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    Thread: 020 5th gear swap

    1. 08-21-2008 06:48 PM #1
      I am getting ready to do the 5th gear swap in my 1993 Cabriolet and I read somewhere that it can be done while the trans is in the car. When I looked under there today, it looks like the cover will not clear the inner fender. Any advice?

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    3. Member tolusina's Avatar
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      08-21-2008 08:36 PM #2
      I just swapped mine in the car about 3 weeks back, took about two hours total, time will vary according to your experience level.

      You're a little ahead of my write up schedule, here are some tips anyway.
      Start be reading Broke's 5th swap pages, though he does it on a bench. http://www.brokevw.com/5thswap.html
      You'll need REAL snap ring pliers as Broke shows, plus the triple square socket he shows, don't even think about using an Allen wrench.
      You'll need something for the 27mm cap nut, he's got a couple of suggestions, I'll add a couple nut from the hardware store with a 1 1/16" hex filed down to fit.
      You'll need a jack, the stock scissors can work, you might need a couple of 2X4 blocks to jack the trans a bit both the relieve the load on the left mount for removal, agin to line the mount up during re-assembly.
      At the bottom of page 2 he shows a special tool for the 5th shift fork, you pretty much must have one. I made mine out of a 6" long 1/4" galvanized pipe nipple from ACE Hardware. I cut down to the tabs with a saber saw, a hacksaw can work too. I had to drill out the pipe seam with a 31/64" (I think that's what it was, just a little bigger than the pipe ID).
      Once in use it tried to thread itself into the shift fork and jam there, I hand filed it down a bit.
      ---
      On Broke's 1st page, 9th, 10th and 12th pictures, you'll see a rod with a spring on it, the 10th picture clearly marks it "Do Not Remove", he means it. The spring will have to come off, it'll be in the way, the rod MUST stay in place. The rod keeps all the shift forks lined up inside the transmission, remove it and you WILL have to open the case to re-install it.
      Don't confuse that rod with the clutch release rod, Broke's page 1, 10th pic, he's removing the release bearing, there's no clutch pushrod underneath because he's already taken it out of the other end, he's working on a bench unit.
      Your clutch pushrod will be under that bearing sticking out of the center of the input shaft, pull it out, look at both ends, one will be flatter than the other, near the end, put it back the same way.
      ---
      You'll also need the clutch cable disconnected and out of the way, a pan to catch the oil that will run out when the cover is removed, oil to refill.
      ---
      I tried to get clever and avoid the step removing the shift selector, no joy, it had to come out.
      I raised only the left front wheel on a ramp, steered full left lock for two reasons.
      One, I hoped with the car still on the wheels, brakes locked and trans in gear, I hoped to remove the large triple square nut without removing the selector. As I noted above, that failed.
      Two, I wanted a little help from gravity to keep the selector rod in place by tilting the car slightly down to the right. It worked ok, I didn't drop the rod, still, that rod kept me nervous throughout, I kept checking and pressing it back in. I think it's spring loaded inside, it tries it's hardest to get out.
      ---
      A couple years back as I changed my clutch, I made this cut to the inner fender well, it also provided just adequate clearance for the 5th in the car job. If I was doing it again, I'd cut a little higher.


      ---
      Don't ask about the fuel economy increase from the 0.71 just yet, results aren't in yet.


      Quote Originally Posted by kamzcab86
      I hate reading: "But I bought this car for $500 and don't want to put another dime into it."
      ____(hey, it's VW AND it's electrical, what's not to fail?) neoBentley+



    4. Member sehaare's Avatar
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      08-21-2008 09:09 PM #3
      Ok I won't ask about the milage, but how is the driveability with the new gear (any acceleration when in 5th or do you have to down shift to do anything)? How about the shift from 4th to 5th is it a pita?
      Steve
      Enjoy every sandwich - Warren Zevon

    5. Member tolusina's Avatar
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      08-21-2008 09:22 PM #4
      Depending on the grade and the approach speed, I sometimes have to use 4th, other times it stays in 5th, talking California freeways here, not Illinois flatlands. Depends on the size of the hole I'm shooting for while passing and it's rate of closure whether 4th is needed or not.
      Upshifts and downshifts haven't changed as far as driver effort goes, no reason it should.
      I can put along in oozing city traffic at 30 or so in 5th, any acceleration at that speed requires downshifting.


