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    Thread: Refinishing underbody of car without putting it on a rotisserie?

    1. Member hamradio's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 12:10 AM #1
      So,
      I've got an odd idea. I'd love to get all the old undercoating off my rabbit, por 15 the underbody and then undercoat over it. But, I really don't want to take it all apart to put on a rotisserie, nor do I have a nice smooth driveway to roll it around. Is it too ridiculous to put the car on jack stands and work under it for endless hours with a grinder with knotted wheel, removing undercoating, and then spraying or brushing por 15 underneath the car? Has anyone actually tried it? Or should I just take out my engine, drain my fuel tank, build a tiptisserie, and just lean it on it's side in my yard and redo the underbody?
      nasty rust for clicks- (I didn't break the flare, either, the screw hole was broken when I purchased the car)



      Modified by hamradio at 9:11 PM 3-28-2008

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    3. Member rallySOP's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 02:45 AM #2
      It seams like a lot of work to me to remove undercoat, POR, re-undercoat. If you've decided to do all that, why not disassemble, and make sure you get everywhere? Won't you want to drop the tank to get behind it anyway? Just my thoughts, but doing this job without removing everything would be like doing an engine rebuild just to reuse the old oil filter. Good luck with the project, it will take time and effort, but you will be so happy when its done.

    4. 03-29-2008 03:13 AM #3
      It Can be done with the car on jackstands. I did my 78' that way

      But, I'd reccomend you flip the car over. Saves alot of time and is far less dangerous

    5. 03-29-2008 07:31 AM #4
      My arms just gave in when I looked at that last pic. I fitted new control arms to my mk1 lying like that and all the memories of aching arms and shoulders just came back. I honestly need to start gym again.

    6. Member D.E's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 07:41 AM #5
      If you remove the engine and interior and just tip the car over, would you not damage the roof?
      VW-less at the moment...

    7. 03-29-2008 07:55 AM #6
      Quote, originally posted by D.E »
      If you remove the engine and interior and just tip the car over, would you not damage the roof?

      What is commonly known as a "rotisserie", is used to suspend the car off the ground so that the roof does not get damaged.
      The bumper mount points in the front and rear of the car are typically utilized to bolt steel or wooden beams to, which in turn are fastened to a modified engine stand, a rotating metal frame, or a rotating wooden assembly.

    8. Member D.E's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 08:00 AM #7
      I know that. I just wondered if it would be possible to roll the car over without one. I dont have access to one and I dont have the patience, money, resources and skills to build one.
      VW-less at the moment...

    9. 03-29-2008 08:10 AM #8
      I don't think it would be possible. The roof skin is just a flimsy piece of sheet metal, attached to formed sheet metal pillars. You could hand hacksaw out the pillars in less than half an hour.
      One might think that some rig could be attached to the rails, but I don't think, with maximum roof load for luggage racks listed at 50 lbs, that the roof would survive the pressure.
      The wooden models, for which there are plans for in the archives, look like they would be very easy to fabricate.
      This topic interests me because I'm looking at some involved rust repair work on an 84. I didn't realize how much rust there was on the bottom until I started poking around under there.


      Modified by chickenfriend at 8:16 AM 3-29-2008

    10. Member VWJerm's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 09:32 AM #9
      I did my truck while it was on jack stands, It took a long time but I also had a sandblaster to help remove all the undercoating. I wouldn't want to use a grinder and wire wheel tho, your arms will totally give out.
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    11. Member burn_your_money's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 09:50 AM #10
      you'd be crazy to do it from below with a grinder. I almost died doing the inside of my caddy with a grinder

    12. 03-29-2008 09:52 AM #11
      Quote, originally posted by burn_your_money »
      you'd be crazy to do it from below with a grinder. I almost died doing the inside of my caddy with a grinder

      Guess I'm crazy then
      But seriously, Wouldn't do it again.

