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    Thread: Finishing the Galaxie - A Way Over Due Production

    1. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-16-2017 03:56 PM #151
      Quote Originally Posted by 10001110101 View Post
      The math is certainly right, but then you have to wonder if overdriving the alternator could do any damage. I could see slightly faster bearing wear and some additional heat as negatives. But with occasional use such as this car would see it should't really be an issue, just make sure your voltage regulator is doing its job.
      This is what I'm thinking. It's tough to get a gauge of how fast you can spin an alternator, but I've seen numbers like 18,000 rpm max. You would obviously expect shorter bearing life, etc winding it out that far for extended periods of time like on the track or drag racing, but this is a street car. It'll put around town with the occasional WOT fun.

      I plan on getting a 5250rpm (or close to) chip for my 6AL. If I get to a 3:1 ratio with a new pulley, it would mean the alt. would be spinning at 15,750rpm when I'm bouncing off my 6AL rev limiter. I generally grandma my stuff. If it ever does get wound out, it would be for seconds at a time. I think I'm gonna go for it

      Voltage regulator is working good. Needle stops moving up at 14v.

      EDIT: I guess the assumption I'm making is that nominal ratio is 3:1. If I get to 3:1 then my bearing life is nominal as well if that is typical from the factory. As-is at 2.36:1, my alternator will last till I'm eleventy-two.
      - Alex

    2. Member 10001110101's Avatar
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      03-16-2017 04:13 PM #152
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      This is what I'm thinking. It's tough to get a gauge of how fast you can spin an alternator, but I've seen numbers like 18,000 rpm max. You would obviously expect shorter bearing life, etc winding it out that far for extended periods of time like on the track or drag racing, but this is a street car. It'll put around town with the occasional WOT fun.

      I plan on getting a 5250rpm (or close to) chip for my 6AL. If I get to a 3:1 ratio with a new pulley, it would mean the alt. would be spinning at 15,750rpm when I'm bouncing off my 6AL rev limiter. I generally grandma my stuff. If it ever does get wound out, it would be for seconds at a time. I think I'm gonna go for it

      Voltage regulator is working good. Needle stops moving up at 14v.

      EDIT: I guess the assumption I'm making is that nominal ratio is 3:1. If I get to 3:1 then my bearing life is nominal as well if that is typical from the factory. As-is at 2.36:1, my alternator will last till I'm eleventy-two.
      I would go for it. Bearings are cheap if they do wear out. Looking into LED bulbs wouldn't hurt either. More light output for lower wattage. Just make sure to find bulbs that scatter the light in a uniform way, a lot of cheaper bulbs have nasty hot spots in them.

    3. Senior Member Air and water do mix's Avatar
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      03-16-2017 04:15 PM #153
      Quote Originally Posted by 10001110101 View Post
      The math is certainly right, but then you have to wonder if overdriving the alternator could do any damage. I could see slightly faster bearing wear and some additional heat as negatives. But with occasional use such as this car would see it should't really be an issue, just make sure your voltage regulator is doing its job.
      It wouldn't overdrive the alternator with a smaller crank and alternator pulley, though. It would have the same ratio as stock and everything else would be underdriven.

      Quote Originally Posted by 10001110101 View Post
      I would go for it. Bearings are cheap if they do wear out. Looking into LED bulbs wouldn't hurt either. More light output for lower wattage. Just make sure to find bulbs that scatter the light in a uniform way, a lot of cheaper bulbs have nasty hot spots in them.
      This.
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    4. Member Ace_VR6's Avatar
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      03-16-2017 05:40 PM #154
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      Tis a valid point. For no other reason, to have full brightness brake/tail/head lights at idle with the fan on. I don't want to sit at a light in the middle of the night with dim bulbs waiting for green.
      This is EXACTLY why I suggested the 3g conversion earlier in this thread to you. My fox did the same exact thing and when that old taurus fan kicked in she would almost turn the lights off it felt like haha. Granted now I moved to dual contour fans which pull less initial fireup juice but all the lights are bright and happy at idle at a light with the fan kicking. I tried all those other High power aftermarket alt. and never had luck with them. I know you want to keep it stock appearing but this is more of a safety update.
      Quote Originally Posted by 04_GLI_ View Post
      Yeah still drove it home bout 60 miles. Didn't know it was a broken timming belt, drove fine just made a lil noise.

    5. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-17-2017 06:28 PM #155
      Quote Originally Posted by Ace_VR6 View Post
      This is EXACTLY why I suggested the 3g conversion earlier in this thread to you. My fox did the same exact thing and when that old taurus fan kicked in she would almost turn the lights off it felt like haha. Granted now I moved to dual contour fans which pull less initial fireup juice but all the lights are bright and happy at idle at a light with the fan kicking. I tried all those other High power aftermarket alt. and never had luck with them. I know you want to keep it stock appearing but this is more of a safety update.
      I didn't ignore ya. I did see that powermaster makes a 3g in small ford. I already had my setup complete and wasn't done troubleshooting it, that's all

      Problem is, if we were to compare my alternator to powermaster's with the same pulley ratio, I believe I'd be in the same boat. Underdriven at idle. The powermaster benefits from its higher output, but it also comes with a 2.00 pulley, which would increase your at idle output. I've emailed back and forth with powermasters since your post trying to get one of their pulley's if it'll fit my .642 alternator shaft. So, thank you for the reminder. If not - as dumb as this sounds, I'm going to ask around about machining my pulley down or possibly reaming up the ID of a 2.00 pulley and bushing it to have a .642 ID. The only 2.00 pulleys I've found so far are around .669 ID.

      I'll keep hunting. Now to find a machinist with some spare time on their hands
      - Alex

    6. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-20-2017 01:11 PM #156
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      I didn't ignore ya. I did see that powermaster makes a 3g in small ford. I already had my setup complete and wasn't done troubleshooting it, that's all

      Problem is, if we were to compare my alternator to powermaster's with the same pulley ratio, I believe I'd be in the same boat. Underdriven at idle. The powermaster benefits from its higher output, but it also comes with a 2.00 pulley, which would increase your at idle output. I've emailed back and forth with powermasters since your post trying to get one of their pulley's if it'll fit my .642 alternator shaft. So, thank you for the reminder. If not - as dumb as this sounds, I'm going to ask around about machining my pulley down or possibly reaming up the ID of a 2.00 pulley and bushing it to have a .642 ID. The only 2.00 pulleys I've found so far are around .669 ID.

      I'll keep hunting. Now to find a machinist with some spare time on their hands
      Well, Summit's website was incorrect and March never got back to me. All small Ford alternator shafts/pulleys are .669 and have been for the past 30 years, as confirmed by the guy who rebuilt my alternator and has been rebuilding starters/alternators locally forever.

      The 2.00 powermaster pulley I ordered to play with fit like a glove. Belt is a little on the long side, but I'm spinning faster at idle now. Still not overwhelmed with voltage, but it's an improvement.

      The pulley was only $15, so I may play with it some more and correct the belt length. Progress is progress
      - Alex

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      03-20-2017 07:55 PM #157
      Something to think about with the charging system is to make sure the alternator is grounding efficiently. Quick test have the car idling with the headlights on and take a jumper cable from the alternator case to the battery ground post (if it's under the hood) or on the battery ground where it comes off the engine block. You can get some weird voltage readings with some of the bracket set ups. Even the stuff that looks like just regular aluminum can have some clear coating on it that can insulate the alternator.

    8. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-22-2017 12:17 PM #158
      Quote Originally Posted by NashGTI View Post
      Something to think about with the charging system is to make sure the alternator is grounding efficiently. Quick test have the car idling with the headlights on and take a jumper cable from the alternator case to the battery ground post (if it's under the hood) or on the battery ground where it comes off the engine block. You can get some weird voltage readings with some of the bracket set ups. Even the stuff that looks like just regular aluminum can have some clear coating on it that can insulate the alternator.
      I've actually never had a 1-wire alternator, but I assume that's what you're talking about. One wire comes off to battery and ground is handled through the bolts and brackets..

      Mine is externally regulated, so it has it's own separate ground wire to chassis. Your point is still valid and made me go back and double check my wire gages.

      After reviewing, I'm going to up my gage for both battery and ground off the alternator to 6ga. for 90Amps

      I have a 1.92dia. pulley on now with a shorter belt. Leaves me at about 17,500rpm alternator speed when my 6AL hits its new 5300 rev limiter. Once I've installed my bigger wires I'll give it another try. This is about as good as my charging situation gets without going up in alternator output, which I don't really need or want.
      - Alex

    9. Senior Member Air and water do mix's Avatar
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      03-22-2017 12:34 PM #159
      I think he's talking about a good engine-to-chassis ground strap and possibly another for the alternator-to-engine, as the 1 wire setup is only the positive wire and it grounds through the brackets like every other alternator. He's just saying if you're running something like an aluminum alternator bracket (or coated steel for that matter) you might not have a good ground between the alternator and the engine, reducing voltage.

      In extreme cases I've heard of a throttle cable welding itself into place because the engine was grounding through it instead of a proper ground strap!
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    10. Member 16volt's Avatar
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      03-22-2017 12:40 PM #160
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      I've actually never had a 1-wire alternator, but I assume that's what you're talking about. One wire comes off to battery and ground is handled through the bolts and brackets..

      Mine is externally regulated, so it has it's own separate ground wire to chassis. Your point is still valid and made me go back and double check my wire gages.

      After reviewing, I'm going to up my gage for both battery and ground off the alternator to 6ga. for 90Amps

      I have a 1.92dia. pulley on now with a shorter belt. Leaves me at about 17,500rpm alternator speed when my 6AL hits its new 5300 rev limiter. Once I've installed my bigger wires I'll give it another try. This is about as good as my charging situation gets without going up in alternator output, which I don't really need or want.
      I have some 0 gauge welding cable I just bought for a project if you wanted to test with/use it.

    11. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-22-2017 01:20 PM #161
      Quote Originally Posted by Air and water do mix View Post
      I think he's talking about a good engine-to-chassis ground strap and possibly another for the alternator-to-engine, as the 1 wire setup is only the positive wire and it grounds through the brackets like every other alternator. He's just saying if you're running something like an aluminum alternator bracket (or coated steel for that matter) you might not have a good ground between the alternator and the engine, reducing voltage.

      In extreme cases I've heard of a throttle cable welding itself into place because the engine was grounding through it instead of a proper ground strap!
      No I gotcha. That all made sense. I'm just not sure that even applies to me as my alternator has it's own ground stud which is wired to my chassis ground. Any additional grounding experienced through the bolts would be gravy on top of the alternator's installed ground wire. The voltage regulator mounted to the side of the engine bay also has it's own ground. Still valid and very good info

      Concerning the engine ground - I didn't include a write-up about it, but I went back earlier and made sure my engine/trans is nicely grounded as well. The scary part is when I first got the car running years back, it had no ground strap from engine to chassis. I feel lucky I didn't burn this thing to the ground considering all the other garbage found.

      Stay tuned as I fumble through more automotive systems knowledge with only the internet to guide me

      Quote Originally Posted by 16volt View Post
      I have some 0 gauge welding cable I just bought for a project if you wanted to test with/use it.
      Thank you man, but I think 6ga. will be sufficient. 6ga. is recommended for up to 100amps constant, and my alternator is rated at 90amps. I also have 00ga. currently running from my starter relay under the hood to the battery in the trunk. The battery has it's own 00ga. ground to chassis in the trunk (neg lead). The starter relay has it's own ground as well, but Nash's comment got me thinking more - hence the up in size to 6ga. grounds, etc. Everything should be properly sized after I believe

      You guys are great. Thanks for watching
      - Alex

    12. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-24-2017 02:53 PM #162
      Working through this and finding more places to make car safer.

      Any of you have a relocated battery and have installed a fuse or fusible link on main battery cable? Looks like people use 250A/300A here.

      Something like this:



      Was considering a fusible link on the alt (+) wire and (+) to dash wire as well.
      - Alex

    13. Senior Member Air and water do mix's Avatar
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      03-24-2017 03:08 PM #163
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      No I gotcha. That all made sense. I'm just not sure that even applies to me as my alternator has it's own ground stud which is wired to my chassis ground. Any additional grounding experienced through the bolts would be gravy on top of the alternator's installed ground wire. The voltage regulator mounted to the side of the engine bay also has it's own ground. Still valid and very good info
      It sounds like you're well grounded then.

      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      Working through this and finding more places to make car safer.

      Any of you have a relocated battery and have installed a fuse or fusible link on main battery cable? Looks like people use 250A/300A here.

      Something like this:



      Was considering a fusible link on the alt (+) wire and (+) to dash wire as well.
      That would certainly stop battery current, but don't forget that it will do little or nothing once the alternator is spinning.

      I don't know anything about their practical use, though. It may indeed be beneficial, but it may not in a real world scenario. Certainly you'd want a way to start the car if the thing blew, as you'd have nothing once that happened!
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    14. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-24-2017 03:26 PM #164
      Quote Originally Posted by Air and water do mix View Post
      It sounds like you're well grounded then.

      That would certainly stop battery current, but don't forget that it will do little or nothing once the alternator is spinning.

      I don't know anything about their practical use, though. It may indeed be beneficial, but it may not in a real world scenario. Certainly you'd want a way to start the car if the thing blew, as you'd have nothing once that happened!
      I'd put another fusible link between alternator and battery to do that. If my fuse on battery (+) has blown I do not want to reapply power or start the car until the short is addressed The fuse is to prevent the 15' length of 0/2 from turning into a giant fire stick.
      - Alex

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      03-24-2017 08:24 PM #165
      If you are actually using the ground point on the alternator just make sure everything is clean and you should be good to go, I've seen way to many cars that just assume the thing is good grounding through the alternator bracket to the engine and then never checking it. We had a Cougar that had a serpentine set up by Concept1 and the charging was all over the place as the alternator was only case ground through the coated brackets and was dropping almost 2 whole volts through ground.

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