Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    VWVortex


    Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
    Results 26 to 50 of 67

    Thread: g60 FAQ - Read this first!

    1. Member
      Join Date
      Aug 4th, 2000
      Location
      Mesquite, TX
      Posts
      5,344
      Vehicles
      90 Lysolm Corrado 75 STD Beetle 01 Dodge Ram 2500
      11-24-2003 12:42 AM #26
      Another good timing belt change thread.
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1122768

    2. 12-15-2003 01:10 PM #27
      Heres a link to the PDF file of the G60 engine management manual, very helpful. right click and save:http://www.corrado-club.ca/ferg/gladder.pdf

      courtesy of the corrado club...... thanks guys


      Modified by 2manyprojects at 6:12 PM 2-7-2004

    3. Member Strictly Gravy's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 15th, 2003
      Location
      NE GA
      Posts
      8,227
      Vehicles
      TT 5.9 Cummins, G8 GT, 72 Powerwagon, 39 International
      02-06-2004 02:37 PM #28
      How to do a Coolant flush on a G60 101 by Strictly Gravy:
      tools: Household slimline fan, Safety glasses, Cardboard, Drain Bucket, Channel lock pliers or Clamp compression tool from hardware store, Slotted Screw Driver, Hose/water supply(you need a fair amount) Coolant of your choice, Water Wetter(if desired) Jackstands, 12 pack of Bud Light Bottles(optional), Pack of Camel Lights(optional)
      Note, this can also be used for a G11-G12 swap, just make sure you repeat steps 11-15 until water coming out is CRYSTAL CLEAR
      1. Make sure car is cool, and has not been run in a while. Coolant is kind of hot.
      2.where ever you chose to work, make sure you before you start, place cardboard on the floor below the entire engine bay, bc coolant may go everywhere or just drip, and it gets kind of slippery.
      3. Set car on Jackstands
      4. Pop Hood, Open Coolant reservoir Tank
      5. Now, get below engine, wearing safety glasses on with channel lock pliers and your large bucket(whatever you choose as a catch can).
      6. Directly below drivers side of radiator. Locate lower radiator hose. Its a soft rubber hose going over a hard metal pipe. It is right above/next to the Power steering hose which rests on the back lip of the Front Crossmember. Place The large bucket, etc directly below.
      7. Now, with your pliers, remove the clamp holding the hose over the metal pipe. Slowly work its way off. I sometimes use a flat head screwdriver to help coax the hose off(if you havent done this for a while, prepare for some rust on there, and it may be difficult)
      8. Now, Be prepared for coolant to start dripping once the hose has begun to be removed. At first, yeah, its gonna suck. you get the sticky coolant on ya, but keep on working. once you get the hose all the way off, it will start to flow. Try and get as much as you can in the bucket, bc A) its VERY slippery and kind of a pain in the ass to get the residue off the floor(but if you have cardboard, your fine ) B If you have pets, the mixture(ethelyn-glycol i belive) is very harmful/DEADLY. dogs love it bc its sweet, but its not so sweet after about an hour in their system
      9. Now, with the lower coolant hose, still unattached, grab the hose, and insert it into your coolant reservoir. let it run for a while. Good time for a smoke/beer whatever floats your boat. However, be careful to not let your bucket overflow, thats no fun.
      10. Turn off hose, but leave it nearby.
      11. Reconnect lower rad hose. Clamp it if you want, but really no need, its gonna come off in 20 mins again anyway.
      12. Fill coolant reservoir up with plain old water from your water source.
      13. Put cap back on Coolant reservoir
      14. Start car, let it run for a full cycle(ie until the fan turns on and should turn off again.) Once again, another good time for a beer/smoke
      15. This is where the slimline house fan comes into play. Now, with car off, place fan either on top of the motor blowing down, or below the car(on 2x4s) blowing up(imho, works faster). This helps the cool down time of the coolant/engine immensely. Let that run for about 10-15 minutes. (do not rush this part. 200+ degree burns from coolant are not fun, i know) Once again, time for a beer/smoke
      15. Drain coolant from lower radiator hose. Some may still be coolanty bc there is some left in the block etc you did not flush out on your previous flush.
      16. Repeat steps 11-15 until your happy with the cleanliness of the water coming out of the system(or if you are just too drunk and have to stop )
      17. After you are satisfied with your results, Fill tank up with whatever brand coolant and mixture you want. I ran i think a 60/40 water/coolent in the corrado, i dont know, its been so damn long . Right now though, in the Audi, in Chicago's sub zero-temps, im running about a 50/50 mix. Also, it doesnt hurt to throw in about half a bottle of water wetter(removes any small air pockets stuck to radiator.)
      18. Now, leave cap off of reservoir. This is where you "burp" the system. Turn car on and let warm up. The coolant reservoir may go down. this is the air bubbles escaping from the system. Refill as needed. Let the car cycle back through again with the fan etc. Once again, drink/smoke at your leisure
      19. Replace reservoir cap, lower car off jackstands, take her for a spin. after your drive, pop the hood and check the level of coolant, it may have gotten lower. Repeatedly check your coolant level for the next week or so. if you have high coolant temps, continue to 'burp' the system. if that doesnt work, flush your system again.
      20. Have one last beer and smoke to commemorate a job well done
      '
      I hope this helps some people who were questioning it etc. I also dont kno if there has been an extensive writeup on this, so, i figured, im unemployed, my HW is done, and im too lazy to go out in the garage and work on my piece just yet.
      -Greg



