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    View Poll Results: Public School or Private School?

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    • Public School

      4 33.33%
    • Private School

      8 66.67%
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    Thread: Public School vs. Private School

    1. Senior Member
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      05-02-2011 10:08 PM #26
      As a Korean American, my parents always say I am lucky that they didn't force me to attend special prep schools. Very popular with Asians, they send their kids to public school then take them to these after school special prep schools. There you are being prepared for next semester material. Some of you might say Asian kids are smarter when in fact many already had special education in after school classes.

      Then on the weekend they may have to attend church schools. My parents are pretty liberal they didn't want to force me into a long life of extended schooling and end up becoming rebellious during teenage years.

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    3. Member
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      05-03-2011 08:22 PM #27
      I'm not sure I would want to put my kids through extended schooling. I think they need a good balance of in-class education and real-life experiences. My wife & I are in the mindset that we want to be involved in their growing and learning process as much as possible.

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      05-04-2011 11:02 AM #28
      My half-Korean kid will certainly be attending Korean school on Saturdays.

    5. Member robr2's Avatar
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      05-04-2011 04:56 PM #29
      It seems most kids in my town with a strong ethnic family goes to "cultural" school.

      My kids have friends that go to Hebrew school, Greek school, Filipino school all in the name of maintaining their family history.

    6. Member eluwak's Avatar
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      05-05-2011 01:35 AM #30
      Our oldest is starting K in the fall. We investigated a number of options but settled on the best private school in the area vs other private schools and public schools. The public schools and many private schools had large class sizes, were very disorganized, and after talking with several parents discovered they normalized students and excluded special needs from normal education (either by isolation or "special" classes).

      Our son has ADHD to the extreme, but he does extremely well in school when kept occupied. We had to be certain that his opportunities would not be limited because the teacher couldn't provide some extra attention to his needs. For instance, the school he will be attending has an on-site therapist to work with teachers to help them effectively teach our son. The private pre-K program he is in luckily has a teacher with excellent experience in teaching children with ADD which is why he has really blossomed.

      The downside to this is that I doubt we'll ever be able to afford a house again, and I haven't a clue what is going to happen when our 3 yo starts K. It would seem unfair to send one kid to the best school in the area and then have the other go to public school because we cannot afford the tuition for both. After all... tuition well exceeds 10% our gross income for each kid, and that doesn't include pre/after care, books, uniforms, etc. or where to send them during off days/summer vacation
      <insert comment here>

    7. Member Zombiee313's Avatar
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      05-05-2011 03:28 AM #31
      I went to private school from K through 12th grade and I turned out perfectly norm-norm-norm-norm-normal

    8. Senior Member FlashRedGLS1.8T's Avatar
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      05-05-2011 08:58 AM #32
      Quote Originally Posted by eluwak View Post
      Our son has ADHD to the extreme, but he does extremely well in school when kept occupied. We had to be certain that his opportunities would not be limited because the teacher couldn't provide some extra attention to his needs. For instance, the school he will be attending has an on-site therapist to work with teachers to help them effectively teach our son. The private pre-K program he is in luckily has a teacher with excellent experience in teaching children with ADD which is why he has really blossomed.
      If I had a child with severed ADD, I'd do the same thing you are doing. I hope it works out.

      Our son is special needs in a few ways but we've managed to keep him in our local public school thus far. He's exceptionally bright in most subjects but has some issues limiting him in other areas so we've been very diligent in watching how he's proceeding and keeping in touch with his teachers. From an education standpoint he's beyond anyone in elementary and many kids in high school but he's high functioning autistic, which presents a separate set of issues for him.

      Like I said, we've been very happy so far but once he gets into junior high I'm not sure we won't have to send him to a private school due to his course levels and social issues.
      He doesn't fit within the mold of "special" schools for disabled kids because he's high functioning and his intelligence is beyond where our local special needs schools are, so it's most likely on us to find a good place for him.

      I've always supported our local public schools and for most kids they are great, I'm sure my daughter will finish school from the public schools but I'm starting to see some limitations in some areas.

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      05-05-2011 01:55 PM #33
      Can't afford private and we live in a town that has great public schools.

      When my kids did go to private school (sponsored by my mother) we learned quickly that yearly cost is only the tip of the iceberg. All the other bits and pieces added up to A LOT.

