VWVortex.com - DIY - MKIV GTI, Golf, Jetta Compressor, TXV, Dryer
Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    VWVortex


    Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
    Results 1 to 25 of 51

    Thread: DIY - MKIV GTI, Golf, Jetta Compressor, TXV, Dryer

    1. Member
      Join Date
      Nov 27th, 2004
      Location
      Charlotte, NC
      Posts
      7,180
      Vehicles
      2000 VW Jetta VRT, 2000 Audi TT Quattro
      05-19-2007 10:31 PM #1
      DIY - MKIV A/C Compressor, TXV, and Dryer removal / replacement
      The following procedure will guide you through the removal and replacement of the aforementioned components. This will require a discharge and a recharge of the refrigerant and oil. If you have not done so already, it is important that you read the following documents below:
      https://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3238949
      https://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3226344
      When you purchase the O-rings from the dealer, make SURE that you have the right sizes and thicknesses. There are many, many different O-rings, so compare the sizes to each other, to the pictures below, and to your replacement parts.



      Please be careful when performing this procedure. You WILL need some mechanical aptitude, so read through the whole thing before trying it. I can't be held responsible if I have made a mistake in the following steps.
      Needed Parts
      -PAG oil (1 quart should be sufficient)
      -Refrigerant ( more then 30 oz)
      -Compressed air
      -Dry nitrogen
      -New TXV
      -New Dryer
      -New / Reman Compressor: VR6 engines use a 7 spline pulley. 2.0, 1.8t, and TDI all use a 6 spline pulley, so make sure you check your part number to the reman one.
      Needed Tools
      -Torx 35 screwdriver
      -Torx 25 screwdriver
      -Jack and Jackstands
      -blade screwdriver
      -Ratchet
      -13mm socket
      -16mm socket
      -17mm socket
      -Torque Wrench
      -M8 bolt (for the belt tensioner)
      -6 mm hex wrench
      -5 mm hex wrench
      -4 mm hex wrench
      -prybar or lever
      -plugs or tape to cover open lines
      Removing the Refrigerant
      1. In preparation for removing the refrigerant, remove the passenger's side engine cover by performing steps 1-3 of the Spark Plug Removal DIY.
      2. Remove the caps on the high pressure and low pressure ports.


      3. Turn off the A/C, and evacuate the refrigerant by whatever legal means you have at your disposal. Quite often, you will get some sort of credit from the mechanic who evacuates the refrigerant.
      4. With no refrigerant in the system, you will want to cover up the A/C button so you do not accidentially turn it on.

      Removing the necessary components
      5. Raise the front of the vehicle using your jack and jackstands.
      6. Remove the splash guard from under the vehicle with a Torx-25 screwdriver.

      7. Move the lock carrier to the "Service Position" by using this Lock Carrier DIY Guide. You do not need to do the Extreme version, you only need a few inches of clearance.
      8. Remove the passenger's side splash shield by unscrewing the two washer nuts shown below, and the single Torx 25 screw indicated. The splash shield should then slide down.



      9. Remove the serpentine belt by performing steps 3 and 4 of the Belt Tensioner Removal DIY. Hang it up to make sure you put it on the same way you took it off.
      10. Remove the A/C Compressor as follows:
      a) Slide the clutch coil connector out of its holder by pulling it straight towards you.

      b) Once loose, disconnect the plug from the socket.

      c) Remove the lower compressor hose by unscrewing the lock bolt with a 6mm hex wrench. WARNING:The refrigerant system is still pressurized!!! Be VERY careful disconnecting this line, as refrigerant and oil will spray from the fitting when disconnected.

      d) Remove the upper compressor hose by unscrewing the lock bolt with a 6mm hex wrench. Due to room constraints, you may not be able to disconnect this hose from the compressor until the compressor is removed from its mounting bolts.

      e) Remove the lower 16mm bolt holding the compressor onto the mounting frame.

      f) Unscrew the upper 16mm bolt holding the compressor onto the mounting frame. You will note that the bolt will not come out all the way, but it will *barely* clear the frame so you can remove the compressor.


      g) Use a lever of some sort to pry the compressor away from the frame. Slide it to the side to get it out.

      h) Cover up the ends of the hoses with a plug or tape to prevent debris from entering the lines.

