

    30. Member
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      07-14-2013 08:14 PM #30
      Didn't get as much done today as I would have liked but I still made progress.

      Couple of things learned today:

      The metal coolant pipe shown in the picture below is specific to automatic vs manual transmission. This is because it has built-in support brackets that hold it to the transmission and brace it. The starter on the automatic uses 2 M10 bolts where as the manual starter uses 3 M8x40 1.25 bolts (so you'll have to by those from the hardware store or get from the donor van..... they are allen head). Anyway, the braces get in the way of things so for now I cut them off with a dremel. I'll probably rig up some sort of crude support until I can get the correct pipe. The support is very important because the coolant after-run pump hangs off the metal pipe and a major wiring harness clamps to it as well. There are a lot of wires and rubber hoses that it could rub on and wear. Looking at ETKA, there are 4 different pipes for manual transmissions. One for cars with the additional rear heater and one for cars without. There are vin splits for each. Mine is an MV so it has the rear heater but I'm not sure what the difference would be in this pipe.



      I also found out that the support bracket for the speedo cable is different between automatic vs manual transmissions. Speedo cable is the same but not the support. Here is a pic of the new one installed on the cable and the old one in hand:


      One other thing... don't install the clutch slave cylinder before bolting the transmission to the engine. It has an internal spring that pushes the release bearing arm forward and makes it harder for you to mate the engine and transmission.

      The big engine bolts (M12) get torqued down to 59 ft/lbs and the smaller ones (M8) to 18 ft lbs.

      Not much else to report from a learning standpoint. The transmission top mount is bolted into place. Down-pipe is bolted in (not fun... very hard to reach up there). Now I need to connect all the wires, hoses, bolt the driveshafts to the transmission, install shift linkage, do the wiring at the fuse box, fill with fluids and hopefully that's it.

      The two bolts that hold the lower ball joint to the lower control arm are stretch bolts and must always be replaced. You wouldn't want these breaking while you are driving. Torque them to 41 newton meters and then an additional 90 degrees.
      Last edited by djnibler; 07-31-2013 at 09:11 AM.

    31. Member
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      07-15-2013 01:27 AM #31
      Quote Originally Posted by djnibler View Post
      However, now that you brought it up, I probably should have used some for those bolts that hold the transmission cover plate on so I don't end up with another bolt snap. Hopefully I will never have to take that plate off again though.
      Yes, those are the ones I was referring to.
      You are fortunate not to have a groove in the shaft at that mileage. I replaced the front seal on my 2.5TDI at around 110,000KM & the groove forced me to leave the new seal out from fully home by a couple of mm

    32. Member
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      07-15-2013 12:45 PM #32
      Maybe the fact that I always use a high quality synthetic oil contributed to that? At least, that's what I'm going to tell myself so I can keep justifying $7 a quart oil

    33. Member
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      07-19-2013 09:33 PM #33
      Busy week as usual. Didn't get to do any work on the van until tonight.

      Removing the ignition lock is easy. You don't even have to do it really. Once you disconnect it from the auto-shifter, it will no longer lock the ignition. If you want to remove it, just remove the screws holding the lower steering column cover in place (3 screws), then remove the top cover too. Pry the cable end off with a screwdriver and pull the whole cable out of the car.



      To get at the wiring, remove the fusebox cover then pull the top of this little white clip AWAY from the side of the fuse box to disengage the pin, then pull it up and out.



      The relay with the yellow line pointing to it is the PNP (Park Neutral Position) relay which should only come on cars with automatics.


      The big red wire with the black stripe coming off the back of it needs to be connected to circuit 50 which has battery positive when the key is turned to the "start" position only. This wire goes out to the starter solenoid. The RIGHT way to connect it to circuit 15 is to pull it off the back of the relay block and then insert it into plug "F", terminal "1".

      The arrow here points to F1. There is a white and red wire in that terminal but it can be removed:


      The problem with doing this is that the red and black wire that comes off the back of the PNP relay terminal has a female spade connector with a locking tab. The plugs on the back of the fuse box itself don't accept that kind of connector. I forgot about that so need to go to the dealer at some point in the future to get a few of the right kinds of connectors. In the meantime, I just spliced it into the wire that goes directly to the key ignition. To splice it, I just removed some insulation on the big wire, cut the female spade off the end of the other two wires, stripped them, wrapped them around the big red and black wire, and then soldered and taped.



      Installing the shifter and linkage was very straight forward. Put it on the van the same way it came off. To set the side to side play, find a 10mm spacer and put it between the right side of the shift gate and the shift rod. Then wedge whatever you can on the other side to hold the shift rod against the right side spacer. These paintbrush handles I had in my garage were exactly 10mm in width. Worked perfectly.



      Here is the manual pedal cluster bracket.


      You need to remove the clutch master cylinder, hydraulic line, clutch pedal, clutch pedal spring, and all the cruise control hoses and valves. In the pic below, remove the clips holding the pins in and the pins will push out. One pin is for the clutch and brake pedals, the other is for the clutch master cylinder.



      All cars have holes in the firewall for the clutch fluid hose and for the hydraulic line. Just have to remove the rubber blocker grommets to expose the holes. Here is the new clutch master cylinder connected and ready to be bolted in.


      That's all for tonight. Not much left to do assuming all else goes well. I'm hoping to wrap up the job and take it for a victory lap tomorrow.

    34. Member
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      07-19-2013 10:16 PM #34
      Did you check the clutch pedal bracket for any cracks? I don't know if the LHD van suffer from the same problem as RHD but there is a guy on the T4 Forum that does a changeover service for the bracket. There was also an extended warranty by VW in the UK but not in Oz. Some owners had them replaced with new ones only to fail again in 12 months.[VW didn't improve/modify the bracket] The changeover that is done by Windwelder [forum member]as well as repaired is strengthened to prevent it breaking again.

    35. Member
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      07-20-2013 06:19 AM #35
      I didn't know about that issue; thank's for mentioning it. I'll make sure to take a look at the bracket today when I am in there finishing up the pedal cluster work.

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