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    Thread: Why did (do?) some vehicles have different keys for the doors and ignition?

    1. Geriatric Member BRealistic's Avatar
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      05-27-2011 10:14 PM #1
      I was staring at the keys for my F-150 today and was thinking.. why?





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    3. Member rimtrim's Avatar
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      05-27-2011 10:22 PM #2
      GM used to advertise this as an anti-theft feature! Probably not a very effective one, but I guess it gave them some way to respond to the fact that their '70s and '80s cars were so easy to steal. Once they switched to the PASSKey system (chipped keys) in the '90s, they got rid of the dual keys.



      ^^ Every car I've owned had a pair just like those. I even have a vintage "Delta 88" fob keyring for my current set, like the ones they used to sell on big racks at the parts stores back in the day

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    4. Member onebadbug's Avatar
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      05-27-2011 10:29 PM #3
      I've wondered the same thing myself.

      Could you imagine if they still did this with today's keys the size of bar of soap?
      Next edit by onebadbug; tomorrow at 10:13 AM.

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    5. Geriatric Member BRealistic's Avatar
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      05-27-2011 10:43 PM #4
      Quote Originally Posted by rimtrim View Post
      GM used to advertise this as an anti-theft feature! Probably not a very effective one, but I guess it gave them some way to respond to the fact that their '70s and '80s cars were so easy to steal. Once they switched to the PASSKey system (chipped keys) in the '90s, they got rid of the dual keys.



      ^^ Every car I've owned had a pair just like those. I even have a vintage "Delta 88" fob keyring for my current set, like the ones they used to sell on big racks at the parts stores back in the day

      -Andrew L
      A security device? Really?
      I guess they never thought about a person trying to get in the car quickly fumbling with the keys trying to grab the correct door and ignition keys...

      I just figured it had something to do with the tech of the time, and maybe they wanted to keep the ignition key different than the doors because using the same key for both might wear it out sooner (this was before keyless entry). (shrug)

    6. Senior Member chucchinchilla's Avatar
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      05-27-2011 10:46 PM #5
      Early Porsche cars (at least the 356) were issued 3 keys. One for the doors/ignition, one for the gear shift lock (security feature), and one for the glove box.

    7. Member jettagli1991's Avatar
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      05-27-2011 10:52 PM #6
      LOL GM keys. I don't think I even have an original ignition or door key for my '78 Pontiac. One time I lost my only set, and as luck would have it my little brother had a ton of keys that he used to collect when he was little. The 3rd one I tried started the car! I also found one that worked in the doors. I also buy and sell some glove box latches for late 90's GM cars. If I have one of the "dual cut" (or whatever the term is) keys from any GM car from that era, chances are I can get it to work perfectly in one of the dozen or so latches I have laying around. It's funny selling a Buick latch with a Chevy key.

    8. Member kamzcab86's Avatar
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      05-27-2011 11:05 PM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by duke of chucchinchilla View Post
      Early Porsche cars (at least the 356) were issued 3 keys. One for the doors/ignition, one for the gear shift lock (security feature), and one for the glove box.
      Along those lines, two VWs of the same era:

      Volkswagen Cabriolet: 1 key for all door locks + ignition + glove box, different key for gas cap
      Volkswagen Vanagon: 1 key for all door locks + ignition + gas cap, different key for glove box
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    9. Senior Member @McMike's Avatar
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      05-27-2011 11:13 PM #8
      Every one of my cars have three keys.

      Vans - door/ignition, glove box, gas cap
      Jag - Door, ignition, trunk/glovebox
      Mini - Door, ignition, trunk
      Bike - ignition, helmet lock, disk lock

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      05-28-2011 10:39 AM #9
      I have this on my Audi, but not from factory. My keyless entry broke, and the ignition key hole broke at one point, so we had to get a new one. So now, I use the old pattern to unlock the car and the new one to start it.

      Now if only I could get that to work on my Integra...

    11. 05-28-2011 01:43 PM #10
      My corrado has this too. One key to unlock it/glove box and one key to start it.

      I like it that way. I can tell someone to "go get something out of my car" without fear of them (for some reason) stealing it.

    12. Member VWestlife's Avatar
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      05-28-2011 02:51 PM #11
      Quote Originally Posted by rimtrim View Post
      GM used to advertise this as an anti-theft feature! Probably not a very effective one, but I guess it gave them some way to respond to the fact that their '70s and '80s cars were so easy to steal.
      The story I heard is that GM used such a limited number of unique key patterns back then that the different door and ingition keys were used to reduce the chance that someone would coincidentally have the same key pattern as you, and unintentionally (or not!) get in and drive away with the wrong car.
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    13. Geriatric Member BRealistic's Avatar
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      05-28-2011 03:09 PM #12
      Quote Originally Posted by corradokreep View Post
      My corrado has this too. One key to unlock it/glove box and one key to start it.

      I like it that way. I can tell someone to "go get something out of my car" without fear of them (for some reason) stealing it.
      You must have awesome friends.

    14. Geriatric Member BRealistic's Avatar
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      05-28-2011 03:12 PM #13
      Quote Originally Posted by VWestlife View Post
      The story I heard is that GM used such a limited number of unique key patterns back then that the different door and ingition keys were used to reduce the chance that someone would coincidentally have the same key pattern as you, and unintentionally (or not!) get in and drive away with the wrong car.
      Ok. Now that does make sense.-


      On that note- I know people that walked up to their vehicle in a parking lot, used the keyless entry to open the door, got in, then realized the key would not work on the ignition- then key realize they are not in their car.
      So even keyless entry has a limited number of codes.. or at least they did back in the 90s (when that happened).

    15. Member atomicalex's Avatar
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      05-28-2011 03:34 PM #14
      Quote Originally Posted by rimtrim View Post
      ^^ Every car I've owned had a pair just like those. I even have a vintage "Delta 88" fob keyring for my current set, like the ones they used to sell on big racks at the parts stores back in the day
      Andrew, seriously, if someone is going to have a weird GM comment, it is you.

      Fords were like that for years. I would leave the house with the ignition key, and not be able to get in to the car. Imagine calling your parents to let you into the car.....
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      05-28-2011 04:29 PM #15
      Since i built my car and everything is aftermarket i now have 5 keys for it. Kind of a pain but i try not to let little things like that bother me..its just a MK2 afterall

      Ignition
      Drivers door
      Passenger door
      Hatch
      Glovebox
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    17. Member green 2.slow machine's Avatar
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      05-28-2011 04:34 PM #16
      Quote Originally Posted by rimtrim View Post
      GM used to advertise this as an anti-theft feature! Probably not a very effective one, but I guess it gave them some way to respond to the fact that their '70s and '80s cars were so easy to steal. Once they switched to the PASSKey system (chipped keys) in the '90s, they got rid of the dual keys.


      -Andrew L
      I had a '94 Roadmaster with the PASSKey chip in the ignition key. Buick still saw fit use a separate key for the door.

    18. Member Lupo TDI's Avatar
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      05-28-2011 04:43 PM #17
      My Fiat has 3 keys, one for the ignition, one for the passenger door and one for the driver's door and boot lid. But I think it's because they didn't have enough locks with the sam ecode

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