      11. Remove the Dryer/Receiver as follows:
      a) Remove the banjo clamp holding the dryer in place with a 5 mm hex wrench. The bolt will come out all the way, and one half of the clamp will seperate from the other half.

      b) Remove the top and bottom hoses from the dryer with a 6 mm hex wrench. Note: The top and bottom bolts are different sizes, so make SURE you label them properly!


      c) Once the dryer is free, slide it out the clamp from the top.
      d) Cover up the ends of the hoses with a plug or tape to prevent debris from entering the lines.


      12. Remove the Thermal Expansion Valve (TXV) as follows:
      a) Unclip the black plastic housing surrounding the TXV. The latch is on the passenger's side, and rather difficult to get to.

      b) Here is a photo of the housing removed so you can see the latch. The black tab points down.

      c) Remove the engine side coupling clamp with a 5 mm hex head. This will allow you to remove the hoses from the TXV.

      d) Remove the top and bottom 4 mm hex head bolts that connect the TXV to the evaporator side coupling clamp.

      e) You can now remove the TXV. Pull straight out on it to slide it off the evaporator lines.

      f) Cover up both ends (4 lines) of the TXV connectors with a plug or tape to prevent debris from entering the lines.

      Testing / Cleaning your compressor
      13. If you have purchased a used or remanufactured compressor, you will want to test the functionality of the compressor as follows:
      a) The outer pulley should rotate freely, with no interference or motion on the inner pulley.

      b) Rotate the inner pulley counterclockwise ONLY. Make sure it is not bound; it may be difficult to turn, but it should turn freely.

      c) Test the coil resistance by connecting an Ohmmeter across the two pins on the connector. From 3 to 5 ohms is acceptable.

      d) Energize the coil by applying a +12 V signal to pin 1 (Green wire) and the ground to pin 2 (Brown Wire). This will connect the outer and inner pulley. Make sure they both rotate together when the coil is energized.

      14. You will also want to flush the compressor with PAG oil to clean out any dirt or debris. Do this as follows:
      a) Locate a measuring device of some sort. You want to be able to measure out oil in 1 ounce parts. I found that using my own Shot Glass would be more acceptable then using my nice All-Clad measuring cups. For reference, 1/8 of a cup is 1 ounce.

      b) Remove the compressor fill plug with a 17 mm socket. Then turn the compressor over and drain any residual oil.

      c) Using your measuring glass, add 2 ounces of PAG oil into the fill hole for the compressor.

      d) Re-install the 17 mm plug, and tilt the compressor on its pulley. Remove the tape covering the compressor ports. Note the labeling on the compressor, and add 2 ounces of PAG oil to the suction side of the compressor.

      e) With an electric drill, turn the compressor over counter-clockwise while covering the discharge port with a rag. Do this slowly at first to lubricate the pistons, and then faster until oil squirts out the discharge valve.

      f) The oil that squirts out will give you an indication of the cleanliness of the compressor. Repeat steps a-e until the oil is clean.
      15. Once you are satisfied with your flush, remove the compressor fill plug and drain any oil inside. Add 4.6 +/- .5 ounces of PAG oil to the compressor. This will provide lubrication for the entire A/C system.
      Flushing the rest of the A/C system
      16. To clean out the rest of the system, you will want to backflush the condenser and the evaporator with compressed air, and then nitrogen. Start by connecting your air source to the downstream side.

      17. Holding a rag on the upstream side to capture any debris or oil, turn on your compressed air supply. Do not apply more then 40 PSI to the evaporator or condenser.

      18. After you are satisfied you have collected most of the oil and debris, use your nitrogen supply to backflush the evaporator and condenser.

      Installing A/C components
      19. Starting with the TXV, lightly lubricate the evaporator side O-rings with PAG oil. Then install them on the evaporator connections.

