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    Thread: Peloquin 02O 40/80% shim kit install DIY

    1. Member bronson75's Avatar
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      04-14-2011 12:47 PM #1
      If you're reading this, you know what it is, but if you don't:
      http://www.peloquins.com/products_80.html

      I got mine from Peter (http://www.thescirocco.com/peloquin.html)

      The kit comes complete and is fairly easy to install, this DIY will also help you replace your output flange seals if they're leaking (the kit includes new seals).

      I installed the kit on my '88 Scirocco 16v with a 9A. I autocross the car often and competitively, and thought the kit would be a good addition to my car. It isn't a true limited slip differential, but for the cash outlay (less than $100), it seemed like a good investment. Once the season starts I can give my impressions.

      First off, a bit of safety advice. I've been reading posts lately where people have gotten almost hurt, very hurt, or very dead while working under a car that wasn't properly supported.

      NEVER WORK UNDER A CAR THAT IS SUPPORTED BY A JACK ALONE, AND NEVER, EVER WORK UNDER CAR USING THE FACTORY JACK. They're called widowmakers for a reason. Get yourself a good set of jack stands and a set of wheel chocks.

      NO:



      YES:


      For the passenger side, you can get the inner CV off and up out of the way without messing with anything else, the axle is long enough. The drivers side is much shorter, so you'll have do some extra work. My ball joints have been replaced (with bolt-in units), if yours are the same, you're in luck. Remove the 3 ball joint bolts, and swing the bottom of the strut out. It's only about a quarter of an inch (if that), and you'll gain sufficient clearance to drop the inner CV down and out of the way. You shouldn't need to touch the axle nuts, or realign your car when you're done. If you have riveted ball joints, you'll need to do some work to get the axle out (which may include removing the strut), which might require an alignment.

      To get the inner CVs off the drive axles, you'll need an 8mm triple square tool. Don't try and use an 8mm hex, you'll destroy the heads and need ViceGrips to get the bolts out (ask me how I know, long story from long ago). Drivers side, you can use a long extension and get to them from outside the car, working in the wheelwell, the passenger side, you can get to them under the car. There are 6 bolts and 3 load-spreading 'washers' on each side. The passenger side axle will swing up and needs to be supported (tie wire, bungee), the drivers side can hang down along the side of the lower control arm.

      For access, I also removed the lower K brace and passenger side CV heat shield.

      Drivers side:


      Passenger side:


      Once the axles are off, the install procedure is the same on both sides of the car.

      The kit:



      I hijacked the writeup from Peter's webpage (with permission), I'll supplement it with my pictures and notes.
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Follow these directions for installing the 40% and 80% kit, the 80% kits has an extra step at the end.

      These kits should be installed in transmissions that are in good working condition. The kit is not designed to correct an existing problem, except for leaking CV flange seals. The kit comes with 2 CV flange seals and the spring compressor tool, that is needed to re-install the CV flanges, if you have leaking CV flange seals, this is the ideal time to do this upgrade. Repair any deficiencies before installing the kit, Before beginning it is recommended that the repair manual be consulted for transmission configuration and parts familiarization.

      1. Support the car in a secure position with the front wheels removed.

      2. Disconnect both left and right CV's from transaxle using 8mm 12 point socket. It is possible to install the kit with only the inner CV removed. To increase access, the axle assembly can be removed entirely by removing the outer axle nut. Before placing the car on jack stand, loosen the outer axle nut. Once the car is supported. Remove the 3 bolts securing the ball joint and the entire axle assembly can be removed. Alignment should be checked later as the ball joint removal may change camber settings. Or disconnect the ball joint, then there’s no alignment needed.

      3. Remove excess grease from the drive flange and remove the rubber cap (seal) with a screwdriver.



      4. Install the lOmm stud from the flange tool into the differential shaft. (Examine threads prior to threading bolt to verify condition of the threads. If necessary. clean with tap) Slip the clamp over the stud and install the nut. Tighten to keep pressure applied to the flange. The flange is under pressure from the spring and could come off with force if not properly removed.



      5. Remove the snap ring and discard (new ring supplied).

      6. Remove the flange tool. Save the concave washer if the 40% kit is being installed. It is not used on the 80% kit.

      7. The flange has a spring and spring seat. Clean and set these aside.




      8. The factory brass ring is now visible. it is one piece but most likely broken Into two pieces Remove it from the shaft. It is not reused. (It may be easier to remove with the seal In step 9 removed.)



