Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    VWVortex


    Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
    Results 1 to 35 of 107

    Thread: DIY - Replacing oxygen sensors

    1. 08-21-2003 12:04 AM #1
      I had some free time and all the necessary pics, so I put this little DIY together. Hope it's useful to someone.


      REPLACING OXYGEN SENSORS

      The following outlines the procedure for replacing oxygen sensors (pre-cat on OBDI cars and both pre- and post-cat on OBDII cars). The procedure was based on a 99.5 Jetta GLS VR6 (MKIV), however, it should be similar on other models and years. Please do these procedures at your own risk and be ready to make small adjustments while doing them. Also, please be observant while removing parts so that they go back together correctly.

      If you are replacing an oxygen sensor because of a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) and are not sure what sensor the code is referring to, Bank1-Sensor1 is the pre-cat sensor and Bank1-Sensor2 is the post-cat sensor on an OBDII car.

      For a MKIV car with a 12v VR6 engine, the part #s for the pre- and post-cat oxygen sensors are 021-906-262-B and 06A-906-262-Q (replaces 021-906-262-C), respectively. If you have another model/engine, you'll need to obtain the appropriate sensors for your car. Please verify the part #s with your parts supplier before ordering any parts. I am not responsible if you purchase the wrong parts for your particular car.

      I purchased the above oxygen sensors from http://www.1stvwparts.com. The pre-cat sensor ('B') was $28.99 and the post-cat sensor ('Q') was $15.86 (all prices were quoted online on 8/20/03). UPDATE: The prices for these O2 sensors have increase significantly over the past few years. You may be able to save some $$$ by buying the equivalvent Bosch sensors from your local auto parts store rather than buying it from VW. Bosch is the supplier to VW and the sensor that you can buy at your local store is identical to the one you get at a dealer, minus the VW logo, of course. The Bosch part numbers are as follows:

      Pre-Cat - VW #021906262B is the same as Bosch #17014
      Old Post-Cat - VW #021906262C is the same as Bosch #16119 (neither is no longer used)
      New Post-Cat - VW #06A906262Q is the same as Bosch #16121

      Finally, the time required to replace the oxygen sensors is varied and depends mostly on how long it takes to loosen or 'wake up' the threads on the old sensors. If the old sensors come out relatively easily (not likely if they've seen a lot of miles), you should be able to replace both sensors in an hour or so. Most likely, it will take some extra time to remove the old sensors - I'd plan on spending at least one hour per sensor. If you plan on replacing both sensors, you can try and save some time by performing the steps for loosening the threads (steps 15 through 17) on both 'old' sensors at the same time.


      __________________________________________________ __________________

      STEPS:

      1. The replacement of the oxygen sensors requires that the front end of the car (at least) be raised, either on ramps, on jack stands or on a lift. If you have ramps or access to a lift (lucky!), use them appropriately (much simpler, faster and safer than placing the car on stands) and proceed to step 5. If you do not have ramps or access to a lift, but have experience jacking your car up and placing it on stands, do this as you normally would and proceed to step 5. If not, you can consider using the method I used below.


      WARNING: DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PUT YOUR CAR ON STANDS IF YOU ARE NOT COMFORTABLE DOING SO. IF NOT DONE CORRECTLY, THE CAR MAY FALL, POSSIBLY CAUSING SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH. ONLY WORK NEAR OR UNDERNEATH A CAR THAT HAS BEEN PROPERLY SUPPORTED ... DO THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!


      2. Jack the car up using the pinch rails near the edge of the underside of the car. The pinch rail is indicated by the yellow arrow in the picture below and is the place used by the stock VW jack for raising the car. Make sure that the jack cup is centered on the jack point on the rail (indicated by the small indent on the lower side valence just above the yellow arrow). It is a good idea to place a thin piece of wood or hard rubber between the jack cup and pinch rail to help distribute the load and protect the underside of the vehicle from being marred. If you look closely at the picture, you should be able to see the jack on the far side of the car underneath the pinch rail. Note the 6" x 6" piece of plywood sitting on top of the jack cup.