      20. Slide the evaporator side coupling clamp over the lines, and then press the TXV into place. Reinstall the two 4 mm hex head bolts and torque to 8 Nm or until tight.
      21. Lightly lubricate the engine side TXV O-rings with PAG oil, and slide them on the appropriate lines. Slide the engine side coupling clamp over the lines, and fit the lines into the TXV.

      22. Install the 5 mm hex head bolt through the coupling clamp into the TXV. Tighten the 5 mm hex head bolt to 8 Nm or until tight.
      23. Reinstall the black plastic cover over the TXV.
      24. Slide the top bolt into the compressor, and fit the compressor into the frame. Then install the bottom bolt.
      25. When the bottom bolt is finger tight, push the compressor up so that you can install the top bolt. This parts really, really sucks.
      26. When both bolts are finger tight, torque the bolts to 45 Nm (33 ft-lbs).
      27. Lightly lubricate the compressor O-rings (part numbers: 7H0 820 898-14.3x2.4 and 8E0 260 749-10.8x1.82) with PAG oil and install them onto the compressor hoses. Install the hoses into the compressor and torque the 6 mm hex head bolts to 20 Nm (15 ft-lbs).
      28. Finally, install the dryer. Remove the caps and install with the label so you can read it. Lubricate the two O-rings (Part #s: 8E0 260 749-10.8x1.82) for the dryer with PAG oil, and then slide the hoses into the dryer. *Lightly* tighten the 6 mm bolts.
      29. Install the banjo clamp around the dryer, and tighten the 5 mm hex head bolt until tight.
      30. Now, torque the 6 mm hex head bolts on the dryer to 15 Nm (11 ft-lbs) or until tight. You do not want to torque these bolts until the dryer is fixed in the clamp.
      Leak testing the system
      31. Connect your manifold to the low and high pressure service ports. Connect the charging hose to your nitrogen supply. Make sure the low pressure service valve is closed, and then open the high pressure service valve. Then, pressurize the system to 200 PSI with nitrogen.

      32. Close the nitrogen supply and disconnect the manifold from the low and high pressure service ports. Wait one hour to ensure the system is still sealed.
      33. In the meantime, find some things to do. You can.....re-lubricate your serpentine belt tensioner. (Thanks, Gary!) Then, install the serpentine belt.

      34. After your hour wait is up, reconnect the manifold and check the high pressure side. If the pressure is approximately the same as it was, then your system is ready to be charged. Otherwise, you need to check all your fittings for leaks.
      35. Now, you can evacuate the system. If you do not have the proper equipment to do this, SKIP this step. You will want to evacuate the system for a minimum of 1 hour. Most vacuum pumps are designed for constant, 100% duty so let it run as long as you want.

      36. Once you have evacuated the system, properly charge the system with 26 +/- 1.8 ounces of R-134a. If you are familiar with charging refrigerant, then you can get the compressor to kick on by directly applying +12v to the coil as you did in step 13.d).
      Note: At this point, re-test the A/C system to make sure it works. If not, you will need to go back and check something.
      37. Return the lock carrier to its proper position.
      38. Reinstall the passenger's side splash shield.
      39. Reinstall the center splash guard.
      40. Lower the front of the vehicle.
      41. Reinstall the caps on the service ports.
      42. Reinstall the passenger's side engine cover.


      Modified by FaelinGL at 12:06 AM 7-10-2007
      Chapter 11 Dubs: Member #001
      http://www.chapter11dubs.com
      -----------------------

    2. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements
       

    3. Member chaugner's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 13th, 2002
      Location
      Miami
      Posts
      5,670
      Vehicles
      Audi TTQ, Touraeg, Passat
      05-19-2007 10:34 PM #2
      wow awesome writeup. Very detailed

    4. Geriatric Member CapeGLS's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 2nd, 2002
      Location
      Connecticut
      Posts
      35,212
      Vehicles
      01 Golf GLS 1.8T, 11 Jetta SE, 11JSW 2.5SE (Wifes)
      05-19-2007 11:20 PM #3
      Quote, originally posted by chaugner »
      wow awesome writeup. Very detailed
      ET Feature Car 1/08|Forgeline Wheels|WRDusa.com|

    5. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements
       

    6. 05-21-2007 03:18 PM #4
      Wow. Very nice!