      9. Remove the flange seal being careful not to damage the seal retaining surface.



      Old and new seals:


      10. Install the new lock ring with 45" surface toward differential. (the flange spring seat may aid in installation). With lock seated, place the thrust washer over the shaft. It can be held in place with a thin layer of assembly lube or grease.

      Old and new brass rings:


      Thrust washer in place:


      11. Install new seal. Place a thin film of grease on the O.D. and the l.D.. Tap in using a flat round plate. With seal In place, verify that the thrust washer is still in place.

      12. Install flange with spring seat on spring. Use the tool supplied to seat flange fully on to the splined shaft. Install the concave washer (pressure side out) on the 40% kit only. Install the new snap ring on both the 40 and 80% kits.

      This photo shows how the stack of parts will be installed, bottom up: flange, flange spring, spring seat, thrust washer, brass ring.


      80% installers: STOP HERE and see below.

      13. Remove flange tool and install rubber cap seal.

      14. Install CV's and torque to 33 ft./lbs.

      ****** 80% kit ******

      1. Complete all steps as in above through #11. Do not install concave washer, install snap ring only and remove tool.

      2. Install O-ring on cap. Clean threads in differential shaft and place small amount of red Loctite on threads of differential shaft (bolt has Loctite applied). Install cap assembly and torque 33-35 ft/lbs. (Cap can be held by placing 28mm bolts in flange and securing from rotation by using a pry bar, or screwdriver across the bolts.) Install the CV's as usual.

      I used blue Loctite on my CV bolts, my car seems some pretty punishing driving (especially autocrossing), it's not uncommon for my to have loose CV bolts. Not a happy thought.

      Caps and O rings:


      Cap installed:


      These are the parts you should be left over with (either parts removed and replaced from your car, or extra parts from the kit (40% guys):
      2 old flange caps/seals
      2 old flange seals
      2 old brass rings
      2 old concave washers
      2 old snap rings
      2 new caps/seals (40% guys)

      For some reason, my kit had 4 caps, since I did the 80% kit, I didn't use any of them.


      Thanks to Peter at for supplying the parts and directions, I'm looking forward to seeing how it does, once I get some decent test drives in.
      Drag racing is for fast cars, autocrossing is for fast drivers.
      www.madisonautocross.com
      www.scirocco.org

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    3. Member thescirocco.com's Avatar
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      04-14-2011 01:19 PM #2
      Nice write-up!

      It's most noticeable when it's wet out, it pretty much eliminates the side to side movement each time you shift.
      Peter call 3O2.605.3003 or [email protected] G mAiL
      Autotech, Peloquin differentials, and Motovicity Quaife dealer

    4. Member bronson75's Avatar
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      04-14-2011 02:32 PM #3
      Drag racing is for fast cars, autocrossing is for fast drivers.
      www.madisonautocross.com
      www.scirocco.org

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    6. Member Broke's Avatar
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      04-15-2011 02:12 AM #4
      Very nicely done write-up

      A few comments if you don't mind my adding them...

      Quote Originally Posted by bronson75 View Post
      Remove the 3 ball joint bolts, and swing the bottom of the strut out. It's only about a quarter of an inch (if that), and you'll gain sufficient clearance to drop the inner CV down and out of the way. You shouldn't need to touch the axle nuts, or realign your car when you're done.
      If you remove or loosen those 3 clamping bolts that hold the joint to the arm, won't the balljoint now move a bit in the holes in the arm? It has been too long since I've worked on my cars to recall if the MK1 is like the MK2 in that respect.

      If the MK2 joint bolts are loosened, the alignment changes, as you'll change the camber.

      If you remove the 17mm nut and bolt that holds the balljoint to the knuckle, the alignment won't change and you can then swing the strut/knuckle out to give room without changing any adjustments as the 17mm clamping bolt doesn't adjust.

      This info is also later in your post, in the instructions on Peters site...

      Quote Originally Posted by bronson75 View Post
      2. Disconnect both left and right CV's from transaxle using 8mm 12 point socket. It is possible to install the kit with only the inner CV removed. To increase access, the axle assembly can be removed entirely by removing the outer axle nut. Before placing the car on jack stand, loosen the outer axle nut. Once the car is supported. Remove the 3 bolts securing the ball joint and the entire axle assembly can be removed. Alignment should be checked later as the ball joint removal may change camber settings. Or disconnect the ball joint, then there’s no alignment needed.
      This portion of the instructions has been updated on Peloquins site with another option for the washer placement...