      3. The jackstands should be placed directly below the major frame rails of the car, indicated by the red arrow in the picture above. Make sure that the stands are placed towards the very front of the frame rails - this is where they are strongest. If you place the stands too far back from the front edge, you run the risk of crushing the frame rail. Don't get too close to the curved front edge of the rail, however, as there is a risk of the jack stand slipping and the car falling. I placed the jackstands just below the small hole in the bottom of the frame rail (see picture above for approximate location of stands relative to the front of the frame rail). This seemed to me to be the best compromise between safety and rail strength. Again, it is a good idea to place a protective barrier between the jack stand and the frame rail - I used a double-thick piece of regular cardboard.

      4. Slowly lower the raised side of the car onto the jack stand. Repeat the above procedure (steps 2 and 3) on the other side of the car.


      WARNING: MAKE SURE THE CAR IS WELL-SUPPORTED BY THE JACK STANDS BEFORE DOING ANY WORK NEAR OR UNDERNEATH THE CAR!!!


      5. The location of the catalytic converter (the oxygen sensors are usually threaded into it) is indicated by the white arrow in the picture above. Similarly, the location of the plastic box that houses the oxygen sensor lead harness connectors is indicated by the green arrow in the picture above.

      6. Slide under the car and locate the black plastic box that houses the oxygen sensor lead harness connectors, shown in the picture below. It is located just to the inside of the main frame rail and along side the catalytic converter.


      7. Remove the two (2) 10mm plastic nuts (indicated by the yellow arrows in the picture below) that secure the box to the underside of the car.


      8. The picture below shows the sensor lead harness connectors inside the black plastic box. The harness connectors are attached to the box by tabs on either side of each harness connector. Slide the appropriate harness connector(s) off of the tabs to disconnect it from the box (this can be difficult to do - the fit is very tight). Note that the harness connector for the pre-cat oxygen sensor (6-wire) is larger than that of the post-cat oxygen sensor (4-wire).


      9. Separate the appropriate harness connector(s) by pulling up slightly on the retaining tab (indicated by the yellow arrow in picture below) with a screwdriver or other small, thin tool and sliding the two halves apart.


      10. Remove the protective heat shield from around the sensor leads by unsnapping the snaps indicated by the yellow arrows in the picture below (there are approximately 4-5 snaps).


      11. Remove the appropriate sensor lead(s) from the retaining clips on the underside of the car. One of the clips is indicated by the red arrow in the picture below.


      12. Now comes the fun part - removing the old sensors from the threaded bungs on the catalytic converter. The removal of the old sensors is often difficult due to the fact that the threads on the sensor seize inside the bung and are difficult to loosen or 'wake up'. This is especially true for sensors that have seen a lot of miles and seems to occur even when anti-seize is used on the threads prior to installation. The following steps will describe one way to loosen the threads on the old sensors. I'm sure there are other methods of loosing the threads on the old sensors. If you know of a way that works, go ahead and give it a try. If you've never done this before or have no idea where to begin (other than straining to turn the old sensors and possibly hurting yourself), give the following method a try.

      13. The loosening of the threads on the old oxygen sensors is much easier if you use the three items shown in the picture below. These items are a can of penetrating lubricant (PB Blaster, which is shown in the picture, is excellent), a small butane torch or other concentrated high heat source and a hammer. It is not necessary to use all three items to loosen the old threads, but using the three together in repeated sequence can greatly reduce the time and effort needed to get the old sensors out.


      14. Locate the oxygen sensor(s) on the catalytic converter. If you have an OBDII car, there should be two sensors. The pre-cat sensor is closest to the front of the car and the post-cat sensor is closest to the rear. The sensors should be located either on the sides or on top of the catalytic converter. The removal of the sensors is much easier is they are on the side of the cat. Unfortunately, the sensors on my MKIV VR6 are on top of the cat (not sure if this is normal or not). There is very little space up around the converter, making them even harder to remove. The pre- and post-cat oxygen sensors on my MKIV VR6 catalytic converter can be seen in the pictures below (the protective heat shield should already be removed from the sensors leads - the pics were taken out of sequence. Sorry.)


      15. Begin loosening the threads by spraying the PB Blaster or other penetrating lubricant into the crack between the sensor and the bung, as indicated by the blue arrow in the picture above. Spray enough lubricant to surround the threads, but not too much or it may start to drip into the catalytic converter. It doesn't matter if the old sensor becomes saturated with the lubricant, but it's probably best to keep as much as possible from actually collecting inside the catalytic converter. As long as you don't go crazy spraying the lubricant, you shouldn't have to worry too much. Give the lubricant a few minutes to do it's job.