      And there was no opt out of selling and other BS.

      Screw all that.

    10. Member
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      05-06-2011 12:01 AM #34
      Private schools really are a huge commitment. The $20-$25,000 annual tuition increases pretty rapidly to over $30k once all the associated costs are accounted for. My biggest dilemma is that if you don't enrol your child into a top private school but rather settle for a lower- or even mid-level private school, it will still cost a fair amount of money while the quality of the education might not necessarily be that much better than that of a top public school.

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      05-09-2011 11:30 PM #35
      I'd consider a private high school to make sure they're prepared for college. Then again many of the public schools around here are better than the privates, but you pay for it in housing.

    12. Member titleist1976's Avatar
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      05-11-2011 01:18 PM #36
      I don't know much about them... but there was one that was approved in my county's district and it sounds odd to me.

      The (Charter) School proposes to take on the "severe and persistent achievement gap" between African American and white students throughout (Anytown) County.


      I understand anyone has the option to attend, but how is this better than a neighborhood school with a massive infrastructure change? Take that school and transform it from within.

      I know a principal in the middle of the worst neighborhood in town and he has transformed the entire school from the ground up, in less than a year. He's done it without it being a charter school with less money, too. Too bad it'll take years for the scores to reflect the changes in philosophy.

      I think I recently read a statistic that charter schools have not proven to have raised test scores. And there will always be some asshat to say "well, if we kept just ONE child from turning into an ax murderer... blah blah blah." I wish I can run my business with that attitude.

    13. Senior Member FlashRedGLS1.8T's Avatar
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      05-11-2011 02:39 PM #37
      Quote Originally Posted by titleist1976 View Post
      I think I recently read a statistic that charter schools have not proven to have raised test scores.
      Do you know where you read this?

    14. Member titleist1976's Avatar
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      05-11-2011 05:31 PM #38
      I've been trying to find it since I wrote that... I'm still freaking looking. I knew someone was going to ask for an actual cite. haha

    15. Member
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      05-11-2011 10:22 PM #39
      I found the following Newsweek article on charter schools:

      http://www.newsweek.com/2010/06/13/u...r-schools.html

    16. Senior Member FlashRedGLS1.8T's Avatar
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      05-12-2011 08:01 AM #40
      Quote Originally Posted by woofster View Post
      I found the following Newsweek article on charter schools:

      http://www.newsweek.com/2010/06/13/u...r-schools.html
      Interesting story.

    17. Senior Member ClockworkChad's Avatar
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      05-12-2011 04:19 PM #41
      Quote Originally Posted by smittyATL View Post
      Public.

      I always thought private school kids were a little funny, like they just don't get the real world. Home schooled kids are even more clueless.
      this.


      ive had freinds that went to private high schools that did fantastic with the networking they were able to do at a young age and use those connections as they got older, and also some that got nothing out of it. I met private school kids with big enough allowances to fund the most serious of drug problems, and parents with enough pull to make sure no one got in trouble. my decision? say it would really depend on the kid.
      Last edited by ClockworkChad; 05-12-2011 at 04:33 PM.

    18. 05-15-2011 06:46 PM #42
      The answer to the question is obviously: it depends. If you live in a location where your kids can go to a successful and well-run school, then private/charter school probably isn't going to gain you much if you can't afford to send them to an elite-level school. There is no question that in a lot of the failing school districts that getting into high-performing charter schools is the only way for poorer children to get the quality of education they deserve.

      If I have the money to do so, I will absolutely put my kids in a private school if it offers better education than the public schools they would go to. The problem I have in Portland is that means either paying for Catlin Gabel at $20-25k per year or a religious school, which I really want to avoid.

    19. Member
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      05-20-2011 12:25 PM #43
      It's interesting if you look at the current real estate conditions in my local area, the City of Toronto, as compared to public schools. When you look at resale homes listed on the market, a vast majority of homes in good public school areas will make a mention of the public schools. When I was single and shopping for a house, I never really thought much of public schools. Now, with my first child on its way, this has quickly become a fairly significant criteria.

      Unfortunately, all the areas with good public schools are also the most desired ones. I believe this condition has driven up real estate values in those particular neighborhoods. It's gotten to the point where the cost of living in the prime public school neighborhoods might actually be more expensive than simply sending your child into a top private school!

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