      Quote Originally Posted by bronson75 View Post
      10. Install the new lock ring with 45" surface toward differential. (the flange spring seat may aid in installation). With lock seated, place the thrust washer over the shaft. It can be held in place with a thin layer of assembly lube or grease.
      You can also capture the washer between the spring and the spring seat to help keep it in place. This info is on Gary's site, in the 80% install directions. Either placement position of the washer results in the washer eating up 2.0mm of space, which means the spring pushes harder on the bronze thrust rings and clamps that output shaft tighter to preload it more during cornering, or when the diff wants to unload into the one wheel that has slightly less traction.

      To give you a point of reference as to what to expect, I did a test comparing a stock MK1 diff, MK2 diff, 40% kit, and 80% kit, measuring the force needed to cause them to "break"... more info can be found here http://www.brokevw.com/difftest.html but basically the 80% kit should offer around 80 ft-lbs of preload, compared to about 30 ft-lbs or so for the stock diff (post-84 diff).

      Keep an eye on your passenger side flange seal for leaking... if you find it is wet, you'll have to replace that green seal sleeve. In the pics, yours is damaged and dented in that one spot, which may distort the seal enough to allow it to seep.
      The sleeves just press in, so to replace it just smack it with a hammer on the side (about like the damage to it now, only more force) and collapse it in on itself. It'll fall out of the trans. The new one is simply tapped in until it stops. This is the pic I mean...

      Quote Originally Posted by bronson75 View Post
      9. Remove the flange seal being careful not to damage the seal retaining surface.

      Good job on the pics and hopefully you'll be happy with the results. Gary did mention to me once that the kits do wear out and get more loose over time, he said after "a couple seasons" so if you notice that, you might be due for a new bronze thrust washer.
      020 trans info pages - www.BrokeVW.com
      NEW 0.7619 5th gears for the 020
      NEW 020 reverse gears
      '86 GTI 8V 2.0L -'88 Scirocco 16V - '10 F150 4x4

    7. Member bronson75's Avatar
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      04-15-2011 11:19 AM #5
      Broke,
      Since I studied your webpage and your diff test write-up, I feel honored to have you comment on my humble post! I'm by no means an expert, AFAIC, any information (as long as it isn't misinformation) is good to share. I'll add my comments.

      Quote Originally Posted by Broke View Post
      Very nicely done write-up

      A few comments if you don't mind my adding them...



      If you remove or loosen those 3 clamping bolts that hold the joint to the arm, won't the balljoint now move a bit in the holes in the arm? It has been too long since I've worked on my cars to recall if the MK1 is like the MK2 in that respect.

      --While there is some movement in the clamping bolts, I don't think there's enough to really affect the alignment all that much (in my case, YMMV). Usually, when I reinstall, I pull the bottom of the strut out as far as possible before tightening the bolts (I had my guy do that when he aligned it), so I have a pretty good point of reference to keep my alignment consistent.

      If the MK2 joint bolts are loosened, the alignment changes, as you'll change the camber.

      If you remove the 17mm nut and bolt that holds the balljoint to the knuckle, the alignment won't change and you can then swing the strut/knuckle out to give room without changing any adjustments as the 17mm clamping bolt doesn't adjust.

      --Another good option, I've always removed the clamping bolts.

      This info is also later in your post, in the instructions on Peters site...



      This portion of the instructions has been updated on Peloquins site with another option for the washer placement...



      You can also capture the washer between the spring and the spring seat to help keep it in place. This info is on Gary's site, in the 80% install directions. Either placement position of the washer results in the washer eating up 2.0mm of space, which means the spring pushes harder on the bronze thrust rings and clamps that output shaft tighter to preload it more during cornering, or when the diff wants to unload into the one wheel that has slightly less traction.

      --Peter, maybe you want to update your install instructions?

      --I didn't see that that had changed, I had read that the thrust washer wasn't to be installed between the springs and seat. That step would have simplified the install a bit, but the other way works as well (I'd probably encapsulate the washer between the seat and spring next time, though).