      Quote Originally Posted by kamzcab86
      I hate reading: "But I bought this car for $500 and don't want to put another dime into it."
      ____(hey, it's VW AND it's electrical, what's not to fail?) neoBentley+



    6. Member Broke's Avatar
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      08-23-2008 06:12 PM #5
      Quote, originally posted by tolusina »
      At the bottom of page 2 he shows a special tool for the 5th shift fork, you pretty much must have one. I made mine out of a 6" long 1/4" galvanized pipe nipple from ACE Hardware. I cut down to the tabs with a saber saw, a hacksaw can work too. I had to drill out the pipe seam with a 31/64" (I think that's what it was, just a little bigger than the pipe ID).
      Once in use it tried to thread itself into the shift fork and jam there, I hand filed it down a bit.

      Autotech lists them at $20, for future info [IMG]http://*****************.com/smile/emthup.gif[/IMG]
      Quote, originally posted by tolusina »
      I think it's spring loaded inside, it tries it's hardest to get out.

      It does have another spring on the other end, but the operation of the forks can also cause the rod to walk out... when adjusting the 5th fork, as you move the slider up and down locking and unlocking 5th to the shaft, the rod will come up a little each time.
      I've been caught once or twice forgetting about it and catching it when it was sticking up higher than I would like... I had a little sinking feeling in my gut until I got it slipped back into place
      How hard is it to do the job in the car without cutting the inner fender? Would the engine just need to come off the front, drivers, and rear mounts and be allowed to tip down on the passenger mount to get the needed room?
      020 trans info pages - www.BrokeVW.com
      NEW 0.7619 5th gears for the 020
      NEW 020 reverse gears
      '86 GTI 8V 2.0L -'88 Scirocco 16V - '10 F150 4x4

    7. Member tolusina's Avatar
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      08-24-2008 02:16 AM #6
      I made the cut out back when I did the clutch.
      I remembered back to the days of the shorter 4 speed transaxles when there was room to get the input shaft clear of the clutch without lowering the engine at all, made it real simple going back in too.
      I used to be able to change out a clutch on a 4 speed in 1.1 hours with air tools and a lift, pure gravy.
      Along came the longer 5 speeds and there wasn't enough room to pull the gearbox straight out, the engine had to be lowered quite a bit, then everything had to get raised and re-aligned on re-installation, times doubled or more wrestling with it. A2s and A3s were even worse.

      Once we started doing 5 speeds, we just had to deal with them as there were, I never did cut a customer car, just wouldn't have been right, but I did want to cut every one of them. I didn't hesitate to cut my own.

      Without the cut, front, rear and left mounts would all have to come off, the drivetrain lowered, maybe even one or both axles, the left might get in the way, the right might pull and bind or worse, come apart.

      Then, once the drivetrain is lowered far enough, that pesky selector rod will have gravity helping it to fall out and ruin your day, probably your whole weekend.

      With the cut, only the left mount needs to come off, the drivetrain sags only a little and a jack can prevent that.
      ---
      You posted such a beautifully dimensioned pic of the 5th fork tool, I just has to make it, cost 2 bucks, took 20 minutes including time to mess up the tabs twice before I got them right. The tool detail I havn't yet mentioned was at the other end, I stuck a 3/8" drive extension in the other end, squashed it down in a vise, worked just fine. Sooner or later, I'll post a pic of it.
      ---
      Oh, the selector rod only starts to come out when you're busy with something else, I think Murphy had a hand in that design.


      Quote Originally Posted by kamzcab86
      I hate reading: "But I bought this car for $500 and don't want to put another dime into it."
      ____(hey, it's VW AND it's electrical, what's not to fail?) neoBentley+



    8. Member tolusina's Avatar
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      08-29-2008 11:12 PM #7
      Pics of the hand made 5th fork tool.....



      You can see the bright places along the sides of the tangs that I had to file down during use. The O.D. in that area was just large enough before filing that the tangs tried to thread themselves into the threads on the shift fork and jam there.

      I also took an extra step on the tang end that probably wasn't needed, I heated that end to bright red with an oxy/mapp torch then quenched in cold water to harden it up a bit. I did that twice.
      In operation, it takes very little effort or force to turn the tool, hardening was likely un-necessary.
      ---


      And the squashed in a vise on a 3/8" extension end.....



      While I had the tool in hand for photographs, I double checked the I.D., I did drill it out with a 31/64" drill, just a little larger than standard 1/4" pipe I.D..



      Quote Originally Posted by kamzcab86
      I hate reading: "But I bought this car for $500 and don't want to put another dime into it."
      ____(hey, it's VW AND it's electrical, what's not to fail?) neoBentley+



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