    7. Member iae21's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 7th, 2002
      Location
      Staten Island, New York
      Posts
      6,525
      07-10-2008 07:34 AM #5
      Def bookmarking this one!

    8. Member
      Join Date
      Jul 8th, 2003
      Location
      Philly.
      Posts
      15,739
      07-10-2008 08:30 AM #6
      nice work [IMG]http://*****************.com/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

    9. 03-20-2010 07:34 PM #7
      Hello
      I want to thank FaelinGL for all the hard work put into this MKIV A/C Compressor, TXV, Dryer replacement.
      I read and re-read this work and gained knowledge as to how to pull this off on my wifes 2001 Golf 2.0.
      Thanks you I bought the parts and replaced them much per your article, and now find that after having a local AC man evacuate and charge the system with r134a, the AC now works and I saved many hundreds of bucks.
      The parts cost me around $500 all in, but that still way less than 1/2 what VW would charge for this procedure.
      Im very happy... this DIY article and the meticulous detail FaelinGL put into it are the epitome of what makes help forums in general and VW Vortex in particular the soul of the internet.
      Thank you Sir my hats off to you.
      Sincerely / edcetera [IMG]http://*****************.com/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

    10. Member
      Join Date
      Nov 27th, 2004
      Location
      Charlotte, NC
      Posts
      7,180
      Vehicles
      2000 VW Jetta VRT, 2000 Audi TT Quattro
      03-21-2010 10:17 AM #8
      Glad I could help
      Mike
      Chapter 11 Dubs: Member #001
      http://www.chapter11dubs.com
      -----------------------

    11. Member AustinVaughan's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 23rd, 2008
      Location
      Olympia Wa
      Posts
      5,328
      Vehicles
      MK4s: BMP .:R32, Imola 20th ae, tdi bug
      03-23-2010 03:26 AM #9
      very detailed. [IMG]http://*****************.com/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG] nice

    12. 04-24-2010 08:09 AM #10
      Excellent write-up. It was helpful for me even though I was just replacing the A/C compressor clutch coil.
      You mention only turning the compressor "counter-clockwise", but the arrow in the photo is pointing in the "clockwise" direction?

    13. Member DCMattius's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 28th, 2003
      Location
      Ormond Beach
      Posts
      179
      Vehicles
      2002 VW Jetta GLI
      07-19-2010 03:27 PM #11
      Bought the A/C kit from buyautoparts.com, had a local shop install it, now I have cold AC. The shop did tell me that the compressor was made in China, but so far so good.

    14. 08-29-2010 10:18 PM #12
      great writeup....i will be doing a compressor swap sometime this week

    15. 06-13-2011 09:51 PM #13
      Quote Originally Posted by FaelinGL View Post
      DIY - MKIV A/C Compressor, TXV, and Dryer removal / replacement
      The following procedure will guide you through the removal and replacement of the aforementioned components. This will require a discharge and a recharge of the refrigerant and oil. If you have not done so already, it is important that you read the following documents below:
      https://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3238949
      https://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3226344
      When you purchase the O-rings from the dealer, make SURE that you have the right sizes and thicknesses. There are many, many different O-rings, so compare the sizes to each other, to the pictures below, and to your replacement parts.