      WARNING: PLEASE BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL WHEN USING AN OPEN-FLAME SOURCE NEAR OR UNDERNEATH THE CAR!!! THERE IS NO POINT IN HAVING WORKING OXYGEN SENSORS IF THE REST OF THE CAR IS A BIG PILE OF ASH, METAL AND MELTED PLASTIC!

      ATTENTION: IT IS A WISE IDEA TO TEST THE FLAMMABILITY OF THE PENETRATING LUBRICANT BEFORE PERFORMING THE NEXT STEP!!!

      16. Next, heat the bung on the catalytic converter with the torch for a minute or two. The bung is indicated by the red arrow in the picture above. The heat will cause the bung hole (please keep you comments to yourself ) to expand, making it easier to remove the sensor. Try and only heat the bung and not the sensor itself, so that the sensor threads do not expand too (the sensor will get hotter due to conduction, but not nearly as hot as if the torch were directed at it intentionally).

      WARNING: IF THE TORCH OR OTHER CONCENTRATED HEAT SOURCE IGNITES THE PENETRATING LUBRICANT (THIS DID NOT OCCUR WITH PB BLASTER), THEN STOP IMMEDIATELY!!!

      17. Finally, lightly hit the nut area (not sure what to call it) of the sensor (indicated by the green arrow in the picture above) with the hammer a few times to help loosen the threads. Ten or so hits should be good. Don't do all the hits in the same place, but instead spread them around the circumference of the sensor.

      CAUTION: IF YOU USED A TORCH OF OTHER CONCENTRATED HEAT SOURCE TO HEAT UP THE BUNG, BE CAREFUL NOT TO BURN YOURSELF WHEN PERFORMING THE NEXT STEP. THE AREA WILL BE VERY HOT!!!

      18. Using an oxygen sensor wrench (yellow arrow in the picture below) in conjunction with a socket wrench, attempt to remove the oxygen sensor from the bung by turning it counter-clockwise. If you do not have an oxygen sensor wrench, you can also use an open-ended 22mm wrench to do this. As a last resort, use an adjustable wrench. If you do, be careful that he wrench does not slip. You may have to apply some significant torque to get the threads to finally break free - please be careful not to hurt yourself. If the sensor does not turn, you can actually try tightening it slightly (turn it clockwise). Supposedly, this is an old mechanic's trick for breaking threads. Then try and loosen the sensor again.


      19. If the sensor still does not break free after all that, repeat steps 15 through 18 until it does. It may take a couple of cycles (it took 3-4 for my sensors) to finally get the sensor out.

      20. The picture below shows a new post-cat sensor along side the one I removed from my car. Surprising, the old one doesn't look too bad considering it was in use for 137k miles. The sensor actually still worked fine - I only replaced it as part of preventative maintenance and because it was so cheap. The same applies to the pre-cat sensor I removed from my car.


      21. Before installing a new sensor in the bung on the catalytic converter, make sure to apply some anti-seize to the threads of the new sensor. If you purchase an OEM VW sensor, it should come with anti-seize on it already. If your sensor didn't come with the anti-seize already applied, purchase some which is safe for oxygen sensors (silicone-free) and apply a little to the sensor threads. Be careful not to get any near or in the holes on the end of the sensor. This could potentially damage the new sensor.

      22. Using a paper towel or thin rag, wipe out the threads of the bung to remove any excess penetrating lubricant and then thread the new sensor into the bung. Tighten the sensor to 37 ft-lb (50 Nm). I didn't use a torque wrench to tighten the sensor - I just made it medium tight by feel.

      23. If you are replacing both sensors on an OBDII car, remove and replace the 'other' sensor by following steps 15 through 22.

      24. If you have finished removing and replacing sensors, secure the sensor leads, reinstall the protective heat shield, reconnect the harness connectors and reinstall the black plastic box that houses the harness connectors by following steps 7 through 11 in reverse.

      25. If the car was raised during the above procedure, lower the car using the appropriate steps for the lifting method used.

      26. Since the learned long term fuel trim values in the ECM memory depend in part on the condition of the oxygen sensors, it is a good idea to reset the values if you changed the pre-cat oxygen sensor (the post-cat sensor only monitors catalytic converter efficiency - it has nothing to do with fuel trim / engine control). To reset the fuel trim values, either disconnect the (-) battery terminal for approximately 15 minutes and then reconnect it (remember to have your radio code handy) or erase fault codes in the engine module (even if there are none) using a VAG-COM. The car may drive crappy for a little while since all the fuel trim values are now zero and other learned parameters have also been erased. These values and parameters should return to normal relatively quickly and the car should run normally after that occurs.