      To give you a point of reference as to what to expect, I did a test comparing a stock MK1 diff, MK2 diff, 40% kit, and 80% kit, measuring the force needed to cause them to "break"... more info can be found here http://www.brokevw.com/difftest.html but basically the 80% kit should offer around 80 ft-lbs of preload, compared to about 30 ft-lbs or so for the stock diff (post-84 diff).

      --Yep, I read your posts and page before I did the work, very well done and quite informative.

      Keep an eye on your passenger side flange seal for leaking... if you find it is wet, you'll have to replace that green seal sleeve. In the pics, yours is damaged and dented in that one spot, which may distort the seal enough to allow it to seep.
      The sleeves just press in, so to replace it just smack it with a hammer on the side (about like the damage to it now, only more force) and collapse it in on itself. It'll fall out of the trans. The new one is simply tapped in until it stops. This is the pic I mean...

      --Thanks for the inspection, I'll keep an eye on it. I did damage the sleeve the first time I did flange seals (way back when I was a newbie and didn't know any better), it leaked until I got rid of the car ('84 8v).


      Good job on the pics and hopefully you'll be happy with the results. Gary did mention to me once that the kits do wear out and get more loose over time, he said after "a couple seasons" so if you notice that, you might be due for a new bronze thrust washer.
      --I assume the brass rings would be available separately from the kit, I can see the rings wearing, but the thrust washer and bolt-on cap should be semi-permanent?

      --Thanks Broke! Hopefully this post (and updated information) will be a decent reference for others.
      Drag racing is for fast cars, autocrossing is for fast drivers.
      www.madisonautocross.com
      www.scirocco.org

    8. Member Broke's Avatar
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      04-15-2011 12:09 PM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by bronson75 View Post
      --I assume the brass rings would be available separately from the kit, I can see the rings wearing, but the thrust washer and bolt-on cap should be semi-permanent?
      Correct. The washer and cap shouldn't wear but the bronze ring will.
      The rings are available from VW, I'm not sure if Gary offers them separately or not.
      The VW rings are pricey at about $30 each at the dealer.
      020 trans info pages - www.BrokeVW.com
      NEW 0.7619 5th gears for the 020
      NEW 020 reverse gears
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    9. Member bronson75's Avatar
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      04-16-2011 12:10 AM #7
      I thought the rings supplied in the kit were different than what came stock?
      The rings I took out of my tranny were still intact, and I kept them (and they looked to be in very good shape), so it looks like I have a spare pair when I need them.
      Drag racing is for fast cars, autocrossing is for fast drivers.
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    10. Member Broke's Avatar
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      04-16-2011 12:38 AM #8
      Quote Originally Posted by bronson75 View Post
      I thought the rings supplied in the kit were different than what came stock?
      I don't have a kit here to check, so I'm not sure on that.
      They will have to be fairly close to the VW rings... if the dimensions are off too much it won't seat and the flange won't fit back in.
      If the material is different it won't be by much... too soft and it'll wear faster, too hard and it will wear the stub axles.

      I had bought some aftermarket non-OE rings from Mike at parts4vws.com once and they worked OK in a stock diff but then wouldn't work in the LSD, I think it was a wavetrac I was doing at the time. Fitting stock rings took care of the problem, so I know there are aftermarket rings out there.

      I don't know if Gary is using aftermarket rings or OE rings though... I thought they were factory rings, but it has been too long so I'm not sure.
      If you ring him up I'm sure he'd let you know and also tell you if he offers them outside of the full kits. If you find out, post it here

      Quote Originally Posted by bronson75 View Post
      The rings I took out of my tranny were still intact, and I kept them (and they looked to be in very good shape), so it looks like I have a spare pair when I need them.
      It is the inside bore that will wear out... the spinning shaft inside the softer bronze will cause the ID to expand over time, and it will clamp with less force than before.
      I'd still hang onto them though for sure
      020 trans info pages - www.BrokeVW.com
      NEW 0.7619 5th gears for the 020
      NEW 020 reverse gears
      '86 GTI 8V 2.0L -'88 Scirocco 16V - '10 F150 4x4

    11. Member thescirocco.com's Avatar
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      04-16-2011 04:04 AM #9
      Broke "You can also capture the washer between the spring and the spring seat to help keep it in place."

      ...That's a really good idea, especially when you're installing the kit on the car.

      On 100mm axles, I remove the ball joint, with it bolted to the A-arm...

      The brass rings do wear out, but they will last a long time, if you can keep it from slipping, basically by not giving it WOT - while you're making a sharp turn. ...If you autocross it, you will only get 1-2 seasons out of it.

      The 40/80% brass shims have a slightly sharper angle, and they don't fall apart, 2-3 sections, like the factory 2% shims.

      I need to do some editing on my site...
      Peter call 3O2.605.3003 or [email protected] G mAiL
      Autotech, Peloquin differentials, and Motovicity Quaife dealer

    12. Member MrMook's Avatar
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      05-26-2011 05:02 PM #10
      Great thread, thanks!
      I'm thinking of installing the 80% on a 2.0 Golf next year (daily/weekend autoXxer). Can't wait to hear your performance report with the stock diff

    13. Member bronson75's Avatar
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      05-26-2011 11:13 PM #11
      And here it is.
      After a little more than a month of enthusiastic DD use and 2 autocrosses, I have to say I'm on the fence about recommending this for autocross use. My car isn't stock, but I have only a few modest power gains (lightened flywheel, fuel-enrichment module), so I figure I'm running very close to stock HP and torque values (albeit with 145k on the clock).

      My initial impressions are:
      -Slightly better full-throttle launch modulation (I can still can get quite a bit of wheel spin at launch, but it's easier to tone it down with reduced input from the go pedal)
      -Under part-throttle cornering (especially in AX situations), the front end DOES seem to stick better, and turn-in feels more direct
      -Reduced low-speed steering effort (I had PS, and went to a manual rack)

      I haven't had many opportunities to test my biggest complaint about the open dif, full-throttle during hard cornering, where my car would ALWAYS light up the inside tire, and the car would oversteer way too much. The autocrosses I've run so far have been relatively low speed, with modest turns.

      I'll keep you posted, hopefully I'll realize a little more benefit as the season progresses.
      I still think for $100 (which includes new seals and the flange compression tool), it's money well spent.
      I think.
      Drag racing is for fast cars, autocrossing is for fast drivers.
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      05-27-2011 12:00 AM #12
      Quote Originally Posted by bronson75 View Post
      I'll keep you posted, hopefully I'll realize a little more benefit as the season progresses.
      I still think for $100 (which includes new seals and the flange compression tool), it's money well spent.
      I think.
      You sound slightly disappointed, but from what you describe, I'm impressed. For less than $100 + an afternoon in the garage (which is far less money and wrench-effort than a full LSD) you're seeing mild-but-noticeable traction gains. And that, honestly, is everything I'm hoping for.

      What I also like about this 80% kit is that it seems to give you a taste of LSD (pun sort of intended) but doesn't really put you at a loss if you decide to install one later. It's a complimentary kit that sounds like a good budget-friendly first step.

      Anyway, it's encouraging to hear that it's not just smoke and mirrors, and that it could be a handy addition when (and if) I decide to dump a little more HP into the ol' daily.

    15. Member bronson75's Avatar
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      05-27-2011 12:08 AM #13
      I'm certainly not disappointed.
      I think I had fooled myself into thinking I was going to get the almost all the benefits of a full LSD at 10% of the cost.
      I had been planning on installing the 80% kit for better than a year, and was EXTREMELY excited when it arrived and got to installing it. I do think it's living up to it's selling points, my mindset was a little clouded, that's all.
      Drag racing is for fast cars, autocrossing is for fast drivers.
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    16. Member prom king's Avatar
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      10-18-2011 09:48 AM #14
      So what's your opinion now after the season?

    17. Member bronson75's Avatar
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      01-11-2012 02:06 AM #15
      My latest update:
      My 80% kit took me to first place in my class last season. I'm pretty sure it DID help (read previous posts for reference). The car seemed to hook up better at launch, and it cornered better (although I could still spin the inside tire on tight, full-throttle corners).