      Please be careful when performing this procedure. You WILL need some mechanical aptitude, so read through the whole thing before trying it. I can't be held responsible if I have made a mistake in the following steps.
      Needed Parts
      -PAG oil (1 quart should be sufficient)
      -Refrigerant ( more then 30 oz)
      -Compressed air
      -Dry nitrogen
      -New TXV
      -New Dryer
      -New / Reman Compressor: VR6 engines use a 7 spline pulley. 2.0, 1.8t, and TDI all use a 6 spline pulley, so make sure you check your part number to the reman one.
      Needed Tools
      -Torx 35 screwdriver
      -Torx 25 screwdriver
      -Jack and Jackstands
      -blade screwdriver
      -Ratchet
      -13mm socket
      -16mm socket
      -17mm socket
      -Torque Wrench
      -M8 bolt (for the belt tensioner)
      -6 mm hex wrench
      -5 mm hex wrench
      -4 mm hex wrench
      -prybar or lever
      -plugs or tape to cover open lines
      Removing the Refrigerant
      1. In preparation for removing the refrigerant, remove the passenger's side engine cover by performing steps 1-3 of the Spark Plug Removal DIY.
      2. Remove the caps on the high pressure and low pressure ports.


      3. Turn off the A/C, and evacuate the refrigerant by whatever legal means you have at your disposal. Quite often, you will get some sort of credit from the mechanic who evacuates the refrigerant.
      4. With no refrigerant in the system, you will want to cover up the A/C button so you do not accidentially turn it on.

      Removing the necessary components
      5. Raise the front of the vehicle using your jack and jackstands.
      6. Remove the splash guard from under the vehicle with a Torx-25 screwdriver.

      7. Move the lock carrier to the "Service Position" by using this Lock Carrier DIY Guide. You do not need to do the Extreme version, you only need a few inches of clearance.
      8. Remove the passenger's side splash shield by unscrewing the two washer nuts shown below, and the single Torx 25 screw indicated. The splash shield should then slide down.



      9. Remove the serpentine belt by performing steps 3 and 4 of the Belt Tensioner Removal DIY. Hang it up to make sure you put it on the same way you took it off.
      10. Remove the A/C Compressor as follows:
      a) Slide the clutch coil connector out of its holder by pulling it straight towards you.

      b) Once loose, disconnect the plug from the socket.

      c) Remove the lower compressor hose by unscrewing the lock bolt with a 6mm hex wrench. WARNING:The refrigerant system is still pressurized!!! Be VERY careful disconnecting this line, as refrigerant and oil will spray from the fitting when disconnected.

      d) Remove the upper compressor hose by unscrewing the lock bolt with a 6mm hex wrench. Due to room constraints, you may not be able to disconnect this hose from the compressor until the compressor is removed from its mounting bolts.

      e) Remove the lower 16mm bolt holding the compressor onto the mounting frame.

      f) Unscrew the upper 16mm bolt holding the compressor onto the mounting frame. You will note that the bolt will not come out all the way, but it will *barely* clear the frame so you can remove the compressor.


      g) Use a lever of some sort to pry the compressor away from the frame. Slide it to the side to get it out.

      h) Cover up the ends of the hoses with a plug or tape to prevent debris from entering the lines.

      11. Remove the Dryer/Receiver as follows:
      a) Remove the banjo clamp holding the dryer in place with a 5 mm hex wrench. The bolt will come out all the way, and one half of the clamp will seperate from the other half.

      b) Remove the top and bottom hoses from the dryer with a 6 mm hex wrench. Note: The top and bottom bolts are different sizes, so make SURE you label them properly!


      c) Once the dryer is free, slide it out the clamp from the top.
      d) Cover up the ends of the hoses with a plug or tape to prevent debris from entering the lines.


      12. Remove the Thermal Expansion Valve (TXV) as follows:
      a) Unclip the black plastic housing surrounding the TXV. The latch is on the passenger's side, and rather difficult to get to.

      b) Here is a photo of the housing removed so you can see the latch. The black tab points down.

      c) Remove the engine side coupling clamp with a 5 mm hex head. This will allow you to remove the hoses from the TXV.

      d) Remove the top and bottom 4 mm hex head bolts that connect the TXV to the evaporator side coupling clamp.

      e) You can now remove the TXV. Pull straight out on it to slide it off the evaporator lines.

      f) Cover up both ends (4 lines) of the TXV connectors with a plug or tape to prevent debris from entering the lines.

      Testing / Cleaning your compressor
      13. If you have purchased a used or remanufactured compressor, you will want to test the functionality of the compressor as follows:
      a) The outer pulley should rotate freely, with no interference or motion on the inner pulley.

      b) Rotate the inner pulley counterclockwise ONLY. Make sure it is not bound; it may be difficult to turn, but it should turn freely.

      c) Test the coil resistance by connecting an Ohmmeter across the two pins on the connector. From 3 to 5 ohms is acceptable.

      d) Energize the coil by applying a +12 V signal to pin 1 (Green wire) and the ground to pin 2 (Brown Wire). This will connect the outer and inner pulley. Make sure they both rotate together when the coil is energized.

      14. You will also want to flush the compressor with PAG oil to clean out any dirt or debris. Do this as follows:
      a) Locate a measuring device of some sort. You want to be able to measure out oil in 1 ounce parts. I found that using my own Shot Glass would be more acceptable then using my nice All-Clad measuring cups. For reference, 1/8 of a cup is 1 ounce.

      b) Remove the compressor fill plug with a 17 mm socket. Then turn the compressor over and drain any residual oil.

      c) Using your measuring glass, add 2 ounces of PAG oil into the fill hole for the compressor.

      d) Re-install the 17 mm plug, and tilt the compressor on its pulley. Remove the tape covering the compressor ports. Note the labeling on the compressor, and add 2 ounces of PAG oil to the suction side of the compressor.

      e) With an electric drill, turn the compressor over counter-clockwise while covering the discharge port with a rag. Do this slowly at first to lubricate the pistons, and then faster until oil squirts out the discharge valve.

      f) The oil that squirts out will give you an indication of the cleanliness of the compressor. Repeat steps a-e until the oil is clean.
      15. Once you are satisfied with your flush, remove the compressor fill plug and drain any oil inside. Add 4.6 +/- .5 ounces of PAG oil to the compressor. This will provide lubrication for the entire A/C system.
      Flushing the rest of the A/C system
      16. To clean out the rest of the system, you will want to backflush the condenser and the evaporator with compressed air, and then nitrogen. Start by connecting your air source to the downstream side.

      17. Holding a rag on the upstream side to capture any debris or oil, turn on your compressed air supply. Do not apply more then 40 PSI to the evaporator or condenser.

      18. After you are satisfied you have collected most of the oil and debris, use your nitrogen supply to backflush the evaporator and condenser.

      Installing A/C components
      19. Starting with the TXV, lightly lubricate the evaporator side O-rings with PAG oil. Then install them on the evaporator connections.

      20. Slide the evaporator side coupling clamp over the lines, and then press the TXV into place. Reinstall the two 4 mm hex head bolts and torque to 8 Nm or until tight.
      21. Lightly lubricate the engine side TXV O-rings with PAG oil, and slide them on the appropriate lines. Slide the engine side coupling clamp over the lines, and fit the lines into the TXV.

      22. Install the 5 mm hex head bolt through the coupling clamp into the TXV. Tighten the 5 mm hex head bolt to 8 Nm or until tight.
      23. Reinstall the black plastic cover over the TXV.
      24. Slide the top bolt into the compressor, and fit the compressor into the frame. Then install the bottom bolt.
      25. When the bottom bolt is finger tight, push the compressor up so that you can install the top bolt. This parts really, really sucks.
      26. When both bolts are finger tight, torque the bolts to 45 Nm (33 ft-lbs).
      27. Lightly lubricate the compressor O-rings (part numbers: 7H0 820 898-14.3x2.4 and 8E0 260 749-10.8x1.82) with PAG oil and install them onto the compressor hoses. Install the hoses into the compressor and torque the 6 mm hex head bolts to 20 Nm (15 ft-lbs).
      28. Finally, install the dryer. Remove the caps and install with the label so you can read it. Lubricate the two O-rings (Part #s: 8E0 260 749-10.8x1.82) for the dryer with PAG oil, and then slide the hoses into the dryer. *Lightly* tighten the 6 mm bolts.
      29. Install the banjo clamp around the dryer, and tighten the 5 mm hex head bolt until tight.
      30. Now, torque the 6 mm hex head bolts on the dryer to 15 Nm (11 ft-lbs) or until tight. You do not want to torque these bolts until the dryer is fixed in the clamp.
      Leak testing the system
      31. Connect your manifold to the low and high pressure service ports. Connect the charging hose to your nitrogen supply. Make sure the low pressure service valve is closed, and then open the high pressure service valve. Then, pressurize the system to 200 PSI with nitrogen.

      32. Close the nitrogen supply and disconnect the manifold from the low and high pressure service ports. Wait one hour to ensure the system is still sealed.
      33. In the meantime, find some things to do. You can.....re-lubricate your serpentine belt tensioner. (Thanks, Gary!) Then, install the serpentine belt.

      34. After your hour wait is up, reconnect the manifold and check the high pressure side. If the pressure is approximately the same as it was, then your system is ready to be charged. Otherwise, you need to check all your fittings for leaks.
      35. Now, you can evacuate the system. If you do not have the proper equipment to do this, SKIP this step. You will want to evacuate the system for a minimum of 1 hour. Most vacuum pumps are designed for constant, 100% duty so let it run as long as you want.

      36. Once you have evacuated the system, properly charge the system with 26 +/- 1.8 ounces of R-134a. If you are familiar with charging refrigerant, then you can get the compressor to kick on by directly applying +12v to the coil as you did in step 13.d).
      Note: At this point, re-test the A/C system to make sure it works. If not, you will need to go back and check something.
      37. Return the lock carrier to its proper position.
      38. Reinstall the passenger's side splash shield.
      39. Reinstall the center splash guard.
      40. Lower the front of the vehicle.
      41. Reinstall the caps on the service ports.
      42. Reinstall the passenger's side engine cover.


      Modified by FaelinGL at 12:06 AM 7-10-2007
      When you mention to back flush the system with Nitrogen, is it really important to do it with nitrogen? or can you use compressed air? is there an advantage to using Nitrogen? I just don't understand since I've seen it done with an air compressor in the past, and also, you mention to skip the evacuation step at the end if you don't have a pump, to evacuate, does that matter at all? should I just take it to a shop to have them evac. and fill after I've replaced the parts? any guidance would be appreciated, thanks!

    16. 06-14-2011 10:57 AM #14
      you dont want any oxygen or moisture in the system so compressed air is a no. you must evacuate the system to remove any traces of water vapour. this step cant be ignored. next time don't quote a 10 page post in your reply, its annoying to read.

    17. Member 1BadTitan's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 14th, 2010
      Location
      MD/PA
      Posts
      1,102
      Vehicles
      2010 Toyota Tundra Rock Warrior, 2015 Passat Sport, 02 GTI 1.8T, 05 Suzuki GSXR750, 03 Suzuki LTz400
      06-29-2011 09:58 AM #15
      But is nitrogen absolutly neccessary? I have the vac pum to draw the system down... Wont that get all the oxygen out by itself?
      If a$$holes could fly, this place would be an airport.

    18. Member odawg753's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 5th, 2008
      Location
      long island
      Posts
      341
      Vehicles
      2001 gti glx vr6, 1989 s10
      07-26-2011 10:19 PM #16
      you are my hero!!!!! thank you for this!! ive been looking forever for any good info on a/c on here, is this stickied some where and is there an a/c section? also im changing my txv, drier and compressor i dont have all the equipment you hade but would it be good enough if i just got it evacuated after i was all done?

    19. 08-22-2011 03:02 PM #17
      I keep seeing people jacking up the car from the front on these A/C diy posts. Can you tell me what they are using for a lift point?

      Also, is it necessary to move the lock carrier on a 2.0? I noticed I have a lot more clearance on my car than in the vr6 pictures.

    20. Junior Member rmetanes1's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 21st, 2008
      Location
      Israel
      Posts
      58
      Vehicles
      1998 / Golf / Vr6 / 5 door / 2.8CC & 2012 / MK6 / GTI
      02-29-2012 09:36 AM #18
      Quote Originally Posted by DCMattius View Post
      Bought the A/C kit from buyautoparts.com, had a local shop install it, now I have cold AC. The shop did tell me that the compressor was made in China, but so far so good.
      IS the Chinese compressor still working? Do you recommend it?
      Thanks
      1998, Gti-Vr6, 5 door, 2.8ltr,

    21. Member 24vNate's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 24th, 2007
      Location
      Florence, KY
      Posts
      279
      Vehicles
      2004 Jetta GL 1.8t PG
      05-15-2012 09:41 PM #19
      On a 1.8t, do you need to remove the alternator to get the compressor out?

    22. n00b
      Join Date
      Apr 11th, 2010
      Location
      Maine
      Posts
      2
      Vehicles
      99.5/VW/Jetta/VR6
      10-06-2012 11:10 PM #20
      Quote Originally Posted by beaker420 View Post
      you dont want any oxygen or moisture in the system so compressed air is a no. you must evacuate the system to remove any traces of water vapour. this step cant be ignored. next time don't quote a 10 page post in your reply, its annoying to read.
      Could CO2 be used instead?

    23. 04-23-2013 12:21 AM #21
      i followed the diy to the letter. used a new ac pump not re manufactured. I cleaned all lines with air then nitrogen flush. new thermal expansion valve, new drier, all new seals. pressure checked then evacuated the system. once i filled the system with the car running ac turned on i jumped the ac pump so it would run added the refrigerant and it only took about 18 oz. the ac was getting cold in the car but system quit taking the refrigerant. I can not get the system to run (compressor engage) without jumping it. also when i check the pressure with gauges the high and low sides are equal in pressure around 50 lbs each. any suggestions

    24. 07-22-2013 01:04 PM #22
      Thanks for this write up! I am now fairly confident that I can do this on my day (or two) off from work. So, I have my parts on order and am getting ready to delve into this project on my 2.0.

      A few questions on your write up though. 1 - I see that the Nitrogen flush should not be skipped if you are replacing the compressor, TXV and Dryer (and Hi/Lo Schroder Valves). Where does one find this in a suitable form? Would an auto parts store or hardware store have this?

      Also, when moving the lock carrier to the service position, I am unclear about the not-extreme version. Does this require removing the entire front end as shown in the linked DIY? I have seen others ask if it is even required on a 2.0, given that there is extra clearance, but no answers.

      Maybe after I complete this project, and my timing belt at the same time, I will start changing my own oil...

      Thanks again!

      Chris

    25. Member eurolicious's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 13th, 2009
      Location
      (678)
      Posts
      5,469
      Vehicles
      2003 Jetta Wagon GLS // 2007 EOS // 2012 Tiguan SE
      08-07-2013 09:42 PM #23
      Sorry to bump such an old thread but I have a few questions and I am doing this on a 1.8T.

      I have already had a shop drain all the freon there was in the system (system was still full as I have a compressor with no pressure).

      So I need to have the system filled with nitrogen or is just compressed air okay in this case?

      I ask that because the system will be vacuumed out again prior to the refill of freon.

      Also once the shop fill the system with their pump machine will they have to jump the low pressure switch prior to the system working?

      They have one of these machines:


    26. 01-15-2014 07:38 PM #24
      BUMP.

      Does the front end have to be pushed forwards on a 2.0?

      Can I simply, go to an ac shop, have it discharge, take it home, replace the parts myself, then drive it back to the shop and have them evacuate it/fill it/charge it?

      Thanks!

    27. 01-16-2014 09:04 AM #25
      I just replaced the whole system on my 2.0 this summer using this write up. I was able to take out and reconnect the compressor without removing the front end. It took some shimmying and was definitely a tight fit to get it out, but it is doable. However, the condenser line to the dryer was rusted tight and sheared off. You do have to take off the front end to get to the condenser! This is also doable in the garage though.

    Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    vwvortex.com is an independent Volkswagen enthusiast website owned and operated by VerticalScope Inc. Content on vwvortex.com is generated by its users. vwvortex.com is not in any way affiliated with Volkswagen AG.