    13. 03-29-2008 10:06 AM #12
      absolutely no way i would do this. at that point, i'd do an entire rebuild, and i dont think thats what you're going for.

    14. 03-29-2008 11:04 AM #13
      Why would you need to disassemble it? Drain all the fluids, remove bumpers if that's the mounting point you're using... and tip! Even the wooden ones, built well, should be able to tilt a Mk1 w. the motor in.
      Quote Originally Posted by Muffler Bearing View Post
      Oh god, those wheels! Kill them with fire!
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    15. 03-29-2008 01:43 PM #14
      ham your young and from reading local posts you have the attention span of a nat. Don't set yourself back months or years by trying to band aid the rust. Just get the thing running and enjoy it for now, worry about rust in the winter or start looking for a rust free shell to build up.

    16. Member otti's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 02:13 PM #15
      depending on wheather and founds i just would look for a place to lift it up for a weekend nicely, get to know some mecanics, maybe some shop ownwer lend you his garage for a weekend.
      there is a lot of do it yourself workshops around here where you can rent a workspace for a small charge per hour, try find somthing like that, get some friends together give everyone a grinder and a wire wheel and work it over in no time... [IMG]http://*****************.com/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]

    17. 03-29-2008 02:24 PM #16
      your gona want a tiptissery

    18. Member Tucked's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 04:39 PM #17

    19. Member bagpipegoatee's Avatar
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      ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
      03-29-2008 07:03 PM #18

      No damage to the car. I've lacked the time and motivation to make a real post, I'll do it soon, hopefully.
      Don't break my heart with your common sense.

    20. Member hamradio's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 07:14 PM #19
      lol, that looks kinda funny.
      I intend on doing this in late fall or winter. I'll be repainting the car at a point, so I'd like to strip all the undercoating off, redo the underside and fix the rust, and then comes the paint.

    21. Member bagpipegoatee's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 07:27 PM #20

      I used a yakima rack just like the one you have, and I moved the bars all the way to one side (the bars were too long).
      Not that I'd suggest you doing this, the rack was flexing a lot. If it broke, I'd be fine, but the car would be real dented. I figured it was worth risking dents on my rusty car compared to getting soaked in fuel while replacing the lines.
      Don't break my heart with your common sense.

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      03-29-2008 07:41 PM #21
      are you going to replace your wheel bearings after that?

    23. Member Tucked's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 07:50 PM #22
      Quote, originally posted by bagpipegoatee »
      No damage to the car. I've lacked the time and motivation to make a real post, I'll do it soon, hopefully.

      please do!!

    24. Member lagmywagon's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 08:01 PM #23
      Quote, originally posted by .:R-GTI:. »

      Thank you, I'm building one of these this summer. Im gonna add some casters so I can move it around when needed [IMG]http://*****************.com/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]


      Modified by ChasingRabbitsVW at 8:04 PM 3-29-2008
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    25. Member bagpipegoatee's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 11:11 PM #24
      Quote, originally posted by ArpyArpad »
      are you going to replace your wheel bearings after that?

      Why? How much force is applied laterally (to the car, almost vertically in real life) on the wheels? Let's say, 90 percent of the weight of the car. For ease, let's say .9G. When you're in a sharp corner, what registers on the "G" meter? I have a magazine that says a stock '75 rabbit with original 155/80/13 tires made .7G. I've heard of cars with real expensive tires getting over 1G. I'm sure that's not the most force those wheel bearings have seen. I did take the tires off, though, because they're not made to hold that force in one spot for a long time.


      Modified by bagpipegoatee at 8:15 PM 3-29-2008
      Don't break my heart with your common sense.

    26. Member bagpipegoatee's Avatar
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      03-29-2008 11:51 PM #25
      Quote, originally posted by .:R-GTI:. »
      please do!!

      Oh, I will. I'm just saving it for a day I have a lot of free time at the computer with nothing else to do.
      Don't break my heart with your common sense.

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