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    Thread: Brake upgrade suggestions- paging Metallitubby

    1. 05-19-2017 12:45 PM #26
      Quote Originally Posted by Nealric View Post
      No need to pay for drilled and slotted rotors. Drilled have no benefit other than looks. Slotted may have a marginal benefit, but not in a DD use case.
      Oh yeah, I get that, but they weren't actually expensive, and they're good quality as I drive them hard and haven't had overheating/warpage issues.

    2. Member evolDiesel's Avatar
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      05-19-2017 01:07 PM #27
      I had that powerstop kit on my 2011 Stage 2 TDI, with Motul fluid, and Tyrol SS lines, caliper stiffening kits and master bracket. Pedal feel was stiffer but that was about it. The brakes still overheated on any sustained, back road drive over 5 minutes long. Absolutely no comparison to my 2015 MK7 GTI brakes.

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    3. Member Dandbest's Avatar
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      05-19-2017 02:14 PM #28
      Quote Originally Posted by BUJonathan View Post
      Do you have the P/N of the FR caliper off hand?
      Same as 2005-2010 Odyssey-- SHJ

      Quote Originally Posted by jreed1337 View Post
      I'm not a big fan of powerstop... last time I used them was on my old Corvette, and they were pretty meh...

      Quote Originally Posted by Chazwozza View Post
      I went with the Powerstop slotted/cross drilled rotors, and Stoptech Sport pads on my Impreza, and they're awesome. The Stoptechs are Semi-metallics and initial bite is really good compared to the ceramics I previously had. If you can get them in CR-V fitment, do it.

      You might also be able to upgrade larger OEM brakes like from an Acura MDX or something bigger, that might help.

      EDIT: On further review, your CR-V should already have 11.8" rotors, which are about as big as they get for Honda. Only some Odysseys seem to have a 12.3" option.
      The plan currently is to do SS lines, cryo treated rotors, better brake fluid like ATE or Stoptech and some akebono pads.
      Last edited by Dandbest; 05-19-2017 at 02:32 PM.

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      05-19-2017 02:34 PM #29
      Quote Originally Posted by Dandbest View Post

      The plan currently is to do SS lines, cryo treated rotors, better brake fluid like ATE or Stoptech and some akebono pads.

      I'm not trying to be a dick but you're not going to solve your problem with that.


      Edit - I guess it depends on which Akebono pad. I assumed the ProAct Ceramics but I see there is another option for your application.
      Last edited by Jimmy Russells; 05-19-2017 at 02:40 PM.
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    5. Member Dandbest's Avatar
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      05-19-2017 04:25 PM #30
      Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Russells View Post
      I'm not trying to be a dick but you're not going to solve your problem with that.


      Edit - I guess it depends on which Akebono pad. I assumed the ProAct Ceramics but I see there is another option for your application.
      I was looking at the akebono performance pads, which seem to be semi metallic. https://www.tirerack.com/brakes/resu...utoModClar=4wd

    6. Member BUJonathan's Avatar
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      05-19-2017 06:17 PM #31
      Quote Originally Posted by Dandbest View Post
      Same as 2005-2010 Odyssey-- SHJ
      Without checking, I'm going to guess your pad options are equally limited even if you looked at Odyssey pads. However, I would ask on Honda-Tech or a similar forum if the Ody backing plate is shared with another application (e.g. Accord, MDX etc.). If the backing plate is common with another application, there's a good chance the pads will fit. Alternately, if you found someone with a generous return policy (e.g. Amazon) you can try just ordering pads from another application and do the guess-and-check method.


      The plan currently is to do SS lines, cryo treated rotors, better brake fluid like ATE or Stoptech and some akebono pads.
      My 2cents:

      SS Lines: Go for it. Relatively inexpensive and should help firm up the pedal.

      Rotors: If your current rotors are in good shape, just have them resurfaced on vehicle. Your Honda dealer should have a machine for this, and they usually don't charge much. If you have runout issues with your hub or bearing, the on vehicle resurfacing should help compensate. If your rotors are in good shape, you should get at least 1 resurfacing out of them (thickness limit is cast into the rotor hat, and the dealer should confirm the remaining thickness).

      Fluid: Skip the fancy brake fluid and just use Honda Genuine Brake fluid. The OEM Honda fluid is good. On a street car, you're not going to notice any difference with fancy stuff. And based on my sample of n=1 when I switched my BMW E30 over to ATE, my Clutch Master and Clutch Slave failed within two weeks of each other. Bad luck or related to the fluid, I'll never know.

      After flushing and bedding the brakes, do a few ABS stops to work out any bubbles from the ABS/VSA system. If you notice any change in pedal feel, repeat your flush and do another set of ABS stops until air is worked out of the system.
      =

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      05-19-2017 10:51 PM #32
      Quote Originally Posted by Dandbest View Post
      Hi all,

      I love my 2007 CRV, but the brakes are awful. Last year I put in new centric rotors and brembo street pads, and things improved over stock, but now a year later, the rotors are warped (again) and the pedal is mushy... so time to do the brakes again. Looking on tirerack, the options on pads are limited, and the only upgrade available for the rotors is to get the cryo treated ones. Not sure if that is worth it. Brake fluid was changed last year as well. I'm looking for good initial bite, as well as not warping the rotors annually. Anyone have any suggestions? For reference, this is the set up I have now, which I don't like very much- Brembo pads and centric plain rotors https://www.tirerack.com/brakes/resu...utoModClar=4wd

      Thanks.
      Before you start spending money on a new brake setup, dump your ceramic pads and try some semi-metallics. There arent alot of choices(since OE pad is ceramic), but centric, Bendix and Monroe seem to all have a semi-met option. Hawk and stoptech make semi-met or carbon street pads but for initial bite at cold temps, they aren't the greatest.

      Make sure to scuff up you current rotors to remove the layers of crap your ****ty ceramic pads have left on your rotor (which is causing them to vibrate), and lube up those calipers.

    8. Member O! VR6's Avatar
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      05-20-2017 02:14 AM #33
      Quote Originally Posted by Dandbest View Post
      Hi all,

      I love my 2007 CRV, but the brakes are awful. Last year I put in new ...
      Same car and same old feeling. Last year I replaced my front pads with EBC greenstuff. The initial break in period performance was amazing. Now they're a little better than stock with added brake dust. I think next time I'm going to step up to the yellow stuff series.
      Buy my stuff

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      05-20-2017 05:24 AM #34
      Quote Originally Posted by JOSHFL420 View Post
      rotors don't warp...they wear uneven...or have deposits.
      This is the correct answer. The claims in this thread that all pulsation issues are pad deposits are not correct.

      Excessive rotor runout is a common cause of uneven rotor wear, which leads to pulsation.

      Hey OP,

      When you redo the brakes you probably want to check the rotor runout to make sure it's in spec.

    10. Member Harpoon's Avatar
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      05-20-2017 08:03 AM #35
      Quote Originally Posted by stephen9666 View Post
      This is the correct answer. The claims in this thread that all pulsation issues are pad deposits are not correct.

      Excessive rotor runout is a common cause of uneven rotor wear, which leads to pulsation.

      Hey OP,

      When you redo the brakes you probably want to check the rotor runout to make sure it's in spec.
      Exactly, which is why he should have his rotors turned on-car with a ProCut. Not that it's common practice, but it would even be beneficial to turn brand new rotors with an on-car lathe to make sure the rotor runout is zero relative to the hubs. Some people don't think about it, but hubs are not perfect. You can take a perfect rotor that was done off the car, mate it to your imperfect hubs, and now the runout of course will be bad.

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      05-20-2017 09:16 AM #36
      Quote Originally Posted by Harpoon View Post
      Exactly, which is why he should have his rotors turned on-car with a ProCut. Not that it's common practice, but it would even be beneficial to turn brand new rotors with an on-car lathe to make sure the rotor runout is zero relative to the hubs. Some people don't think about it, but hubs are not perfect. You can take a perfect rotor that was done off the car, mate it to your imperfect hubs, and now the runout of course will be bad.
      that should ensure smooth running.

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      05-20-2017 09:31 AM #37
      This was partially mentioned, but not sure if answered...

      Can you swap out your brakes for a different model Honda/ Acura? Example the 3rd gen 4Runner are easy to swap Tundra brakes on.

      Quote Originally Posted by http://www.odyclub.com/forums/52-2005-2010-odyssey/152584-brake-upgrade-success.html
      Yeap.. I did the upgrade myself... I took a bit further with stainless steel braided brake lines (all 6), and DOT4 synthetic brake fluid /flush... but in reality, all you need are the following...

      45018-SZA-A01 caliper R ('10 Honda Pilot caliper assembly with carrier)
      45019-SZA-A00 caliper L
      45022-SZA-A00 pads (oem pad set is nice because it comes with backing plates, anti squeal compound, and wire springs to spread the pads)
      46472-568-000 x4 (crush washers for banjo bolts... brake line at the caliper)
      -Your choice of front brake rotors from: '09+ Honda Pilot / '07+ Acura MDX / '11+ Acura ZDX (they're all the same)
      -Brake fluid. 1 liter should be more than enough.

      If you know how to change brake pads, rotors, and bleed brakes (fronts only)...this job will be a piece of cake.
      Example I just swapped my stock "GTI" brakes to Porsche Boxster brakes.

      If you want to get nuts, someone here might be able to do this for you, but make carriers for new calipers if nothing off the shelf works. That is a long shot, but do-able. Cardboard a template, get measurements, send to someone with machining/ welding skills.
      Last edited by Aonarch; 05-20-2017 at 09:33 AM.

    13. Member Dandbest's Avatar
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      05-20-2017 09:36 AM #38
      Quote Originally Posted by Harpoon View Post
      Exactly, which is why he should have his rotors turned on-car with a ProCut. Not that it's common practice, but it would even be beneficial to turn brand new rotors with an on-car lathe to make sure the rotor runout is zero relative to the hubs. Some people don't think about it, but hubs are not perfect. You can take a perfect rotor that was done off the car, mate it to your imperfect hubs, and now the runout of course will be bad.
      I didn't think about the hub issue. At this point, I'll throw some new rotors on it, and see what happens... I really don't feel like paying the honda dealer to do the on car cut.

    14. Member Dandbest's Avatar
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      05-20-2017 09:41 AM #39
      Quote Originally Posted by Aonarch View Post
      This was partially mentioned, but not sure if answered...

      Can you swap out your brakes for a different model Honda/ Acura? Example the 3rd gen 4Runner are easy to swap Tundra brakes on.



      Example I just swapped my stock "GTI" brakes to Porsche Boxster brakes.

      If you want to get nuts, someone here might be able to do this for you, but make carriers for new calipers if nothing off the shelf works. That is a long shot, but do-able. Cardboard a template, get measurements, send to someone with machining/ welding skills.
      yeah, on a ten year old 100k vehicle... nah. Replacing all 4 rotors, pads and SS lines is a $600 affair, parts only (I'll install them myself), and I'm already questioning why I'm investing nearly 10% of the value of the vehicle. I do like it a lot, and its cheaper than a car payment every month, so it's happening, but unless I found the calipers and stuff on that list in a junkyard, I can't see it.

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      05-20-2017 09:44 AM #40
      Quote Originally Posted by Dandbest View Post
      yeah, on a ten year old 100k vehicle... nah. Replacing all 4 rotors, pads and SS lines is a $600 affair, parts only (I'll install them myself), and I'm already questioning why I'm investing nearly 10% of the value of the vehicle. I do like it a lot, and its cheaper than a car payment every month, so it's happening, but unless I found the calipers and stuff on that list in a junkyard, I can't see it.
      Why are you bothering with SS lines on this car again?

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      05-20-2017 09:49 AM #41
      Quote Originally Posted by Dandbest View Post
      I didn't think about the hub issue. At this point, I'll throw some new rotors on it, and see what happens... I really don't feel like paying the honda dealer to do the on car cut.
      But you'll gladly pay $600 to throw parts at the car? Does not compute.
      =

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      05-20-2017 09:53 AM #42
      Quote Originally Posted by Dubveiser View Post
      Before you start spending money on a new brake setup, dump your ceramic pads and try some semi-metallics. There arent alot of choices(since OE pad is ceramic), but centric, Bendix and Monroe seem to all have a semi-met option. Hawk and stoptech make semi-met or carbon street pads but for initial bite at cold temps, they aren't the greatest.

      Make sure to scuff up you current rotors to remove the layers of crap your ****ty ceramic pads have left on your rotor (which is causing them to vibrate), and lube up those calipers.
      Pretty sure the OE pads are NAO, not ceramic....
      =

    18. Member Dandbest's Avatar
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      05-20-2017 10:04 AM #43
      Quote Originally Posted by Harpoon View Post
      Why are you bothering with SS lines on this car again?
      cause they're cheap and should improve things

    19. Member Dandbest's Avatar
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      05-20-2017 10:08 AM #44
      Quote Originally Posted by BUJonathan View Post
      But you'll gladly pay $600 to throw parts at the car? Does not compute.
      I don't see it as "throwing". It needs brakes all around. I can guarantee you that at the honda dealer, they don't turn new rotors when they install them either. Not arguing the fact that it would make it "perfect" if it was done, just don't see the money end make sense. A new set of pads and rotors should solve the issue for the time being. This go around, I won't buy the cheapest chinese rotor available.

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      05-20-2017 10:55 AM #45
      If you need to buy pads and rotors on an annual basis then something else is the problem and yes it absolutely is throwing parts at it that will just have to be replaced again next year for the same issue.

      Stainless braided lines should improve *what* exactly? You don't need to improve feel for threshold at the track in your CRV. It's not my money so I don't really give a **** what you do, but you're essentially saying that the car isn't worth sinking excess money into, but then you're throwing hundreds of dollars of parts at it that won't even solve the problem.

      Forget the stainless lines. Doesn't matter if they're cheap because wasted money is wasted money.

      Call a dealer and ask what it would cost to have all four rotors turned on-car. Since your rotors are only a year old anyway, I would bet that even with the he pulsation they probably still have enough material thickness left to be cut. If not then the dealer will tell you they can't be cut and you'll have to get rotors. But you might be able to skip the new rotors altogether and make your existing rotors better than new and on-car non-machined. Tell them you do not want pads, you just want the rotors turned. They might refuse. Or they might do it. Won't know until you ask.

      If they will cut them on-car for you, then bring the car back home and change the pads yourself. Done.

      So you still spend money on pads. No change there. You still spent your rotor money except you spent it on a service that will actually make a dent in fixing your problem instead of just putting it off til next year again. And you saved a few bucks by not installing SS lines that will not help solve any of your issues anyway. Cheaper and more effective solution.

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      05-20-2017 10:59 AM #46
      Gotta love marketing

      Everyone touts SS lines, go cut a stock brake line. They are not a rubber hose. They just have a rubber lining over the stainless steel braiding that reinforces the inner hose. Hydraulic pressure cannot be contained in a rubber hose, you'd constantly be blowing them out. Sure some of the good replacements may use a thicker gauge of steel wire, but I wouldn't be surprised if some of the aftermarket solutions aren't just stock hoses without the rubber outer liner.

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      05-20-2017 11:16 AM #47
      Quote Originally Posted by Dandbest View Post
      I don't see it as "throwing". It needs brakes all around. I can guarantee you that at the honda dealer, they don't turn new rotors when they install them either. Not arguing the fact that it would make it "perfect" if it was done, just don't see the money end make sense. A new set of pads and rotors should solve the issue for the time being. This go around, I won't buy the cheapest chinese rotor available.
      What people are suggesting is to turn your existing rotors. If you have run out, the new rotors will eventually wear unevenly and cause what we call Disc Thickness Variation (DTV). Hondas in general seem sensitive to brake judder, IMO.

      If it were me, I'd rebuild what I have (turn the rotors, new guide pins and bushings, semi-met street pads). The braided stainless lines won't hurt. They'll increase your system stiffness a tad.
      =

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      05-20-2017 11:22 AM #48
      Quote Originally Posted by thetwodubheads View Post
      Gotta love marketing

      Everyone touts SS lines, go cut a stock brake line. They are not a rubber hose. They just have a rubber lining over the stainless steel braiding that reinforces the inner hose. Hydraulic pressure cannot be contained in a rubber hose, you'd constantly be blowing them out. Sure some of the good replacements may use a thicker gauge of steel wire, but I wouldn't be surprised if some of the aftermarket solutions aren't just stock hoses without the rubber outer liner.
      Most OEM brake hoses are not steel reinforced. They're EPDM rubber with with fiber reinforcement.

      Stainless Steel lines can stiffen the system a tad. Is it a huge difference? No, but an aware driver can notice the difference.
      =

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      05-20-2017 11:33 AM #49
      Quote Originally Posted by BUJonathan View Post
      Most OEM brake hoses are not steel reinforced. They're EPDM rubber with with fiber reinforcement.

      Stainless Steel lines can stiffen the system a tad. Is it a huge difference? No, but an aware driver can notice the difference.
      I still don't see the point in this application. Increasing pedal feel with aftermarket lines isn't typically a standalone mod that people do and then just say "ok, cool, this is it". You do lines to increase feel but in conjuction with fixed calipers, track pads, and higher temp fluid as a whole package. A stock floating caliper on a CRV is not going to offer tremendous feedback with or without aftermarket lines. It's just a point A to point B commuter. Who cares?
      Last edited by Harpoon; 05-20-2017 at 11:35 AM.

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      05-20-2017 11:37 AM #50
      Quote Originally Posted by Harpoon View Post
      I still don't see the point in this application. Increasing pedal feel with aftermarket lines isn't typically a standalone mod that people do and then just say "ok, cool, this is it". You do lines to increase feel but in conjuction with fixed calipers, track pads, and higher temp fluid as a whole package. A stock floating caliper on a CRV is still not going to offer tremendous feedback with or without aftermarket lines. It's just a point A to point B commuter. Who cares?
      In this case, it's a qualitative/psychological improvement. It will feel "different", but isn't going to change the car's street performance in a measurable way. This seems to be what the OP is going after.

      There is a measurable difference in fluid consumption for braided steel hoses vs. OEM-type rubber hoses, however.
      =

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