      Modified by Strictly Gravy at 2:09 PM 2-6-2004
      08 Dodge Ram 2500 Megacab - S467.7 Turbo, 40% injectors, EFI Live....521 WHP / 1011 WTQ
      09 G8 GT - Stock mountain runner
      2014 Dodge Ram 2500 - The Pipeline Pig

    4. Member white rabbit's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 23rd, 2001
      Location
      Baltimore
      Posts
      3,234
      02-18-2004 04:08 PM #29
      Charger bypass belt for non-ac using the ABA smooth water pump pulley
      I originally set up my engine for non-ac using the ABA water pump pulley 028 121 031 E. Now the charger is dead, so I needed to bypass the charger as well. I ended up using a 48.5 inch 6 rib belt from pep boys DAYCO part number 485K6. I tried a few different sizes bigger and smaller, the 48.5" seemed like the best fit.

    5. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2001
      Location
      Portland OR
      Posts
      5,994
      Vehicles
      1990 VW Corrado
      04-08-2004 06:35 PM #30
      Famous quotes on engine building
      Always maximize power within
      the rpm band where the engine
      spends most it's time.
      Port velocity will improve
      cylinder filling more efficiently
      especially at and below peak torque
      than big flow numbers generated
      by large slow moving ports.
      A strong cylinder head will always
      make more power even if poorly
      matched with the cam. A weak
      cylinder head matched with an
      optimized cam will never perform as well.
      Intake runner length is one of the critical
      decisions in engine building since it
      contributes significantly to the shape of
      the power curve.
      John Lingenfelter

      I've been building racing engines
      most of my life and i've never seen
      a broken engine win a race.
      Durability is as important as speed
      and any modification that jeopardizes
      reliability in exchange for power is foolish.
      In the final analysis the question of
      Bore vs Stroke is actually one of
      torque vs horsepower. the ideal
      racing engine would produce a lot of
      torque in the mid range crank speeds
      and a lot of horsepower at high crank speeds.
      Torque in the mid range is needed to accelerate
      the chassie from a stop on the other hand horse
      power is needed to sustain the maximum speed
      on a long straightaway
      In general when the connecting rod is made longer
      [with in practical limits] an engine will produce more
      torque and more horsepower.
      Smokey Yunick
      With a longer rod at high crank speeds the piston
      stays at tdc longer than a shorter rod creating
      better combustion .
      Repoman
      A three-angle valve job simply has a relief angle on the other side of the seat angle itself. The seat angle is nearly always at 45 degrees to the axis of the valve stem. The inner relief angle is generally at 30 degrees to the same axis, and the outer angle is normally at 60 degrees. The inner and outer relief angles are sometimes referred to by their total (included) angle. By that method the same relief angles would be called 60 and 120, respectively. A three- angle valve seat is relatively easy to cut or grind and requires a minimum of time and number of cutters or stones.
      A five - angle valve job takes more expertise, time, and tools than the normal three-angle and therefore costs more. Such work is on the flat part of the what-you-pay verses what-you-get curve. A five-angle valveseat adds another set of cuts between the inner relief cut and the port and the outer relief cut and the combustion chamber. Their purpose is to help smooth the airflow through the seat area at the low valve lifts.
      Full Radius
      Farther along the same curve is the valve-seat work that usually only accompanies expert porting. A ported head has a smooth curving transition from the port to the actual seat, and also may curve on the combustion chamber part of the seat. The difference in air flow performance between a five angle valve job and a full radius is about as much as the difference between a three angle and a five angle.
      Most naturally aspirated engines require between 30 and 38 degress of ignition advance to achieve PCP at the correct crank pin position to make maximum power. By compressing the mixture through turbocharging/supercharging, the rate of flame front progression increases and slightly less ignition advance is required to achieve PCP at the correct moment. In most cases, less than 5 degrees of retard is required however. We see many people throwing in 15 to 25 degrees of retard in a vain attempt to stop detonation at very high boost pressures for the fuel and compression ratios that they are running. It should be stressed that there are no free rides here. If you plan to achieve high specific outputs on low octane pump fuels for extended periods, you WILL have to reduce the CR. Truly high specific outputs are only available when using high octane fuels or by injecting anti-detonants. There are sound scientific reasons why there are no factory 10 to 1 CR turbocharged engines which produce specific outputs of 175 hp/L. In fact, there is NO production, piston, automotive engine which I am aware of which can achieve a specific output of this level on 92 octane pump fuel anywhere. Despite this fact, many people try to do this with expensive results. High compression ratios and high boost simply don't mix on pump fuel. If you try this, you will either be unhappy with the results or blow up the engine. When I say production engine, I mean one that you can buy off the showroom floor, no modifications, with the factory warranty intact. HP to be tested on a proper engine dyno, not on a chassis dyno with phantom flywheel correction factors applied. If Toyota, Honda or Ford could do this with factory reliability, don't you think that they would? As discussed in some of the reference articles above, set reasonable hp goals and modify the internal components as required to obtain these levels reliably. Be aware that many Japanese spec engines are designed to run on 98-102 octane fuel in their home markets. These engines will not be able to run the same boost levels on North American 92 octane fuel. Expect lots of detonation or spark retard if you attempt this.
      Making it Live
      Reducing the compression ratio or using higher octane fuel are the two best ways to increase power on a turbocharged/supercharged engine. If you drive on the street, you pretty well have to use pump fuel. In this case, you may want to fit some lower compression pistons. Pistons and spark plugs are often the first parts in the engine to suffer from the effects of overpressure and over temperature conditions. A high output engine should always be fitted with colder spark plugs- a point often overlooked by amateur engine builders. Forged pistons and turbo motors go together like jam and toast but there are wide variations between forged pistons. On a turbocharged application, temperatures and pressures will far exceed anything seen on a naturally aspirated engine. Because the specific output is higher, the rate of energy release is higher. Piston dome temperatures can run between 450 and 550 degrees F. Most aluminum alloys have lost over half of their strength at 400F. Turbo pistons need to have thick upper sections to be able to dissipate heat faster to the skirts and cylinder walls to keep dome temperatures down to safe limits. High silicon pistons can be fitted tighter because of their lower expansion rates for less rattling when cold but because they are more brittle, they don't stand as much detonation as a low silicon piston. Compression ratios for street use should generally be kept in the 7.0 to 8.5 to 1 range.
      High silicon forged piston for use on naturally aspirated and low output turbocharge/supercharged. they have relatively thin dome and corner radis.
      Most factory turbocharged/supercharged engines are equipped with under- piston oil jets. These are an especially good idea on engines with large bores where the center of the piston dome is a long way away from the sides to be able to dissipate heat efficiently and extra thickness can add excessive weight to the reciprocating assembly.
      we get phone calls and E-mails every day from people wanting to make absurd hp figures on pump fuel on engines and drivetrains which are essentially stock. We're not trying to discourage you from your dreams, just trying to add a dose of reality. Assuming you get everthing right and a 2L engine makes 400hp (unlikely), what drivetrain will transmit this power reliably to the ground, especially in a drag racing environment? The drag strips are littered with cars suffering from obliterated drivetrain parts being loaded onto flat beds at the end of race day. What is the point of this hp if something blows up every 5th pass? Build everything right to take your intended power. If you think your factory drivetrain will handle double or triple or quadruple the stock torque, you are in for an expensive surprise.
      We talk to thousands of people every year with regards to EFI systems and modified engines. We get many people who just have to build a high compression turbocharged/supercharged street engine. Even though we strongly suggest lowering the compression ratio, many people insist on 9 to 10 to 1 CRs. Usually these people phone back with sob stories of lots of pinging, blown head gaskets, melted plugs and pistons. We dispense free information based on 25 years of performance engine building experience to help people save money and disappointment. We frankly see very few high compression turbo engines running on pump fuel lasting more than a month before they fail. This is why you don't see any high power factory turbo cars with 10 to 1 CRs. Stick to under 8.5 Crs and you will make more power and have higher reliability.
      RaceTech

      When designing or building a turbo/supercharged engine you must not think of air being blown into the engine. you must think in terms of the compressor supplying higher density air. Flow is Flow and whether it is water, thin air or dense air, with different Reynolds Numbers, the rules are all the same. All of the things that interrupt flow are just as prevalent in a turbo/supercharged engine as in a normally aspirated engine. The Port shape and combustion chamber are no different than it would be if the engine was normally aspirated. the transition in the bowl area from the port entrance. The shape of the port is probably the most critical factor in how much power a given engine can produce and more importantly where in the rpm band does the power start and peters out. Remember , the higher intake manifold pressure developed by a turbo leads to higher velocity flow into the combustion chamber. In my own experience I have found that getting the ports to flow at low valve lift seems to go hand in hand with a broad torque band and that translates into better drivability. Of course there are other factors that influence the width of the torque band of an engine but they are all tied to the breathing. The intake manifold for instance is very key as it is upstream from the ports of the cylinder head. Turbo/supercharging, because of the huge benefit of the denser air can sometimes allow engines to get away with a lot. most manifold have literally sharp 90 degree corners in it but the engine makes (for most people) ample power. The bottom line is that every time the air has to change direction you need to gently convince it to do so, such that the amount of energy it looses through pumping losses is minimized. If you look at custome made intake manifolds you can see the smooth trumpet shapes that are used to get the air to enter the runners with the least amount of turbulence developed. the straight smooth runners to minimize the pumping losses. These are very typical characteristics of what you would see on any sophisticated normally aspirated engine. The difference in the normally aspirated engine might be in the runner length as it would be tuned for optimum performance at a different Rpm range.
      As in the design of the Intake system the same things that are important to the normally aspirated engine are also important to the turbo. The headers don't have to be equal length but it helps if each of the pressure pulses going into the turbo impellers are equal. But here there is a difference from the normally aspirated engine which responds to a tuned length. The tuned length and proper collector actually help the flow of the normal engine by creating a negative pressure in the collector to help the next pulse flow out. The turbo has this hot housing and impeller stuck in the way so the equal pulses help but the pressure build prior to the Turbo negates any benefit derived from the a tuned length and collector.




      Modified by REPOMAN at 6:03 PM 4-26-2004
      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/user/RepomanPro

    6. Member COP TZR's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 29th, 2002
      Location
      Toronto, ON
      Posts
      6,487
      Vehicles
      '03 JETTA WAGON TURBOOOoooooo
      04-25-2004 12:28 AM #31
      so do we have a final answer for the belts and pulley? What belts to use with a 65mm pulley and no A/C?

    7. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2001
      Location
      Portland OR
      Posts
      5,994
      Vehicles
      1990 VW Corrado
      05-19-2004 12:15 AM #32
      setting the timing
      Service Adjustment Mode
      Before attempting to set the ignition timing or base idle speed the ECU must be put into service adjustment mode. This is done by making sure the engine is thoroughly warm and then disconnecting the multi-plug from the blue coolant temperature sensor while the engine is running.
      If the engine stalls at any point while making adjustments to the timing and base idle speed the multi-plug must be refitted to the coolant temperature sensor before re-starting the engine. Failure to do this will cause the ECU to enter ‘limp home’ mode. Adjustments will then not be possible until you have cleared the faults from the ECU memory.
      Ignition Timing
      The procedure in the Haynes manual will give a rough timing setting. To set the timing properly the following procedure is needed. Digifant has an unusual procedure for setting the timing so please follow the instructions carefully.
      With the ECU in service adjustment mode blip the throttle so that the engine revs past 2500 rpm. Do this four times.
      Increase the engine speed from idle to between 2000 and 2500 rpm and check the timing. This should be 6° +/-1°. If adjustment is needed slacken the distributor fixing bolts and turn the distributor until you have the correct timing.
      Allow the engine to return to idle speed and re-connect the multi-plug to the blue coolant temperature sensor. Blip the throttle three times, making sure the engine speed rises over 3000 rpm each time.
      Check the ignition timing now advances with increased revs by slowly increasing the engine speed while watching the timing marks. Without an expensive timing light you will not be able to accurately measure the advance, but it should be around 40° at 2800 rpm.
      Idle Speed
      Before attempting to adjust the idle speed make sure the ignition timing is correct. It is also worth taking the idle speed control valve off the engine and thoroughly spraying it with carburettor cleaner. If the engine has done any significant mileage you will be amazed at the amount of black goo that comes out of the valve.
      The regulated engine speed is controlled by the ECU and is not adjustable. The ECU regulates idle speed by opening and closing the idle speed control valve and also by making continuous small adjustments to the ignition timing. However for this to work properly the base idle speed must be set correctly.
      To set the base idle speed remove the breather hose from the pressure regulating valve on the cam cover and plug the hose. Start the engine and allow it to idle for a couple of minutes and then put the ECU into service adjustment mode by detaching the multi-plug from the blue coolant temperature sensor.
      Blip the throttle three times, making sure the engine speed rises over 3000 rpm each time. Allow the engine to return to idle and then use the idle adjustment screw to set the idle speed to 920 rpm +/- 25 rpm.
      Re-connect the coolant temperature sensor, unplug and re-connect the breather hose. The engine speed should now settle down to the correct regulated figure of 900 to 950 rpm.
      CO Adjustment
      Without an exhaust gas analyser there is no way you can measure the CO content. However don’t despair because the CO adjustment screw only affects the CO content at idle and the lambda sensor will adjust the idle mixture to the correct value – provided it is working OK.



      Modified by REPOMAN at 9:27 PM 5-18-2004
      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/user/RepomanPro

    8. 06-04-2004 04:58 PM #33
      Want to swap a G60 into a non-Ce2 car? jump over to this faq on the 16V forum.
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1305329

    9. Member dubstarks's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 4th, 2002
      Location
      Vermonter in Santa Barbara CA
      Posts
      1,912
      06-17-2004 12:35 PM #34
      I'm doing a G60 to MK1 swap I will be doing a detailed day by day proses with pics I'm planning to start the project the middle of July and plan to have it done by the end August if you are interested let me know [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

    10. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2001
      Location
      Portland OR
      Posts
      5,994
      Vehicles
      1990 VW Corrado
      06-17-2004 11:30 PM #35
      engine building tips
      When designing or building a turbo engine you must not think of air being blown into the engine. you must think in terms of the compressor supplying higher density air. Flow is Flow and whether it is water, thin air or dense air, with different Reynolds Numbers, the rules are all the same. All of the things that interrupt flow are just as prevalent in a turbo engine as in a normally aspirated engine. The Port shape and combustion chamber are no different than it would be if the engine was normally aspirated. the transition in the bowl area from the port entrance. The shape of the port is probably the most critical factor in how much power a given engine can produce and more importantly where in the rpm band does the power start and peters out. Remember , the higher intake manifold pressure developed by a turbo leads to higher velocity flow into the combustion chamber. In my own experience I have found that getting the ports to flow at low valve lift seems to go hand in hand with a broad torque band and that translates into better drivability. Of course there are other factors that influence the width of the torque band of an engine but they are all tied to the breathing. The intake manifold for instance is very key as it is upstream from the ports of the cylinder head. Turbo charging, because of the huge benefit of the denser air can sometimes allow engines to get away with a lot. most manifold have literally sharp 90 degree corners in it but the engine makes (for most people) ample power. The bottom line is that every time the air has to change direction you need to gently convince it to do so, such that the amount of energy it looses through pumping losses is minimized. If you look at custome made intake manifolds you can see the smooth trumpet shapes that are used to get the air to enter the runners with the least amount of turbulence developed. the straight smooth runners to minimize the pumping losses. These are very typical characteristics of what you would see on any sophisticated normally aspirated engine. The difference in the normally aspirated engine might be in the runner length as it would be tuned for optimum performance at a different Rpm range.
      As in the design of the Intake system the same things that are important to the normally aspirated engine are also important to the turbo. The headers don't have to be equal length but it helps if each of the pressure pulses going into the turbo impellers are equal. But here there is a difference from the normally aspirated engine which responds to a tuned length. The tuned length and proper collector actually help the flow of the normal engine by creating a negative pressure in the collector to help the next pulse flow out. The turbo has this hot housing and impeller stuck in the way so the equal pulses help but the pressure build prior to the Turbo negates any benefit derived from the a tuned length and collector.
      so to put it simply you can gain a great amout of power by
      head work . in any FI application the runner velocity is imortent by over porting the intake side you loose velocity
      and increasing the exhaust side you increase the volume
      there are many ways to do this ... bigger valves radious cutting the valve seats porting .... all will increase the power output.
      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/user/RepomanPro

