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    Thread: Don't forget to secure any loose items in the cabin before landing!

    1. Member mx5er's Avatar
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      03-07-2017 05:05 AM #1
      Yikes!!!



      Apparently, the flash seen when the Tomcat landed was the pilot being ejected!!! Right through the canopy

      One of the comment said the RIO in the back had secured a GPS unit onto a grab handle. But he didn't secured the GPS unit for the landing. So when the Tomcat landed, the sudden force from the landing dislodged the GPS unit which struck the rocket motor in the pilot's ejection seat. And since the pilot didn't initiate the ejection by grabbing the ejection handle, the canopy was still there and the pilot just shot right through it. Yikes.

      Second entry: http://www.anft.net/f-14/f14-serial-loss.htm

      So after the Tomcat came to a halt, I'm guessing the arresting wire was the only thing holding the aircraft in place while the RIO was just sitting there with the engines running. And I think I saw one of the deck crews run over and place a wheel chock to make sure the aircraft doesn't start rolling. I'm sure the first thing to do was to shut down the engines. Can the RIO do that? Or is there some sort of master switch mounted on the outside of the aircraft where a ground crew member could easily shut the whole thing down during an emergency?

    2. Member JTinFocus's Avatar
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      03-07-2017 08:58 AM #2



      So "...the pilot was recovered..." alive?
      Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Leary
      The universe is an intelligence test.

    3. 03-07-2017 04:14 PM #3
      I'll ask my dad if the RIO can shut it down, but I'd imagine so. On some planes there is definitely a manual firing possibility with the seats in the event that the canopy doesn't open...but jesus that'd suck. Normally you're best bet is to be tightened up and ready to eject when you do - not have it happen by accident at the moment when you're doing the most frightening thing you do on a carrier tour - landing, at night...

      At first watch I thought they made a bad landing and had jumped the gun and punched out. In many instances if you don't have enough fuel to go around again and you're on your last approach and f_ck it up you've got to punch out or ride it into the water, etc.

    4. Member NWarty's Avatar
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      03-07-2017 05:54 PM #4
      Love that site

      One of my favorites: On Nov. 6, 2002 this F-14 took off from Fallon Naval Air Station with a VIP in the back seat - a naval officer from the cruiser Anzio who was on what the military calls a "FAM Hop," or familiarization ride. In flight, when the pilot pulled a "negative 1g," the gravity force moved the officer nearly off his seat. He reached down to reposition himself and accidentally pulled the ejection lever. The cockpit canopy flew off and out went the VIP. The ejection system automatically opened the VIP's parachute. He landed safely in the Nevada desert and waited for his rescue. The F-14 returned to base.

    5. Member Geekengineer's Avatar
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      03-26-2017 08:06 PM #5
      Quote Originally Posted by NWarty View Post
      Love that site

      One of my favorites: On Nov. 6, 2002 this F-14 took off from Fallon Naval Air Station with a VIP in the back seat - a naval officer from the cruiser Anzio who was on what the military calls a "FAM Hop," or familiarization ride. In flight, when the pilot pulled a "negative 1g," the gravity force moved the officer nearly off his seat. He reached down to reposition himself and accidentally pulled the ejection lever. The cockpit canopy flew off and out went the VIP. The ejection system automatically opened the VIP's parachute. He landed safely in the Nevada desert and waited for his rescue. The F-14 returned to base.
      To me, that means he was not actually completely and fully secured in his seat. His harness was loose enough that -1g would cause him to float enough for him to feel the need to reposition himself? Also, you would hope that some form of discipline would be drilled into his head by the time he was a flag officer - "Do not touch anything unless told to touch it - sir!"

      But, hey, I'm just a civvy airplane nerd.
      "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away" - Philip K. Dick
      "Clamo, clamatis, omnes clamamus pro glace lactis!" - me
      "I'm an engineer - impossible just takes a little longer." - some guy on the interwebnetz

    6. Member mx5er's Avatar
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      04-03-2017 09:48 PM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by Elbows View Post
      In many instances if you don't have enough fuel to go around again and you're on your last approach and f_ck it up you've got to punch out or ride it into the water, etc.
      Wouldn't they just send out a tanker before it has to come to that scenario?

    7. 04-04-2017 10:21 AM #7
      Normally that's the solution. Sometimes it doesn't work out that way. There are situations where your refueling probe doesn't work, the basket is damaged or you can't take on fuel for some reason. Also, every additional tanker you send up means another plane which - in turn - has to find a way back onto the ship. If you're in inclement weather it becomes ridiculous. Highly recommend the PBS special on "pitching deck" if you can find it on YouTube. A simple training flight turns into like 6-8 hours of trying to recover aircraft...

      You also have incidents like this (fantastic work by the LSO)



      Caption from the video:
      During a storm in the Pacific Ocean, Atlas was down one set of landing gear. The rest of the squadron went and landed on a nearby island due to the storm, Atlas, had to dump his fuel and had one chance to land into the net. This is a great tribute to Bug Roach (Bug can be heard on the audio calmly talking the pilot down to the aircraft carrier) and his contribution to Naval Aviation. Footage is from March 9, 1987.

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