      Let me know if you have any questions.

      As always, do this procedure at your own risk. I am not responsible for any mistakes that you make.


      Thanks to Eric (BCDS2003T) for his assistance with the procedure, the use of his VAG-COM (for testing the old and new oxygen sensors) and the use of his parent's garage.


      Modified by VgRt6 at 12:10 PM 1-2-2009


    2. 08-21-2003 12:17 AM #2
      nice diy

    3. 08-21-2003 02:27 AM #3
      Another golden nugget of goody diy goodness from VgRt6, you really are the man

    4. 08-21-2003 10:49 AM #4
      Thanks. Morning bump for those who missed it last night.

    5. Moderator EPilot's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 27th, 1999
      Posts
      8,318
      Vehicles
      Present:2012 GTI Past: 99.5 GTI GLX, 95 Golf Sport, 78 Bus…
      08-21-2003 11:20 AM #5
      Added to the FAQ thread.

    6. Member GREGSGTI 1.8T's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2002
      Location
      PDX
      Posts
      4,084
      Vehicles
      MKIV GTI
      08-21-2003 11:48 AM #6
      Wow ...............................................
      Awesome details and instructions

      Great job Mang, If everything was this well laid out in the Bentley
      I would be able to perform more of these DIY's


    7. Member
      Join Date
      Apr 11th, 2003
      Location
      kansas
      Posts
      8,506
      Vehicles
      2004 vr6 gli 1989 16v gli 1992 GTI
      08-21-2003 11:52 AM #7
      "tigers will do anything for a tuna sandwich"

    8. 08-21-2003 12:08 PM #8
      for proper use of 'bung hole'

    9. Member ElectroMike's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 26th, 2002
      Location
      Exit 160, NJ
      Posts
      7,829
      Vehicles
      2006, Audi A4 2.oTQ
      08-21-2003 12:24 PM #9

      Another DIY job done well, I think you have a calling in a new life career!

      If you ever look for a job, feel free to use Vortex as your reference, I'll even write you a letter!


    10. 08-21-2003 12:29 PM #10
      Quote, originally posted by ElectroMike »

      Another DIY job done well, I think you have a calling in a new life career!

      If you ever look for a job, feel free to use Vortex as your reference, I'll even write you a letter!

      Haha. I'm actually writing a cover letter at the moment. Maybe I should mention the Vortex. That should get me hired!


    11. 08-21-2003 07:34 PM #11
      Bump for the after-work crowd.

    12. Moderator rs4-380's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 12th, 2000
      Location
      Maine
      Posts
      22,877
      Vehicles
      VWs & Audis
      08-21-2003 07:54 PM #12
      why is the bottom of your car so damn clean!
      Dave

    13. 08-21-2003 08:12 PM #13
      Quote, originally posted by rs4-380 »
      why is the bottom of your car so damn clean!

      I have no idea. The car's got 138k miles on it and has been parked outside all of it's life. I rarely spray the underside of the car when washing it too. It's probably all the rain the east coast has gotten this spring and summer.


    14. 11-28-2003 02:04 AM #14
      Awesome write up

    15. 05-10-2004 10:33 PM #15
      Pics are back online.

      Gary


    16. Member
      Join Date
      Jun 8th, 1999
      Location
      Boston, MA
      Posts
      1,083
      Vehicles
      2010 GTI 2.0T 6spd, 2001 GTI 1.8T 5spd
      07-17-2005 09:51 AM #16
      FYI,

      I just replaced my O2 sensors yesterday. The part numbers that Gary listed are still valid for the 12v VR6 from http://www.1stvwparts.com.

      Pre-cat: 021-906-262-B, $38.29
      Post-cat: 06A-906-262-Q, $18.25

      Prices were from July 2005.

      01 GTI 1.8T 195k
      06 Chevy Colorado 4x4 5spd 75k
      10 GTI 2.0T 6spd 60k

    17. Member MacDalund's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 30th, 2003
      Location
      Saint Paul, MN
      Posts
      891
      Vehicles
      2000 Jetta VR6
      12-19-2005 12:43 AM #17
      As of 12/05:

      021-906-262-B is $39.50
      06A-906-262-Q is $18.86

      Question: when searching on 1stvwparts.com for the latter part no. a lot of different years and engines appear but there is no selection for the VR6. When I search through their catalog for the O2 sensor by keyword I find a 2.8L Rear O2 listed for $125.70. Are these parts the same and can I just "pick" an option from the list when I search by part no. and buy a "1.8L" O2 sensor?