      A caveat:
      In late July/August, I found there was a binding sensation in the driveline, during slow-speed acceleration. Jacked up the car, and there was noticeable inconsistent binding when turning the drivers side wheel in either direction. It seemed to go away, but on the road to an event about 2 hours from home, the trans popped out of 5th at highway speeds. I knew immediately I was low on fluid, but I kept driving. By the time I got to the event, I could barely shift, it felt like the trans was full of molasses. I loaded it up with 2 quarts of fluid, ran the event (it seemed to loosen up as the day went on), and drive home. By the time I got home, I couldn't find a gear to save my life. Found a 16v-prepped 4K locally (100mm flanges installed, and it came with a Peloquin kit! Dead ringer for my 9A). I took to the swap, and found that the center bolt that holds the seal cap to the output flange (in the Peloquin kit) had backed out and was floating around in the CV cavity. It had destroyed itself, the end of the output shaft was mushroomed and beat to hell, and the inner CV was polished up nice. Not sure if the bolt backing out was the main culprit of all my problems, but it certainly didn't help.
      And yes, I DID install the bolt correctly, with the proper torque, and with the preinstalled locking compound intact. No idea why it backed out.
      Pretty happy with the kit, aside from the whole it-destroyed-my-transmission-and-CV thing.
      I'll post pics of the carnage. Eventually.
      Drag racing is for fast cars, autocrossing is for fast drivers.
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      01-11-2012 12:09 PM #16
      Quote Originally Posted by bronson75 View Post
      I took to the swap, and found that the center bolt that holds the seal cap to the output flange (in the Peloquin kit) had backed out and was floating around in the CV cavity.
      Is the car lowered?
      Lowering it can cause the axles to sit in closer to the trans as the CV's telescope with the suspension movement.
      Alignment can cause it as well... the bottom of the steering knuckle is position by the ball joint, but that ball joint slides in and out of the arm a bit to adjust camber.
      Some adjustment is found at the top of the knuckle where the strut bolts on as well. Depending on what struts you have, there might be more adjustment than stock.

      If the bottom of the knuckle is shoved in and alignment is adjusted at the top you can end up with the knuckle sitting in closer to the trans.
      If you pull the bottom of the knuckle away from the trans, then try to bring camber into spec while keeping the knuckle pulled away, it can help prevent contact.

      Sometimes the stock center caps are worn through as well.

      If the stub axles in the trans are allowed to move out from wear in the parts internally, it can add to the problem by removing what little clearance is there to start with. There is the plastic thrust piece in the diff that spaces the spider gears in towards the center of the diff, if this is worn the spiders move out and the axles can as well.
      There is also the snap ring on the inside end of the stub axle that secures it against the spider gear. From the factory, they come with 2.0mm thick rings. VW offers a 2.3mm thick ring to help take up some wear of the parts and pull the axles back into the trans. This can help give a little more clearance.

      I've been asked before by the owner to shave the ends of the stub axles. There is some room to remove material, just a couple millimeters, but it can help by allowing the center cap to sit a little deeper into the flange to keep it away from the axle end. The owner also shaved the ends of the actual drive axles, knowing his car was lower than stock, to get more room.

      I'd have to go out and actually look a Peloquin center bolt over, but I recall they sit up a little bit over the top of the steel center cap of the 80% kit. I think you could shave a little off the top of the bolt and still leave the hex key hole deep enough to get a grip for installation and removal, but I'd have to check to make sure.

      The locking compound on the bolt won't work as well if the threads inside the stub axle are oily, so I always blast those clean with brake cleaner, then run a q-tip into the hole until it comes out clean, then rinse with fresh brake cleaner and hit it with the air line until the steel is dull and dry.

      A couple pics showing the ends shaved down about 1mm...


      020 trans info pages - www.BrokeVW.com
      NEW 0.7619 5th gears for the 020
      NEW 020 reverse gears
      '86 GTI 8V 2.0L -'88 Scirocco 16V - '10 F150 4x4

    19. Member bronson75's Avatar
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      01-11-2012 03:29 PM #17
      My car is lowered, it's sitting on H&R Sport springs over Koni yellows. Not a huge drop, but enough for me. When I had my car aligned last time, I made sure my ball joints were pulled out as far as possible before I tightened them down, because when I pull struts, I pull the ball joints. I reinstall them pulled out, so I have a fairly reliable reference point, so my alignment doesn't change (much). I have a feeling I didn't clean the bolt hole in the stub axle well enough, the bolt backed itself out, and did the damage.
      And yes, when the bolt cap gets installed, I'm pretty sure it pulls the output flange in a little farther, away from the circlip, and when the bolt backed out, some slop got induced in the inner works, and something got bound up and worn.
      I've never pulled a tranny apart, and now I have 2 that are bad. Sounds like a good time to crack one open and see what I can see.
      Drag racing is for fast cars, autocrossing is for fast drivers.
      www.madisonautocross.com
      www.scirocco.org

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