    11. 07-07-2004 06:45 PM #36
      stolen from the 8v forum FAQ - good sites on Digifant:

    12. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2001
      Location
      Portland OR
      Posts
      5,994
      Vehicles
      1990 VW Corrado
      07-09-2004 07:29 PM #37
      you wanted it you got it thanks to a certin Vortex member who works for a certin company [you know who you are]
      I am Able to bring you
      Labratory comparionsen of the G charger and the Lysholm Twin Screw
      Enjoy.








      Last edited by REPOMAN; 08-08-2010 at 07:56 PM.

    13. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2001
      Location
      Portland OR
      Posts
      5,994
      Vehicles
      1990 VW Corrado
      07-10-2004 05:57 PM #38
      My 16v Lysholm build thread
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3826575



      Modified by REPOMAN at 10:04 AM 11-23-2008
      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/user/RepomanPro

    14. Member ButchHusky's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 23rd, 2000
      Location
      Oshkosh, WI
      Posts
      12,978
      Vehicles
      90 Corrado G60 & 08 Passat wagon TSI
      07-31-2004 01:52 PM #39
      Alright, here are the sizes of the vacuum caps I used when I removed my carbon canister: one 5/32" (3.96mm) for the back of the T-body, one 5/32" for the front of the plastic/rubber T coming off the intake manifold, one 3/16" (4.76mm) for the side of the plastic/rubber T and one 3/8" (9.53mm) for the side of the T-body. Don't forget to zip tie the caps!
      Brian

    15. Member bulldog2.G's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 25th, 2004
      Location
      camatortilla
      Posts
      8,114
      Vehicles
      Cablowrio, 012GLI
      09-23-2004 01:57 PM #40
      NON-Oil Cooler 8v coolant hose Part#'s
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1583272
      and on an unrelated note:

      Gravy's Coolant Flush: HIS Way. http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1704369

      Shawn's crank pulley fix..
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=1598023


      Modified by bulldog2.G at 10:08 AM 3-11-2005

    16. 05-13-2005 11:49 AM #41

    17. 07-16-2005 09:16 AM #42
      charger bybass belt lenght for 8vg60 stock without a/c is 1250mm. Marked QBR61250 i think it is 49.21 inch

    18. 09-22-2005 09:14 AM #43
      16v g60 intake elbow,


      For fun



      Modified by ntonar at 10:03 AM 1-26-2006

    19. Member clintg60-16v's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 13th, 2002
      Location
      Fishers, Indiana
      Posts
      6,397
      Vehicles
      '90 Corrado 1.9 16V Lysholm, '06 Passat 2.0T, '07 Passat Variant 2.0T, and ghosts of misc '75s...
      04-11-2006 07:53 PM #44
      Oil cooler installation
      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zer...age=2
      "Sense is something you can't even make sense of until you've been to the future, and spent time there..."

    20. Member psykokid's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 2nd, 2002
      Location
      Die Stadt der Engel
      Posts
      4,021
      Vehicles
      1976 Scirocco, 1997 Land Rover Discovery, 2014 Chevy Spark EV
      10-19-2006 06:40 PM #45
      info for when using the volvo oil cooler setup:
      when using the volvo thermostatic sandwich plate, the o-ring that goes between the plate and the stock vw oil filter flange is volvo part number 925093-7.
      the thread pitch for the volvo plate if you want to use an fittings and other lines is M16x1.5.
      the thread pitch of the stock volvo oil cooler is 1/2" BSP
      the thread pitch of the oil filter pipe is 3/4"x16. you can make life simple by just snagging the oil filter pipe from the junkyard when you grab the thermostatic plate. its the same size that vw (and most other european mfgs) use so it bolts right in and is the correct length
      You can't polish a turd, but you can roll it in glitter

    21. 01-20-2007 03:09 PM #46
      ABA EATON G60 .MOV
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com/sbrown1/o2/ABA-G60-eaton.MOV
      Another ABA Eaton .MOV
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...2.MOV
      more eaton vids
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...0.avi
      even more Eaton Vids:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...0.avi
      Silenced 20V (non-bbm kit)
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...V.WMV
      Chip Install Digi-1 vid:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...l.WMV
      Just a slow drive on I75:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...n.WMV
      Hanging in the Parking Lot with a guy with a gold scirocco g60 now lysholm:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...t.WMV

      Lesuirely Saturday drive:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...y.WMV
      Leisurely Sunday :
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...y.WMV
      Sunday Breaks:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...s.WMV
      Hanging out working on cars:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...y.WMV
      Another Hangout video:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...2.wmv
      2.0 16V with tiny t3-60 turbo gets squirrelly with fast boost spool:
      http://home.test-afl.tulix.com...t.wmv

    22. 01-28-2007 01:01 AM #47
      The Porsche 3.5 bar fuel pressure regulator is made by several manufacturers. It is up to you to verify the received part and its rating
      I dug up this file today cleaning up my old hard drive and contribute it to the faq:
      AIRTEX Part # 5G1305
      Motronic; 928 110 198 04, 944 110 198 04 ~$46.89

      STANDARD MOTOR PRODUCTS Part # PR67 ~ $59

      ACDELCO Part # 2172205 {#89054444}
      REGULATOR KIT,FUEL PRESS -; 0280160263 ~$55.79
      KEM 143-809 [EFI PRESSURE REGULATOR] Motronic; OE# 928-110-198-04;944-110-198-04;0-280-160-263 AIRFUEL ~44.88 bbautoparts.com
      Keep in mind the prices have probably gone up, you may have dealer access to these parts or 5 finger discounts. Also keep in mind this performance 3.5bar , make sure you get what you order. Some aftermarket places ship the wrong product.
      The Porsche Dealer part # is 944-110-198-04 if you work at porsche go for it.
      The Bosch part # of course is 0 280 160 263
      Stage 4 chips require this. Happy hunting on pricing. I spent a lot of time cross referencing these a long time ago and tried best effort to ensure the parts did indeed reference the 3.5 bar part but you know some of these folks (KEM??) probably some off brand.

    23. Member REPOMAN's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2001
      Location
      Portland OR
      Posts
      5,994
      Vehicles
      1990 VW Corrado
      07-25-2007 10:51 PM #48














      [IMG][/IMG] [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG] [IMG]http://**********************/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]
      500HP 1990 Cowrado
      Have a great Orwellian Day
      https://www.youtube.com/user/RepomanPro

    24. 02-18-2008 08:10 PM #49
      Hello, I'm putting a G60 from a passat syncro into my MK1 GTI. Do you know what kind of headders I shoud consider.

    25. Member L8 APEKS's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 1st, 2006
      Location
      SoCal
      Posts
      1,367
      02-23-2008 07:31 PM #50
      G60 (MkII) steering lock malfunction
      If you insert your key but your steering wheel remains locked or stuck and will not turn, your steering lock has malfunctioned. You do NOT have to spend $138 from the dealer to replace it! You can remove that pesky, weak attempt at "factory theft prevention" with the following tools:
      Bentley manual (section 48)
      Dremel w/ cutting disc
      Large flat-blade screwdriver
      Vise grips or channel locks
      Follow the directions to remove the lock cylinder from the steering lock assembly. Using the dremel, cut a slot between the two screw holes at the top of the assembly.
      Using the large flat blade, gently pry open the notch you just cut through the steering lock assembly. 3/4" should be enough for you to pull the "deadbolt" free from the steering column and remove the steering lock assembly from the shaft.
      Simply take your vice grips and pull the deadbolt and spring out from the steering lock assembly. Viola...it will never get stuck on you again, and you just saved $138 in parts and 2 hours of labor charges!
      Sean Williams :: SoCal

    Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •