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    Thread: g60 FAQ - Read this first!

    1. 02-06-2003 09:11 AM #1
      Hello everyone-

      At the request of the masses, here's an FAQ for the g60 forum. For now, most of the content will be copied out of the FAQ in the Corrado forum, but I'd love it if we could develop some more in-depth stuff to have in here. If anyone's willing to do writeups or pictorals on common (or not so common!) procedures, or anything like that, please let me know.

      g60 topics:
      -Rebuilding the g60 Charger
      -BOV's, the boost return hose, and related topics
      -Turbo conversions for the g60 Corrado
      -16v g60 Information
      -Checking the boost on your MFA, What boost you should have with different pullies, etc.
      -Overview of g60 modifications
      -4 lug to 5 lug conversion (ie, swapping the 5-lug setup from the SLC on to a g60)
      -Removing the g60 charger
      -Automatic to Manual transmission conversions
      -Removal of the bumper and stock intercooler
      -Motor mount options - OEM and aftermarket
      -Exhaust systems
      -Coolant Flushing
      -20v Head with PG block..


      -Nate


      Modified by SaabFan at 3:06 PM 2-6-2004


    2. Geriatric Member ValveCoverGasket's Avatar
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      02-06-2003 01:56 PM #2
      here nigels writeup on the g60 harness


      this harness is from a syncro passat but we used a Corrado bentley manual to figure out where everything goes. If you want a larger picture so you can read the labels better just ask and i will e-mail them to you.

      To get the harness to this stage i soaked the harness in superclean and HOT water. this made the insulation more flexable and removes the tape and dirt much easier.
      be carefull cutting the outer covering off

      any way here is the wiring key moving in a clock wise manner from the bottom left

      Fuel Rail-Brown/Yellow stripe, solid Red goes to #87 on the fuel pump relay

      Red/Green strip- goes to #50 recieves +12v during starting

      Terminal 1 on coil (negative -)- solid Green wire larger diameter, has a specific plug for the coil

      *Heated O2 sensor- solid purple (signal), soild black (ground), brown with black stripe (ground), Red with white stripe recieves power from #87 on the fuel pump relay

      AC- solid Green but small diameter wire with yellow plug (not to be confused with the coil negative) goes to a switch in the of the interior of car the lets the brain know to idle higher because of the increased drag of the AC compressor ( i will be deleting this from my harness but http://www.snstuning.com use it to activate some of the special features available on their custom chips)

      Knock Sensor-i did not label it because if you cannot recognize which connector it is you should not be attempting this project in the first place

      ISV or Idle Stabilizer Valve- Solid White/ Black with Yellow stripe recives power from #15 which is switched 12V +.
      The ISV can be succesfully eliminated for those looking to reduce the complexity of the harness, it will idle alittle rough on cold days however the blk/ylw wire will still need to be powered

      Air Temperature/CO potentiometer- Blue solid, Blue with White stripe, Brown with White stripe

      Throttle Switches- Brown with White stripe, Red with Black stripe (idle switch), Blue with Black stripe (Full throttle switch or Wide Open Throttle or WOT switch)

      Coolant Temperature Sensor- pretty blue plug, Brown with White stripe, Brown with Green stripe

      Distributor Hall Sensor- Brown with White stripe, Green with White stripe, Red with black stripe

      Yellow with Blue stripe, goes to #85 on fuel pump relay

      Brown and Brown with black stripe are grounds.


      *Note for those with passat harnesses- the black wire in the O2 sub harness is not grounded in the actual harness connection with the brain. But instead relies on a seperate ground in the engine bay. Corrado harnesses do groung this at the ecu connection plug. So don't use a corrado O2 sensor unless you go connect the ground at the head of the wire in the ecu connector plug.



      Modified by ValveCoverGasket at 5:38 PM 7-20-2005


    3. 02-06-2003 03:12 PM #3
      here's a bunch of part #'s and usefull parts i've compiled randomly...
      i claim nothing

      Guage panel in cuby hole
      535 858 201

      90mm front lip:
      535 805 903 B

      And of course the recent repost via Bob:

      Rallye U-Bend Outlet:
      191 145 755 B
      MWK2

      The part number for the A/C adapter is:
      191 145 755
      You also need one Gasket:
      030 145 119
      and one Screw (M8x28mm):
      N 900 422 01 (Contributed by G60ING)

      Also here is a # for an oil pressure transponder (sender) from a 90's Cabby
      035-919-561-A It is pricey though (Contributed by CVOVP)

      Porsche 944T intercooler part# 951-110-187-003

      3.5 Bar
      Porsche 944-S, 2.5L DOHC 16V, 190hp
      Bosch # 0 280 160 263
      (Call dealer for Porsche #)
      *This is sold with most Stage 2/3 kits

      3.8 Bar
      Porsche 944S2, 968; 3.0L DOHC 16V, 208hp
      Bosch # 0 280 160 287
      Porsche # 944 110 198 06

      30# Red top injectors:
      Bosch Part #: 0 280 150 945
      Ford motorsport part # F1SE-E1A

      g bypass belt
      Most autoparts stores...59.5 inch belt

      idle screw
      037 133 432

      roof gutters
      535-853-705 and 535-853-706 (right and left)

      starter
      Simply, First production = two bolt mount, and Second production = three bolt mount.

      u-bend
      The number is: 191 145 755 B
      Not available as far as I can tell.

      ABA oil pump
      027 115 105B

      passat cup holder
      #3A186253101C
      at vwparts.com

      redesigned wipers
      • Driver's side part number: 535-955-409-A
      • Passenger's side part number: 535-955-410-B

      62mm belt
      use a #685k6

      5k manifold
      Audi 5000 Turbo from 1986 - 1988. Earlier or later parts *might* work, or parts off different cars - I'm not completely familair with the Audi model changes. The manifold off a 1989 - 1990 200 might work, too. You basically want the manifold off the "MC" code engine, that's the 5 cylinder turbo engine they used in the Type 44 chassis from 1986 till 1990.
      *Oh, you need an 1983-84 Audi 5000 manifold.*

      rally i/c
      191 145 805G Rallye 1H engine code
      191 145 805H 2wd PG engine code

      non-ac waterpump pulley
      028 121 031E
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=244434

      You can find an oil cooler on just about any Turbo volvo. '81-'85 240 Turbo, '84-'92 700 series (740, 760, 780), or the '91-'95 940 Turbo.


    4. 02-06-2003 03:25 PM #4
      more #'s from ORZ about g60 internals
      once again i know nothing, i am blind
      removed prices to be fair to other rebuilders, blah blah blah
      just good luck finding all of these

      APEX Sealing Strips, short
      APEX Sealing Strips, long

      Please Note: Apex's are sold only in complete Set’s
      030 145 490C
      030 145 440C
      1.5X4.0X350mm (x4)
      1.5X4.0X525mm (x4)

      Housing, 1, empty
      037 145 407B

      Housing, 2, empty
      037 145 408B

      Main Shaft, complete
      037 145 422

      Bearing, D=32 (Secondary Shaft)
      *** 6002

      Bearing, D=42 (Secondary Shaft)
      *** 6003

      Bearing, D=52 (Housing 1 / Main Shaft)
      037 145 416
      *** 6304

      Needle Bearing, (Displacer / Secondary Shaft)
      037 145 481
      *** 310-7436AB

      Needle Bearing, D=35 (Housing 2 / Main Shaft)
      052 145 412
      *** NU202

      Needle Bearing, D=42 (Displacer / Main Shaft)
      037 145 475
      *** 10-6879A

      Secondary Shaft, complete
      037 145 421B

      Fitting Key, big (Balance Weight / Main Shaft)
      N101 261 01
      6X4X36

      Fitting Key, small (Balance Weight / Main Shaft)
      N101 262 01
      6X4X14

      Displacer, complete
      037 145 473B

      Shaft Sealing Ring, D=42 (Displacer / *** 10-6879A)
      030 145 413
      30X42X5.5/6 (x2)

      Shaft Sealing Ring, D=45 (Housing 1-outside / *** 6304)
      030 145 410
      30X45X6 (x1)

      Shaft Sealing Ring, D=52 (Housing 1-inside / *** 6304)
      030 145 414
      30X52X7/8 (x1)

      Shaft Sealing Ring, D=35 (Main Shaft / NU202)
      030 145 415
      20X35X7 (x1)

      Corrugated Spring (APEX Sealing Strips / Housing 1 & 2)
      052 145 439A
      1.2X0.2X520 (x4)

      Toothed Belt
      052 145 437R


    5. 02-06-2003 03:39 PM #5
      your words are like gold Nate, bling bling

      There are 4 different 02A trannies that will bolt up - two from g60 Corrados - the ATA that came on 1989's and 1990's, and the AYL that came on 91's and 92's.
      The 4-cyl Passat came with either an AYK or AGC tranny.

      As far as ratios, the final drive isn't the only difference between the 4. Sam's right, the difference between the common Corrado box (ATA, 3.64 final) and the common Passat box (AGC, 3.944 final) is only the final drive - the Passat has a shorter final, which means better acceleration at the cost of higher revs for a given speed and a lower top speed.

      But, the AYL and AYK trannies have more differences than just the final drive. They both have the taller 3.64 final drive from the ATA and the same gearset as eachother (AYL and AYK are more or less identical) but the gearset is different than the one used in the ATA and AGC. It's the same first gear, but shorter 2nd - 5th gears, so you more or less end up with ratios shorter than the ATA's - close to but a little teeny bit taller than the AGC's, but with a taller 1st gear.

      From tallest to shortest, here's the differences:
      ATA - 3.64 final and gearset most of us have
      AYK/AYL - 3.64 final but shorter gearset
      AGC - 3.944 final, and same gearset as ATA

      And if you were really creative, you could create a whole range of boxes by mixing the different individual cogs.

      Here's a chart of the gear ratios - first line for each box is the individual ratios, second line is the effective ratio (individual multiplied by final):

      _________Final______1_________2__________3________ 4________5
      ATA______3.684_____3.778_____2.105______1.345____0 .971_____0.795
      __________________13.918_____7.754______4.954____3 .577_____2.928

      AYL______3.684_____3.778_____2.118______1.429____1 .029_____0.838
      __________________13.918_____7.802______5.264____3 .790_____3.087

      AYK______3.684_____3.778_____2.118______1.429____1 .029_____0.838
      __________________13.918_____7.802______5.264____3 .790_____3.087

      AGC______3.944____3.778______2.105______1.345___0. 971_____0.795
      __________________14.900_____8.302______5.304____3 .829_____3.135

      -Nate (Saabfan)

      can you tell i'm bored today?


    6. 02-06-2003 05:02 PM #6
      BUY AN AIR FUEL GAUGE: http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?autofilter=1&part=SUM%2DG2986&N=700+115&autoview=sku or else.

      Compatible O2 sensors for cheap:
      86 V6 Taurus or 89 Mustang 5.0 see how to wire it up-->
      (preferred 89 mustang 5.0 long leaded, bosch 13953).
      http://www.corrado-club.com/faq/detail_faq.CFM?FAQID=25

      Modified by mrkrad at 7:42 PM 2-23-2007


      Modified by mrkrad at 8:08 PM 2-23-2007


    7. 02-07-2003 10:12 AM #7
      I'll add more later but this was good, Step by Step G60 supercharger inspection, courtesy of g60racer.

      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=668200&page=1


    8. 02-09-2003 05:54 PM #8

      Videos for broadband folks. Mostly entertainment:
      Video of prototype eaton compressor:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com/sbrown1/eaton.WMV
      Video of o2 sensor proper function (no-lag 11mg):
      http://home.test-afl.tulix/sbrown1/o2/o2high.wmv
      Similar but smaller video:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com/sbrown1/o2/nolag.WMV



      Modified by mrkrad at 7:44 PM 2-23-2007

    9. 02-17-2003 09:56 AM #9
      Thanks for all the posts everyone. As soon as I get some spare time I'll organize this better and put a TOC of links up.

      Keep it coming!

      -Nate


    10. Member fastg60's Avatar
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      02-17-2003 11:36 AM #10
      quote:
      Danny doing something video:
      http://www.snstuning.com/danny2.VMW

      no worky even if you make it wmv instead of vmw....



    11. 03-04-2003 07:31 PM #12
      Everything you ever wanted to know about your FPR:

      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=733854

      -Nate



    12. 03-21-2003 09:39 AM #14
      [NOTE: I live in the south where it's damn hot all the time. Some of you folks up North may not want to run such heavy oil when it's -30 outside. I would definitely recommend using the heaviest oil your climate allows.]

      Here's a checklist for when the oil pressure warning sounds. A lot of people say it only comes on when cornering. I fought with this for about 3 years on and off -- on both mine and PoweredbyG60's cars - so feel I've tried almost everything. Some of the G60 experts may scorn, but this has to be one of the suckiest problems when you're a new G60 owner.
      These are in order of simplicity. Eliminate the easy stuff first. Even if it doesn't help, hey it never hurts to have new oil

      1. Oil and oil filter -- 20W50. Even though I recently forgot this. With lighter oil you will see lower oil pressures and possibly hear some valve chatter. Use the OEM filter. I tried several brands, only the OEM stopped the idiot light flashing.

      2. Oil pressure switches -- There are two. One on top of the oil filter housing and one on the right side of the head. I thought the ones from Autozone would work fine -- they don't. Most of the third party switches will be marked with a single pressure value. The OEM ones operate over a pressure range. They don't cost a fortune and again, can't hurt to take them out of the equation. Also, check the wiring to the pressure senders. After fixing my oil pressure problem, the warning and idiot light both went off driving to work this morning. Gauges reads good but I pull over to check anyway. The yellow wire from the sender on top of the oil filter housing is hanging free. Everytime it touched against the block and grounded the warning went off. (Or maybe it's the other way round.) Anyway, check for bad connections.

      056 919 081E -- 1.8 Bar, White

      068 919 081 -- 1.2 - 1.6 Bar, Black

      068 919 081A -- 1.9 Bar, Brown

      Still looking -- 0.25 Bar, Blue

      3. Oil pump snorkel may be blocked -- When I dropped my oil pan I found that somehow the plastic baffle was broken and bits of it had been chewed up by the crank. Plastic shavings completely blocked the feeder tube for the pump. Thank God there's a screen there.

      4. Rod bearings -- by this point, I hope you've installed an oil pressure gauge to confirm your low pressure. If so and you're showing 0psi at idle you may have spun a bearing (thanks Sam). If you show 0 psi when driving STOP DRIVING. Rod bearings are not too difficult to replace and it's a good way to get acquainted with some of the internal workings of your engine.

      034 105 701 -- Rod Bearing

      5. Oil pump -- I have been reliably informed by G60ing that it's unusual for a G60 oil pump to go bad. If it does, they're pretty pricey. There's an 8V oil pump you can use that about $100 cheaper http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=562268.

      037115105 -- G60 Oil Pump

      6. If after all that you still have verified low oil pressure, you're looking at possibly bad main bearings or maybe even worse. I've never had to take it this far so all I can suggest is and


      [Modified by Blown6T, 8:37 AM 4-9-2003]


    13. Member Strictly Gravy's Avatar
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      03-31-2003 12:23 PM #15
      rebuild your charger.......
      here are the rebuilders: (alphabetical order)
      http://www.bahnbrenner.com
      http://www.gruvenauto.com
      http://www.kompressorkanada.ca
      http://www.orz-motorsports.com

      -Greg
      ps: this is a bump



      [Modified by Strictly Gravy, 4:26 PM 4-2-2003]


    14. Member G60ING's Avatar
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      04-04-2003 06:07 AM #16
      How to ship your charger:
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=780852
      Insure for $2500-$3000 as that is what it costs for a NEW charger
      And let it be said use Fedex (express or ground) or UPS. But do not use USPS as they do not insure the full amount of replacment


      [Modified by G60ING, 6:08 AM 4-4-2003]

    15. Member G60ING's Avatar
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      04-08-2003 09:54 AM #17

    16. 04-11-2003 10:52 AM #18
      When your charger bites the dust but you need to drive:
      G60 Emergency Bypass Instructions

      originally submitted by Yosh Hakutani to the CCA website

      edited by cbgthor for Vortexers

      Items needed:

      1. 13mm socket + 13mm wrench

      2. phillips and flathead screwdrivers

      3. Jack/Jackstand will make things easier

      4. 59.5 inch serpentine belt. Any local autoparts store will be able to get you one. Just tell them the specific length you need.

      5. Gloves or towel (optional)

      6. duct tape/racer tape, always comes in handy

      7. cone filter (optional, unless you don't mind having the air run through the dead/not spinning charger, through the intercooler, and finally into the intake mani. However, very necessary if your charger spit pieces of metal into the pipes)

      8. Rubber Mallet - may come in handy, either for getting the tensioner off or taking out your frustration about the blown g-lader on the blown g-lader

      >Procedure 1:

      1. remove the nut @ the top of the serpentine belt tensioner. wearing the gloves, push down on the tensioner while rocking it back and forth towards the passenger side. Rubber mallet works too and doesn't hurt it. The tensioner will come off.

      2. remove the airbox

      3. jack up the passenger side and place the jackstand firmly.

      4. >Remove the water-pump/power-steering belt. There are 2 nuts perpendicular and 1 nut that will remove the tension - (all 13mm).
      -OR-
      >Just remove the power steering pump pulley to get the v-belt off. Three allen wrench bolts.

      5. Look at how the serpentine belt routes itself around the crank pulley, ac compressor, alternator, and the supercharger. (diagrams in the Bentley manual if you forget) All we will be doing is to bypass the supercharger. In essence, from the top of the AC compressor, we loop around one of the idler pulleys and go to the alternator.
      It's really pretty self explanatory. It's exactly like it was with the charger, except it doesn't loop up to the charger. Either make note of its path beforehand or use the Bentley manual

      6. Use the 59.5 in serpentine belt and reverse the instructions.


      >Procedure 2 - if your g-lader has blown up and sent bits into the intercooler

      You're going to need some more tools for this.

      1. Remove the rubber elbow between the intake / throttle body and the outlet pipe from the intercooler. does it have metal in it? no? great! Go to #2. yes? you probably got some metal into the engine. bad news. I don't know what you should do at this point - tow the car?

      2. Remove the outlet pipe from the intercooler - to get to the clamp, you may need to remove some of the wheel well housing as well as the driver's side brake cooling duct.

      3. Roll the duct/racer tape around the rubber intake pipe. (on the end that was attached to the outlet pipe from the intercooler) The idea is to build the hose up to where it will match the diameter of the cone filter so that you can attach it directly to the intake, bypassing the clogged intercooler and blowing metal into the engine. Alternatively, I suppose you could attach the airbox directly to the intake...Might be limited on space though.

      "A long term issue is what to do with the PCV valve blow off oil. You could pipe from the valve into an secured oil bottle - just empty it out everyonce in a while."

      general discussion on the topic if you're not convinced:
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=620232
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=264041
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=240171
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=206674
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=140036
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=361229

      With determination and patience, and a trunk of the right tools, this can be done on the side of the road. I used to keep all the stuff I need for this in my trunk, purely out of paranoia.

      I guess this is more for the youngin's like myself, I'm sure all the pros wouldn't have to think twice about it



      Modified by cbgthor at 6:57 PM 6-15-2005


    17. 07-06-2003 10:05 PM #19
      Here's a writeup I did on replacing stock boost tubes with Eurosport tubes (90 G60 only). The links are to various pics of the procedure.

      What you will need:

      6mm socket
      8mm socket
      10mm socket
      12mm socket
      various 1/4" and 3/8" drive extensions (the longer the better)
      needle nose pliers
      phillips and flat screwdriver
      shop rags

      This was a fairly easy procedure, a 2 or 3 on a scale of 1-10, 10 being the hardest. Anyone who tinkers around with their car will have no problem doing this. There's not too much you can screw up.

      You can probably do this w/o removing the l/f wheel and brake duct, but it would make life a hell of a lot easier.

      Here's the old tubes

      ... and the new tubes before they go on the car:


      1. Disconnect battery
      2. Remove battery from car
      3. Loosen wheel lugs on l/f wheel
      4. Jack up car and place jack stand underneath
      5. Remove l/f wheel
      6. Remove single phillips and two 10mm bolts inside fender well
      7. Remove one 10mm bolt from front of brake duct (on passenger front side of duct)
      8. Pull duct out
      9. Loosen bottom clamps on both boost tubes (near the intercooler) using either 6mm socket or flat screwdriver
      10. Loosen top clamps on both boost tubes (from top of engine compartment) using either 6mm socket or flat screwdriver
      12. Remove 10mm bolt on midway tab connected to fan shroud on front tube
      13. Remove old front boost tube
      14. Remove grommet from old boost tube and place into new boost tube
      15. Install new boost tube - installation is reverse of removal
      16. Disconnect electrial connector on co_pot on rear boost tube
      17. Remove 10mm bolt on midway tab connected to unibody ledge on rear tube
      18. Remove old rear boost tube
      19. Carefully remove co_pot from old boost tube as to not damage the o-ring. If o-ring
      looks damaged, replace with a new one.
      20. Place co_pot in new tube
      21. Remove grommet from old boost tube and place into new boost tube
      22. Install new rear boost tube - installation is the reverse of removal
      23. Install brake duct - installation is reverse of removal
      24. Install battery and reconnect
      25. Install l/f wheel
      26. Remove jackstand, lower car and torque wheel lugs

      New tubes in the car...

      You're done! Enjoy your new boost tubes!


      Kim


    18. Member SSj4G60's Avatar
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      07-12-2003 06:50 PM #20
      Serp 6 rib 65"

      Vbelt 26.5"

      use 15mm spacer for where power steering attaches to accesory bracket


    19. Member zedcorrado's Avatar
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      08-29-2003 04:09 PM #21
      Replacement WOT and Idle Switches

      Instead of dropping $75-$150 on a new set of throttle position switches, you can buy these nifty replacements. I have used one on my car for about 9 months w/o a problem.

      the switches can be purchased from mouser electronics
      part number: 653-D2SW-3L1MS >> $4.30
      it can be found on the following catalog page at the bottom of the page.
      http://www.mouser.com/catalog/615/706.pdf

      it is watertight and heat resistant. it comes w/ the little arm (lever) on it which is good for the WOT switch, but I pulled it off of mine since I was doing a Idle switch replacement. it has mounting holes on it that line up to the stock mounting points, I used little screws and nuts to hold it there. be aware that it come with 3 leads...one is common, one it normally closed, one is normally open...so just figure out (it's labeled) which is the normally open one and cut the other lead off. good luck, and IM me if you need help



    20. 09-02-2003 09:21 AM #22
      I'm not sure how long this update will last, but newbies, or others, please please, do the basic homework on your car before asking the same old questions.

      1. Check the ECU-TB Vacuum line (And all others for damage on ends or in middle).
      2. Do obvious tune up stuff (plugs,wires,knock,o2,blue cts) before...
      3. BUY A FREAKIN A/F GAUGE (seriously, please, by god, buy one), it helps SO much to know you've done the basics and have an air fuel gauge (and boost gauge) to backup any claims of poor running.

      An example might be:
      I'm getting low MPG, i've replaced everything includig the timing belt, but my air fuel gauge is reading rich all the time, my vacuum is at 5hg at idle. I have no power?

      Poor Example:
      My car started bucking, what is wrong?

      Alot of messages end up being the usual protocol of did you try this and that, however, i noticed ALOT of the messages start off with extremely vague questions.

      Do not forget:
      RPM (start,idle,cruise,wot,part throttle,high,low)
      Temps(cold,warm,hot,overheating)
      Distance (immediate,after a short bit, after a long while).
      A/f gauge behaviour (cycling, randomly pegging, lean, rich always)
      Manifold pressure (boost gauge, at idle, cruise, max boost).
      What I haven't changed but should have at this mileage.
      What I have changed recently.

      If i forgot anything,mods,anyone please feel free to add more, but please be VERY Detailed in your questions. It saves alot of typing and guessing. You may be frustrated at the time, go kick your tires, then calm down and replay all the variables in your head when the problem occurrs, it certainly will help us help you get to the problem alot quicker without a dozen guesses.

      If you don't have a boost/a&f gauge, well see above in this faq. Money well worth every cent. And the boost gauge is built into your cluster if you are really hard up, but the a/f isn't.

      Cheers


    21. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
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      09-23-2003 10:38 PM #23
      Last edited by REPOMAN; 06-20-2011 at 10:47 PM.
      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GKS...80UVORSMiYMNQg

    22. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
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      11-07-2003 12:24 AM #24
      Boost curve: Where is boost produced, peaky vs. early or broad. Ranking: Lysholm screw-type SC, vain-style turbo, Roots, classic turbo(?), Centrifugal SC last.
      Lag: How much time between gas pedal application and noticeable boost. THis is significant at low rpms. Ranking: Lysholm screw-type SC, vain-style turbo, Roots, classic turbo(?). Centrifugal SC has very little boost below 3K.

      Here is the Official list , it probably needs to be Updated
      so you know the rules , put up or shut up. if it isn't on the list
      then there full of sh it. so if you wnat on post you dyno and we will add you.

      G60 Top 20 Lists All ##are at the wheels
      1.G60Jetta2dr
      1.8l 8v P&P Stage 4 15psi fmic
      190.0hp/203.0tq
      Avg = 196.5

      2. G60 247 (G60)HIGHEST 8v hyd G60
      Stage 4+, 65mm, 81.5mm bore, headwork, 30#, GIAC
      190.1hp/198.1tq
      Avg = 194.1

      3. Fast_bunny
      1.8l 8v g60 stage 3 head /liquid intercooler
      186.1hp/199.7tq 17psi
      Avg = 192.9

      4. lilg60rkt
      8v Stage 4+, G60 58mm
      186.3hp/196.5tq
      Avg = 191.4

      5.G60Dano
      1.9L 8V 9:1 CR stg 3 head KK STGII
      65mm 18psi Rallie outlet#36 inj.2.5exh
      179.9WHP 200WTQ
      AVG=189.9

      6.justg60stock
      1.8l 8v hyd p&p bbm stage 4 65mm G60
      187hp/188tq
      Avg = 187.5

      7. MaineCorrado
      ???
      182.7hp/182.0tq
      Avg = 182.35

      8.fastg60
      1.9l fmic 3.5 fpr 5 chip#30inj header
      p&p 17 psi
      177.9hp 187.5tq
      AVG=182

      9. Lance-G60
      ???
      179.0hp/185.0tq
      Avg = 182


      10. URIN 2ND
      8v Stage 4+ G60
      172.1hp/186.2tq
      Avg = 179.15

      11. G60ING
      ???
      172.0hp/186.2tq
      Avg = 179.1

      12. BLUE NRG
      ???
      176.6hp/180.1tq
      Avg = 178.35

      13. G60Jason
      ???
      172.0hp/184.0tq
      Avg = 178.0

      14. jwatts
      ???
      167.8hp/185.9tq
      Avg = 176.85

      15. 1993jetta GL (G60)
      8v Stage 4+, TT D/P, 2.5 Exh.
      172.5/172.8
      Avg = 172.65

      16. VW1990CORRADO
      1.8l 8v Stage 4+
      172.3hp/170.8tq
      Avg = 171.55

      17. mpaster
      ???
      164.6hp/174.7tq
      Avg = 169.65

      18.MKRAD
      1.8l stage 4 16psi
      162WHP 172WTQ
      add 40shot 202WHP 306WTQ
      AVG=167

      19.90GT-G60
      ???
      170.5hp/160.4tq
      Avg = 165.45

      20.CVOVP
      ???
      159.1hp/166.9tq
      Avg = 163

      16v G60

      1. DougG60 HIGHEST HP 16V
      2L 16VG60, 50lb inj, SDS 68mm
      12psi 8.7:1 CR, 3.6 bar FPR
      stock cams, stock IC
      244hwp204wtq
      Avg = 224

      2.DougG60 (Nitrous)
      Stage 4+, 50-shot
      215.0hp/232.0tq
      Avg = 223.5

      TURBO 8v

      1. mrkrad HIGHEST Tubro HP 8V HYD HEAD
      1.8l 8v T3 Super 60 @ 20 psi
      214.0hp/239.0tq
      Avg = 226.5

      2.TdiVentoDave
      1.8l 8v super 60 giant ft/mt intercooler
      194hp / 220tq
      AVG = 207

      3.Ronan
      1.8l 8v P&P head &TB 30lb 260 cam T3-60 w/.48
      3.5 fpr 14psi
      176WHP 213WTQ
      AVG= 194.5

      TURBO 16V

      1.Repoman
      2.0L 16VT 8.5:1 comp gt3076 .63ar 26psi 268
      82# injectors 034efi
      407whp/346wtq
      Avg = 376.5

      2.JWATTS
      ABA 16V T3-4e 57 w/ 9:1 compression
      AT cams w/ 1.8L head.@ ~13psi
      250whp & 230wtq
      Avg=240.0

      LYSHOLM 8v

      1.Boomdaddymack HIGHEST HP 8V SOLID LIFTERHEAD
      Lysholm 20 psi, Air/Water, 8v Solid lifter head
      226.4hp/225.5tq
      Avg = 225.95

      2. REPOMAN
      2.0L 8v P&P w/a I/C stage 5 Lysholm 22psi #30 Malpassi FPR
      207whp/250wtq
      Avg = 228.5

      3.SUV-ETR HIGHEST HP 8V HYD LIFTER HEAD
      1.9L PG Stg 4head 276/272 cam
      42# injectors SNS Chip Lysholm 57mm y
      PWR air/water intercooler
      235hp 205wtq
      AVG=220

      4.Peter Tong
      2.0l ABA Eurospec head FMIC
      G grind cam 240t CIS 15psi Lysholm
      190whp 200wtq
      AVG=195

      5.Crez
      lysholm 15psi 260/268 cam #30 inj pnp head/intake
      tb, tt 2 1/4 exhaust
      190hp 188tq
      AVG=189

      6.g60SWEEDE
      1.8l 8v Lysholm
      181.1hp/191.8tq
      Avg = 186.45

      7.Padfan1
      1.8l 8v lysholm fmic 12psi
      171hp 181tq
      AVG=176

      8.LysholmG60
      1.8l 8v Lysholm
      164.3hp/181.3tq
      Avg = 172.8

      9.smoked_g60
      1.9l 8v Lysholm, non-intercooled, 9:1 CR
      175hp/163tq
      Avg = 169

      10.Weaver
      1.8l 8v Lysholm
      151.7hp/160.7tq
      Avg = 156.2

      16v LYSHOLM
      1. Repoman
      2.0l 16v Lysholm 22psi 8.5:1 comp w/W/A IC 034efi
      262whp 242wtq
      AVG=252
      2.JBETZ
      1.8l 16v Lysholm 17psi 7.5-1 comp w/a i/c Tec III
      254.4HP 219.8TQ
      AVG=237.1

      3. Staggerlee
      1.9l 16v PnP, Stock Cams
      42# Inj FMIC 13 psi SNS
      211whp 199wtq
      AVG=205

      20v Lysholm
      1.JBetz
      1.8 Lysholm AEB
      411whp


      Last edited by REPOMAN; 06-20-2011 at 11:01 PM.
      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GKS...80UVORSMiYMNQg

    23. Member G60ING's Avatar
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      11-13-2003 08:15 AM #25

    24. Member
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      11-24-2003 12:42 AM #26
      Another good timing belt change thread.

      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1122768


    25. 12-15-2003 01:10 PM #27
      Heres a link to the PDF file of the G60 engine management manual, very helpful. right click and save:http://www.corrado-club.ca/ferg/gladder.pdf

      courtesy of the corrado club...... thanks guys


      Modified by 2manyprojects at 6:12 PM 2-7-2004


    26. Member Strictly Gravy's Avatar
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      02-06-2004 02:37 PM #28
      How to do a Coolant flush on a G60 101 by Strictly Gravy:

      tools: Household slimline fan, Safety glasses, Cardboard, Drain Bucket, Channel lock pliers or Clamp compression tool from hardware store, Slotted Screw Driver, Hose/water supply(you need a fair amount) Coolant of your choice, Water Wetter(if desired) Jackstands, 12 pack of Bud Light Bottles(optional), Pack of Camel Lights(optional)

      Note, this can also be used for a G11-G12 swap, just make sure you repeat steps 11-15 until water coming out is CRYSTAL CLEAR

      1. Make sure car is cool, and has not been run in a while. Coolant is kind of hot.

      2.where ever you chose to work, make sure you before you start, place cardboard on the floor below the entire engine bay, bc coolant may go everywhere or just drip, and it gets kind of slippery.

      3. Set car on Jackstands

      4. Pop Hood, Open Coolant reservoir Tank

      5. Now, get below engine, wearing safety glasses on with channel lock pliers and your large bucket(whatever you choose as a catch can).

      6. Directly below drivers side of radiator. Locate lower radiator hose. Its a soft rubber hose going over a hard metal pipe. It is right above/next to the Power steering hose which rests on the back lip of the Front Crossmember. Place The large bucket, etc directly below.

      7. Now, with your pliers, remove the clamp holding the hose over the metal pipe. Slowly work its way off. I sometimes use a flat head screwdriver to help coax the hose off(if you havent done this for a while, prepare for some rust on there, and it may be difficult)

      8. Now, Be prepared for coolant to start dripping once the hose has begun to be removed. At first, yeah, its gonna suck. you get the sticky coolant on ya, but keep on working. once you get the hose all the way off, it will start to flow. Try and get as much as you can in the bucket, bc A) its VERY slippery and kind of a pain in the ass to get the residue off the floor(but if you have cardboard, your fine ) B If you have pets, the mixture(ethelyn-glycol i belive) is very harmful/DEADLY. dogs love it bc its sweet, but its not so sweet after about an hour in their system

      9. Now, with the lower coolant hose, still unattached, grab the hose, and insert it into your coolant reservoir. let it run for a while. Good time for a smoke/beer whatever floats your boat. However, be careful to not let your bucket overflow, thats no fun.

      10. Turn off hose, but leave it nearby.

      11. Reconnect lower rad hose. Clamp it if you want, but really no need, its gonna come off in 20 mins again anyway.

      12. Fill coolant reservoir up with plain old water from your water source.

      13. Put cap back on Coolant reservoir

      14. Start car, let it run for a full cycle(ie until the fan turns on and should turn off again.) Once again, another good time for a beer/smoke

      15. This is where the slimline house fan comes into play. Now, with car off, place fan either on top of the motor blowing down, or below the car(on 2x4s) blowing up(imho, works faster). This helps the cool down time of the coolant/engine immensely. Let that run for about 10-15 minutes. (do not rush this part. 200+ degree burns from coolant are not fun, i know) Once again, time for a beer/smoke

      15. Drain coolant from lower radiator hose. Some may still be coolanty bc there is some left in the block etc you did not flush out on your previous flush.

      16. Repeat steps 11-15 until your happy with the cleanliness of the water coming out of the system(or if you are just too drunk and have to stop )

      17. After you are satisfied with your results, Fill tank up with whatever brand coolant and mixture you want. I ran i think a 60/40 water/coolent in the corrado, i dont know, its been so damn long . Right now though, in the Audi, in Chicago's sub zero-temps, im running about a 50/50 mix. Also, it doesnt hurt to throw in about half a bottle of water wetter(removes any small air pockets stuck to radiator.)

      18. Now, leave cap off of reservoir. This is where you "burp" the system. Turn car on and let warm up. The coolant reservoir may go down. this is the air bubbles escaping from the system. Refill as needed. Let the car cycle back through again with the fan etc. Once again, drink/smoke at your leisure

      19. Replace reservoir cap, lower car off jackstands, take her for a spin. after your drive, pop the hood and check the level of coolant, it may have gotten lower. Repeatedly check your coolant level for the next week or so. if you have high coolant temps, continue to 'burp' the system. if that doesnt work, flush your system again.

      20. Have one last beer and smoke to commemorate a job well done
      '
      I hope this helps some people who were questioning it etc. I also dont kno if there has been an extensive writeup on this, so, i figured, im unemployed, my HW is done, and im too lazy to go out in the garage and work on my piece just yet.

      -Greg




      Modified by Strictly Gravy at 2:09 PM 2-6-2004


    27. Member white rabbit's Avatar
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      02-18-2004 04:08 PM #29
      Charger bypass belt for non-ac using the ABA smooth water pump pulley

      I originally set up my engine for non-ac using the ABA water pump pulley 028 121 031 E. Now the charger is dead, so I needed to bypass the charger as well. I ended up using a 48.5 inch 6 rib belt from pep boys DAYCO part number 485K6. I tried a few different sizes bigger and smaller, the 48.5" seemed like the best fit.


    28. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
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      04-08-2004 06:35 PM #30
      Famous quotes on engine building

      Always maximize power within
      the rpm band where the engine
      spends most it's time.

      Port velocity will improve
      cylinder filling more efficiently
      especially at and below peak torque
      than big flow numbers generated
      by large slow moving ports.

      A strong cylinder head will always
      make more power even if poorly
      matched with the cam. A weak
      cylinder head matched with an
      optimized cam will never perform as well.

      Intake runner length is one of the critical
      decisions in engine building since it
      contributes significantly to the shape of
      the power curve.

      John Lingenfelter


      I've been building racing engines
      most of my life and i've never seen
      a broken engine win a race.

      Durability is as important as speed
      and any modification that jeopardizes
      reliability in exchange for power is foolish.

      In the final analysis the question of
      Bore vs Stroke is actually one of
      torque vs horsepower. the ideal
      racing engine would produce a lot of
      torque in the mid range crank speeds
      and a lot of horsepower at high crank speeds.

      Torque in the mid range is needed to accelerate
      the chassie from a stop on the other hand horse
      power is needed to sustain the maximum speed
      on a long straightaway

      In general when the connecting rod is made longer
      [with in practical limits] an engine will produce more
      torque and more horsepower.
      Smokey Yunick

      With a longer rod at high crank speeds the piston
      stays at tdc longer than a shorter rod creating
      better combustion .
      Repoman

      A three-angle valve job simply has a relief angle on the other side of the seat angle itself. The seat angle is nearly always at 45 degrees to the axis of the valve stem. The inner relief angle is generally at 30 degrees to the same axis, and the outer angle is normally at 60 degrees. The inner and outer relief angles are sometimes referred to by their total (included) angle. By that method the same relief angles would be called 60 and 120, respectively. A three- angle valve seat is relatively easy to cut or grind and requires a minimum of time and number of cutters or stones.

      A five - angle valve job takes more expertise, time, and tools than the normal three-angle and therefore costs more. Such work is on the flat part of the what-you-pay verses what-you-get curve. A five-angle valveseat adds another set of cuts between the inner relief cut and the port and the outer relief cut and the combustion chamber. Their purpose is to help smooth the airflow through the seat area at the low valve lifts.

      Full Radius
      Farther along the same curve is the valve-seat work that usually only accompanies expert porting. A ported head has a smooth curving transition from the port to the actual seat, and also may curve on the combustion chamber part of the seat. The difference in air flow performance between a five angle valve job and a full radius is about as much as the difference between a three angle and a five angle.

      Most naturally aspirated engines require between 30 and 38 degress of ignition advance to achieve PCP at the correct crank pin position to make maximum power. By compressing the mixture through turbocharging/supercharging, the rate of flame front progression increases and slightly less ignition advance is required to achieve PCP at the correct moment. In most cases, less than 5 degrees of retard is required however. We see many people throwing in 15 to 25 degrees of retard in a vain attempt to stop detonation at very high boost pressures for the fuel and compression ratios that they are running. It should be stressed that there are no free rides here. If you plan to achieve high specific outputs on low octane pump fuels for extended periods, you WILL have to reduce the CR. Truly high specific outputs are only available when using high octane fuels or by injecting anti-detonants. There are sound scientific reasons why there are no factory 10 to 1 CR turbocharged engines which produce specific outputs of 175 hp/L. In fact, there is NO production, piston, automotive engine which I am aware of which can achieve a specific output of this level on 92 octane pump fuel anywhere. Despite this fact, many people try to do this with expensive results. High compression ratios and high boost simply don't mix on pump fuel. If you try this, you will either be unhappy with the results or blow up the engine. When I say production engine, I mean one that you can buy off the showroom floor, no modifications, with the factory warranty intact. HP to be tested on a proper engine dyno, not on a chassis dyno with phantom flywheel correction factors applied. If Toyota, Honda or Ford could do this with factory reliability, don't you think that they would? As discussed in some of the reference articles above, set reasonable hp goals and modify the internal components as required to obtain these levels reliably. Be aware that many Japanese spec engines are designed to run on 98-102 octane fuel in their home markets. These engines will not be able to run the same boost levels on North American 92 octane fuel. Expect lots of detonation or spark retard if you attempt this.
      Making it Live

      Reducing the compression ratio or using higher octane fuel are the two best ways to increase power on a turbocharged/supercharged engine. If you drive on the street, you pretty well have to use pump fuel. In this case, you may want to fit some lower compression pistons. Pistons and spark plugs are often the first parts in the engine to suffer from the effects of overpressure and over temperature conditions. A high output engine should always be fitted with colder spark plugs- a point often overlooked by amateur engine builders. Forged pistons and turbo motors go together like jam and toast but there are wide variations between forged pistons. On a turbocharged application, temperatures and pressures will far exceed anything seen on a naturally aspirated engine. Because the specific output is higher, the rate of energy release is higher. Piston dome temperatures can run between 450 and 550 degrees F. Most aluminum alloys have lost over half of their strength at 400F. Turbo pistons need to have thick upper sections to be able to dissipate heat faster to the skirts and cylinder walls to keep dome temperatures down to safe limits. High silicon pistons can be fitted tighter because of their lower expansion rates for less rattling when cold but because they are more brittle, they don't stand as much detonation as a low silicon piston. Compression ratios for street use should generally be kept in the 7.0 to 8.5 to 1 range.
      High silicon forged piston for use on naturally aspirated and low output turbocharge/supercharged. they have relatively thin dome and corner radis.

      Most factory turbocharged/supercharged engines are equipped with under- piston oil jets. These are an especially good idea on engines with large bores where the center of the piston dome is a long way away from the sides to be able to dissipate heat efficiently and extra thickness can add excessive weight to the reciprocating assembly.

      we get phone calls and E-mails every day from people wanting to make absurd hp figures on pump fuel on engines and drivetrains which are essentially stock. We're not trying to discourage you from your dreams, just trying to add a dose of reality. Assuming you get everthing right and a 2L engine makes 400hp (unlikely), what drivetrain will transmit this power reliably to the ground, especially in a drag racing environment? The drag strips are littered with cars suffering from obliterated drivetrain parts being loaded onto flat beds at the end of race day. What is the point of this hp if something blows up every 5th pass? Build everything right to take your intended power. If you think your factory drivetrain will handle double or triple or quadruple the stock torque, you are in for an expensive surprise.

      We talk to thousands of people every year with regards to EFI systems and modified engines. We get many people who just have to build a high compression turbocharged/supercharged street engine. Even though we strongly suggest lowering the compression ratio, many people insist on 9 to 10 to 1 CRs. Usually these people phone back with sob stories of lots of pinging, blown head gaskets, melted plugs and pistons. We dispense free information based on 25 years of performance engine building experience to help people save money and disappointment. We frankly see very few high compression turbo engines running on pump fuel lasting more than a month before they fail. This is why you don't see any high power factory turbo cars with 10 to 1 CRs. Stick to under 8.5 Crs and you will make more power and have higher reliability.
      RaceTech


      When designing or building a turbo/supercharged engine you must not think of air being blown into the engine. you must think in terms of the compressor supplying higher density air. Flow is Flow and whether it is water, thin air or dense air, with different Reynolds Numbers, the rules are all the same. All of the things that interrupt flow are just as prevalent in a turbo/supercharged engine as in a normally aspirated engine. The Port shape and combustion chamber are no different than it would be if the engine was normally aspirated. the transition in the bowl area from the port entrance. The shape of the port is probably the most critical factor in how much power a given engine can produce and more importantly where in the rpm band does the power start and peters out. Remember , the higher intake manifold pressure developed by a turbo leads to higher velocity flow into the combustion chamber. In my own experience I have found that getting the ports to flow at low valve lift seems to go hand in hand with a broad torque band and that translates into better drivability. Of course there are other factors that influence the width of the torque band of an engine but they are all tied to the breathing. The intake manifold for instance is very key as it is upstream from the ports of the cylinder head. Turbo/supercharging, because of the huge benefit of the denser air can sometimes allow engines to get away with a lot. most manifold have literally sharp 90 degree corners in it but the engine makes (for most people) ample power. The bottom line is that every time the air has to change direction you need to gently convince it to do so, such that the amount of energy it looses through pumping losses is minimized. If you look at custome made intake manifolds you can see the smooth trumpet shapes that are used to get the air to enter the runners with the least amount of turbulence developed. the straight smooth runners to minimize the pumping losses. These are very typical characteristics of what you would see on any sophisticated normally aspirated engine. The difference in the normally aspirated engine might be in the runner length as it would be tuned for optimum performance at a different Rpm range.
      As in the design of the Intake system the same things that are important to the normally aspirated engine are also important to the turbo. The headers don't have to be equal length but it helps if each of the pressure pulses going into the turbo impellers are equal. But here there is a difference from the normally aspirated engine which responds to a tuned length. The tuned length and proper collector actually help the flow of the normal engine by creating a negative pressure in the collector to help the next pulse flow out. The turbo has this hot housing and impeller stuck in the way so the equal pulses help but the pressure build prior to the Turbo negates any benefit derived from the a tuned length and collector.





      Modified by REPOMAN at 6:03 PM 4-26-2004

      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GKS...80UVORSMiYMNQg

    29. Member COP TZR's Avatar
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      '03 JETTA WAGON TURBOOOoooooo
      04-25-2004 12:28 AM #31
      so do we have a final answer for the belts and pulley? What belts to use with a 65mm pulley and no A/C?

    30. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
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      05-19-2004 12:15 AM #32
      setting the timing

      Service Adjustment Mode

      Before attempting to set the ignition timing or base idle speed the ECU must be put into service adjustment mode. This is done by making sure the engine is thoroughly warm and then disconnecting the multi-plug from the blue coolant temperature sensor while the engine is running.

      If the engine stalls at any point while making adjustments to the timing and base idle speed the multi-plug must be refitted to the coolant temperature sensor before re-starting the engine. Failure to do this will cause the ECU to enter ‘limp home’ mode. Adjustments will then not be possible until you have cleared the faults from the ECU memory.

      Ignition Timing

      The procedure in the Haynes manual will give a rough timing setting. To set the timing properly the following procedure is needed. Digifant has an unusual procedure for setting the timing so please follow the instructions carefully.

      With the ECU in service adjustment mode blip the throttle so that the engine revs past 2500 rpm. Do this four times.

      Increase the engine speed from idle to between 2000 and 2500 rpm and check the timing. This should be 6° +/-1°. If adjustment is needed slacken the distributor fixing bolts and turn the distributor until you have the correct timing.

      Allow the engine to return to idle speed and re-connect the multi-plug to the blue coolant temperature sensor. Blip the throttle three times, making sure the engine speed rises over 3000 rpm each time.

      Check the ignition timing now advances with increased revs by slowly increasing the engine speed while watching the timing marks. Without an expensive timing light you will not be able to accurately measure the advance, but it should be around 40° at 2800 rpm.

      Idle Speed

      Before attempting to adjust the idle speed make sure the ignition timing is correct. It is also worth taking the idle speed control valve off the engine and thoroughly spraying it with carburettor cleaner. If the engine has done any significant mileage you will be amazed at the amount of black goo that comes out of the valve.

      The regulated engine speed is controlled by the ECU and is not adjustable. The ECU regulates idle speed by opening and closing the idle speed control valve and also by making continuous small adjustments to the ignition timing. However for this to work properly the base idle speed must be set correctly.

      To set the base idle speed remove the breather hose from the pressure regulating valve on the cam cover and plug the hose. Start the engine and allow it to idle for a couple of minutes and then put the ECU into service adjustment mode by detaching the multi-plug from the blue coolant temperature sensor.

      Blip the throttle three times, making sure the engine speed rises over 3000 rpm each time. Allow the engine to return to idle and then use the idle adjustment screw to set the idle speed to 920 rpm +/- 25 rpm.

      Re-connect the coolant temperature sensor, unplug and re-connect the breather hose. The engine speed should now settle down to the correct regulated figure of 900 to 950 rpm.

      CO Adjustment

      Without an exhaust gas analyser there is no way you can measure the CO content. However don’t despair because the CO adjustment screw only affects the CO content at idle and the lambda sensor will adjust the idle mixture to the correct value – provided it is working OK.



      Modified by REPOMAN at 9:27 PM 5-18-2004

      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GKS...80UVORSMiYMNQg

    31. 06-04-2004 04:58 PM #33
      Want to swap a G60 into a non-Ce2 car? jump over to this faq on the 16V forum.
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1305329

    32. Member dubstarks's Avatar
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      06-17-2004 12:35 PM #34
      I'm doing a G60 to MK1 swap I will be doing a detailed day by day proses with pics I'm planning to start the project the middle of July and plan to have it done by the end August if you are interested let me know

    33. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
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      06-17-2004 11:30 PM #35
      engine building tips

      When designing or building a turbo engine you must not think of air being blown into the engine. you must think in terms of the compressor supplying higher density air. Flow is Flow and whether it is water, thin air or dense air, with different Reynolds Numbers, the rules are all the same. All of the things that interrupt flow are just as prevalent in a turbo engine as in a normally aspirated engine. The Port shape and combustion chamber are no different than it would be if the engine was normally aspirated. the transition in the bowl area from the port entrance. The shape of the port is probably the most critical factor in how much power a given engine can produce and more importantly where in the rpm band does the power start and peters out. Remember , the higher intake manifold pressure developed by a turbo leads to higher velocity flow into the combustion chamber. In my own experience I have found that getting the ports to flow at low valve lift seems to go hand in hand with a broad torque band and that translates into better drivability. Of course there are other factors that influence the width of the torque band of an engine but they are all tied to the breathing. The intake manifold for instance is very key as it is upstream from the ports of the cylinder head. Turbo charging, because of the huge benefit of the denser air can sometimes allow engines to get away with a lot. most manifold have literally sharp 90 degree corners in it but the engine makes (for most people) ample power. The bottom line is that every time the air has to change direction you need to gently convince it to do so, such that the amount of energy it looses through pumping losses is minimized. If you look at custome made intake manifolds you can see the smooth trumpet shapes that are used to get the air to enter the runners with the least amount of turbulence developed. the straight smooth runners to minimize the pumping losses. These are very typical characteristics of what you would see on any sophisticated normally aspirated engine. The difference in the normally aspirated engine might be in the runner length as it would be tuned for optimum performance at a different Rpm range.
      As in the design of the Intake system the same things that are important to the normally aspirated engine are also important to the turbo. The headers don't have to be equal length but it helps if each of the pressure pulses going into the turbo impellers are equal. But here there is a difference from the normally aspirated engine which responds to a tuned length. The tuned length and proper collector actually help the flow of the normal engine by creating a negative pressure in the collector to help the next pulse flow out. The turbo has this hot housing and impeller stuck in the way so the equal pulses help but the pressure build prior to the Turbo negates any benefit derived from the a tuned length and collector.
      so to put it simply you can gain a great amout of power by
      head work . in any FI application the runner velocity is imortent by over porting the intake side you loose velocity
      and increasing the exhaust side you increase the volume
      there are many ways to do this ... bigger valves radious cutting the valve seats porting .... all will increase the power output.

      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GKS...80UVORSMiYMNQg

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