      My CEL is on and the Autozone scan comes back the dreaded P0420.

      I'm mentally ready to replace my cat because of all this but I was going to do the O2 sensors anyway for preventative maintenance and this is a cheaper way to possibly rule out having to replace the cat.

      I'm at 121k

      Rich Green
      2000 Jetta VR6

    18. Member MacDalund's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 30th, 2003
      Location
      Saint Paul, MN
      Posts
      891
      Vehicles
      2000 Jetta VR6
      12-25-2005 02:33 AM #18
      I replaced mine today and it only took one try to get the old o2 sensors out. I let them soak in some liquid wrench for about 20 minutes while I disconnected all the wires and they broke loose immediately. Here are pics of the old ones:

      Pre-cat

      Post-cat

      The pre-cat looks awful black to me. Is this a sign of anything bad going on or is this normal for 121k?

      Rich Green
      2000 Jetta VR6

    19. Member Fugee's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 22nd, 2003
      Location
      Las Vegas, NV
      Posts
      16,032
      Vehicles
      06 golf and a bad Cummins!
      12-25-2005 02:53 AM #19
      I gotta get arround to do mine soon

    20. Senior Member abydielsgli's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 7th, 2003
      Location
      the field of bakers
      Posts
      20,643
      Vehicles
      a few vw's and toyotas
      12-25-2005 02:55 AM #20
      always good diy's

    21. Member
      Join Date
      Nov 27th, 2004
      Location
      Charlotte, NC
      Posts
      7,121
      Vehicles
      2000 VW Jetta VRT, 2000 Audi TT Quattro
      03-05-2006 11:46 PM #21

      Replaced today on my VR6. Mine were pretty badly beat up after 135k, I must drive harder then Gary! The above part codes worked just fine. The 22 mm offset tool is a must for tightening the sensors back in. It's called a "Compact Offset Oxygen Sensor Wrench". Make sure you get the 22 mm version because there is a 7/8" one out there as well. Great DIY Gary.

      Mike

      Chapter 11 Dubs: Member #001
      http://www.chapter11dubs.com
      -----------------------

    22. Member zero666cool's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 17th, 2004
      Posts
      12,985
      Vehicles
      56 Merc 190SL, 66 Jag 3.8S, 13 Volvo S60R, 10 S40, 09 GTI, 12 Golf, 92 SLC, 89 GTI VR6
      04-26-2006 02:01 AM #22
      I can't get my O2s to open, I tried the liquid wrench stuff, and some other stuff, but nothing has helped, it is rusted badly. I had to cut off my bolts on the cat and downpipe side so it would come out, even then I had to hammer it hard to get it opened, it was welded with rust

    23. 04-26-2006 10:54 PM #23
      Did you ever get the answer to that question? I need to replace mine now and the prices have gone up. I don't want to pay 165 if I don't have to.


    24. 04-26-2006 10:55 PM #24
      Quote, originally posted by MacDalund »
      As of 12/05:

      021-906-262-B is $39.50
      06A-906-262-Q is $18.86

      Question: when searching on 1stvwparts.com for the latter part no. a lot of different years and engines appear but there is no selection for the VR6. When I search through their catalog for the O2 sensor by keyword I find a 2.8L Rear O2 listed for $125.70. Are these parts the same and can I just "pick" an option from the list when I search by part no. and buy a "1.8L" O2 sensor?

      My CEL is on and the Autozone scan comes back the dreaded P0420.

      I'm mentally ready to replace my cat because of all this but I was going to do the O2 sensors anyway for preventative maintenance and this is a cheaper way to possibly rule out having to replace the cat.

      I'm at 121k

      Yeah, this question.


    25. 04-26-2006 10:58 PM #25

    26. Member zero666cool's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 17th, 2004
      Posts
      12,985
      Vehicles
      56 Merc 190SL, 66 Jag 3.8S, 13 Volvo S60R, 10 S40, 09 GTI, 12 Golf, 92 SLC, 89 GTI VR6
      04-27-2006 12:40 PM #26
      Quote, originally posted by MacDalund »
      As of 12/05:

      021-906-262-B is $39.50
      06A-906-262-Q is $18.86

      Question: when searching on 1stvwparts.com for the latter part no. a lot of different years and engines appear but there is no selection for the VR6. When I search through their catalog for the O2 sensor by keyword I find a 2.8L Rear O2 listed for $125.70. Are these parts the same and can I just "pick" an option from the list when I search by part no. and buy a "1.8L" O2 sensor?

      My CEL is on and the Autozone scan comes back the dreaded P0420.

      I'm mentally ready to replace my cat because of all this but I was going to do the O2 sensors anyway for preventative maintenance and this is a cheaper way to possibly rule out having to replace the cat.

      I'm at 121k


      You can also splice your O2s, what year is your car? 1stparts had the price set to 18 untill a week or so ago for the precat I believe the 4 wire one, but now it is back to 92. ECStuning still sells it for $22.50 I just got 2 of them the other day before they raise the price again

      here is a post I created the other day:

      http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=2576309

      it might help you get the cheapest one...


    27. 04-27-2006 09:55 PM #27
      I've got a 1999 MKIV GTI VR6. I want to keep things OEM for now, so not too sure about the splicing. Just looking for the best price.

    28. Member zero666cool's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 17th, 2004
      Posts
      12,985
      Vehicles
      56 Merc 190SL, 66 Jag 3.8S, 13 Volvo S60R, 10 S40, 09 GTI, 12 Golf, 92 SLC, 89 GTI VR6
      04-28-2006 11:39 AM #28
      Actually that link that I sent you, ECS tuning one would've worked on your car as it was for MKVI and not MK3, MK3 guys had to splice it but it would've been plug an play for you, too bad they just raised the price today back to $99.99, while I purchased them for $22.00 2 days ago, I got lucky I knew it was gonna go up


      Modified by zero666cool at 8:40 AM 4-28-2006

    29. Senior Member mujjuman's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 29th, 2004
      Location
      New York
      Posts
      20,910
      Vehicles
      2001 VW Jetta VR6, 2006 VW Jetta 2.5
      10-07-2006 05:15 PM #29
      tahnks for the DIY
      mujjuman

    30. 10-18-2006 08:26 PM #30
      hi there
      is this DIY the same procedure for a 2002 Jetta 1.8T ?
      Is the layout of the sensors under the car the same ?

      thanks in advance


    31. Banned
      Join Date
      Aug 29th, 2001
      Posts
      10,348
      12-02-2006 06:39 PM #31
      Thanks for the DIY. WD-40 really helped get the old sensor loose.

    32. 12-03-2006 01:49 PM #32
      Quote, originally posted by puntadigital »
      hi there
      is this DIY the same procedure for a 2002 Jetta 1.8T ?
      Is the layout of the sensors under the car the same ?

      thanks in advance


      I replaced the front (pre-cat) O2 sensore in my 2002 1.8T GTI, and it looked pretty much identical.

      It'll be easy to figure out the pre-cat versus the post-cat sensors. Since the black plastic box that covers the connectors is basically within a foot or so of where the sensors are located in the exhaust system, it's pretty easy to figure out which connector goes to which sensor.

      Even though they use different connectors, it still makes sense to replace one sensor at a time to prevent the possibility of putting a front O2 sensor in the post-cat position...know what I mean?

      Good luck down there! And if you haven't already bought one, the oxygen sensor removing tool is pretty cheap at Advance Auto...I paid $11 for mine, and it says it has a lifetime warranty.


    33. 02-10-2007 05:31 PM #33
      great diy , completed both oxygen sensors in about an hour , a little wd-40 and they broke free really easy. thanks

    34. 03-13-2007 06:38 PM #34
      I can only find one sensor on the cat and it appears to be the post. The fault i am getting is for the pre cat. What am I doing wrong? Any help for a newbie is greatly appreciated. 2001 Jetta 2.0L.
      Thanks

    35. Banned
      Join Date
      Nov 24th, 2001
      Posts
      32,385
      03-13-2007 06:47 PM #35
      Quote, originally posted by cinzanoum »
      I can only find one sensor on the cat and it appears to be the post. The fault i am getting is for the pre cat. What am I doing wrong? Any help for a newbie is greatly appreciated. 2001 Jetta 2.0L.
      Thanks

      is it possible someone removed it and plugged the hole, thus a CEL????


    Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •