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    Thread: A quick D.I.Y. Cam Chain and Tensioner *BPY engines

    1. Member
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      10-17-2016 10:38 AM #76
      Nice write-up! Used it this weekend.

      I was so glad when the cam adjuster bolt broke loose without stripping out... then I found that the locating pin on the cam adjuster broke off, like mentioned earlier here. I drilled out the pin and cut off a 5/32" drill bit to a length of 3/8" for a perfect replacement pin.

      One tip... when you are breaking loose the cam adjuster bolt, angle the breaker bar a little towards the engine so your hand is in line with the bolt. This will put less side torque on the tool and hopefully not strip the bolt head.
      Quote Originally Posted by MachnickiA3 View Post
      stick that in your "fleshy patch"

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    3. 11-02-2016 07:09 PM #77
      Thanks for the DIY. I just did this a couple weeks ago. Everything went well except for the fact that after everything was back together I realized I had not used the replacement cam adjuster bolt that came with the kit. I found some reference to the fact that you should replace the bolt. Is it an issue that I re-used the existing bolt? Is it a stretch bolt?

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      11-03-2016 12:23 AM #78
      Quote Originally Posted by mxpx09rawker View Post
      Is it a stretch bolt?
      I would assume so. Pretty much any bolt that requires a torque and then turning a set amount after the torque will be a stretch bolt.

      Did you do the proper torque and then the 1/8 turn? If so, your bolt is a little over-torqued because some of the stretch had previously been used up. There's some risk of the bolt breaking but there's also some risk of doing more damage trying to remove it. If you expect to ever remove the bolt in the future you may want to take it off now and replace it. Personally, I wouldn't bother.
      Quote Originally Posted by MachnickiA3 View Post
      stick that in your "fleshy patch"

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    6. Angry Administrator nater's Avatar
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      11-03-2016 07:10 AM #79
      According to the factory manual it is a trq to yield bolt. Replace it.


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    7. 11-06-2016 04:58 PM #80
      Thanks for the responses. I'll go ahead and replace the bolt for peace of mind.

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      11-07-2016 05:22 PM #81
      Quote Originally Posted by mxpx09rawker View Post
      Thanks for the responses. I'll go ahead and replace the bolt for peace of mind.
      I bought this 2007 GTI Fahrenheit for $2K not running. I found the timing belt had skipped some teeth and replaced it and the belt tensioner to get it running, but it sounded like a diesel so I shut it off and ordered a chain and tensioner. I pulled and cleaned out the oil pan too, finding some bits of tensioner shoe in there.

      When I opened it up I could see the tensioner had broken. The cam adjuster bolt would not release with 150 psi on the air impact gun. So after repeated attempts, I torched it with an acetylene torch for about 5 minutes and tried the impact again and it came right out. The bit I used was a T55 Torx. I know they all say not to try a Torx, but it was only $6 and just a little too big around the edges, so I ground down the outside edges just a touch until it fit and it was perfect. Using an impact gun puts way less torque on the cam holder tool, and you can press it in and keep it straight.

      I have to pull it again because I had a P0016 "cam/crank incorrect correlation" code and was told it may be off by a tooth, and to advance the intake one tooth. I had marked the chain and sprockets when I removed the old chain and put the new one on the same location, but as others have said, the intake cam leaves a little leeway for misalignment of the tool, (which I also made from stuff I had and it worked fine).

      So I went back to checking the timing belt and found the timing was 180 deg. out. The engine runs better with the belt set correctly, but I think the chain should be back where it was when I started, since I still have the code. I think VW could have done better at making initial timing setup less of a dark art.

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      11-23-2016 07:39 PM #82
      many thanks for the DIY. Came in handy today, went rather well took about four hours considering the learning curve...next time it will be under three hours. now my car is as quite as a mouse.

    10. 11-24-2016 12:07 PM #83
      Quote Originally Posted by quietA3guy View Post
      I ran for almost a year before replacing my noisy cam chain and tensioner. But mine only made noise on startup and not every time. Mostly during cold winter mornings.
      If you do this yourself I recommend being prepared to drill out the cam bolt like this guy. Despite having the proper poly-drive bit and being carfull I also stripped mine.
      Any specific way that you installed that actual chain??


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    11. 11-25-2016 01:02 PM #84
      If I remember correctly the chain gets installed on the adjuster first then as the adjuster is installed the chain is simultaneously installed on the intake cam sprocket. Note: people have reported that there is enough slack in the chain to install it one tooth off. It's probably a good idea to look at how much slack is on the old chain (top vs. bottom) and match that when installing the new chain. Also when tightening the adjuster bolt the manual recommends counter holding the intake cam. Presumably to minimize the forces applied to the cam lock tool.

      2 year update on my car: The cold weather has brought a return of the noise. I think what has happened is that I went too long in between replacing the oil filter and little bits of filter have now clogged the oil passages. When the oil is cold and thick not enough pressure is making its way to the tensioner to remove the chain slack causing the rattling.

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      11-25-2016 06:06 PM #85
      If you don't want to worry about drilling out the exh cam bolt or messing with it at all you can do it the long way...
      Take the cage off.
      Just set the car to TDC and mark the belt, take the cage off, get cam align tool, pull timing gear off (easier said than done-may need pressed off), and turn the cam that way.
      It's much longer way, but it's another option, and it's how I did mine (not by choice, by the way)...


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      12-26-2016 01:02 AM #86
      My cam adjuster rolls backwords


      I get it in time all the way forward, let go of cam with the cam wrench, and it rolls forwrds towards front of car taking it out of time, I assume my adjuster is bad, it's not locking in to place (pin is going in to cam)

      any insight?

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      12-26-2016 05:45 AM #87
      Done. Thanks again for posting this up.
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      12-26-2016 07:42 AM #88
      Quote Originally Posted by 0-60Motorsports View Post
      Done. Thanks again for posting this up.

      did your cam adjuster move?

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      12-26-2016 08:25 AM #89
      Quote Originally Posted by slawson12 View Post
      did your cam adjuster move?
      Actually I work on the car myself with my techs but I was so busy so I just had them do it as I also had to install an apt intercooler on my R. I'm at 95000km and thought this would be the best time to change all the belts and chain and tensioner etc as wel
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      12-28-2016 02:41 PM #90
      Hey folks,

      This isn't entirely related to the cam chain job (which I've already done) it's related to something I became familiar with in the process and I'm wondering if anyone can chime in. The part in question is the vacuum line with the check valve that hooks into the front of the cam chain cover (P/N - 1K0612041CH)... I've noticed that the plastic molded portion at the end of the hose that directly hooks into the cam chain cover is pretty loose. It has probably about a 1/4 inch of play. It doesn't pop out of the cover by any means but the amount of play it has seems odd, combined with the fact that there is quite a bit of gunk around that area which seems to me like dirt getting caught in an oil film so it looks like oil vapor may be escaping out from the cover in this location due to the looseness.

      When I pull the piece forward as far as it will go (1/4 inch forward or so) I can see what might actually be a little vent so, idk, maybe this thing is actually venting some pressure by design and what I'm seeing is normal but I wanted to see if anyone can chime in on this subject.

      Thanks in advance!
      400BHP / 380CTQ - 2007 B6 Passat 2.0T FSI - Weekend Track Car & Part-time Commuter

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    18. 01-07-2017 12:04 AM #91
      Quote Originally Posted by theGLIguy View Post
      A quick D.I.Y. Cam Chain and Tensioner *BPY engines
      This in not the most in depth write up ever but it will help many of you out to see what you are getting into (It's not that hard) just looks it.

      I do want to start by saying I am not responsible in anyway for your actions and anything that may happen as a result of you doing this on your own.

      The tools you will need are the following:

      T40080 - 6 point socket
      T10252 - Cam Lock
      T10020 - 2 pin cam wrench (optional)
      Ratchets - 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2"
      1/2" Breaker Bar
      Extensions for all three. 3" for the 1/4" and 6" extractions for the 3/8" and 1/2"
      T27 Socket and Screw Driver Bit
      10mm Socket
      5/8 Spark Plug Socket (optional)
      15mm Wrench
      M8 Triple square (If you have the banjo style fuel pump)
      Pick sets
      Screw Drivers, both Standard and Philips head
      Safety Glasses would be a good idea too.
      Might need a few other little things but this is most of them

      Parts you will need: - cost for parts was about $178 plus $100 for the tool kit I bought. The gaskets where all VW brand. The chain was IWIS (same as factory) as pictured and the Tensioner was from INA (same as factory) as pictured. The prices are cheaper from the companies separate compared to buying them straight from VW.
      Timing cover gasket - $9
      Valve cover gasket - $17
      Exhaust cam adjuster bolt - $4
      Timing chain - $31
      timing chain tensioner - $59
      HPFP cam follower (optional) - crazy if you don't while you already have it apart. - $50 with new bolts and gasket
      Hose clamp - to replace factory clamp on the rear pcv hose from valve cover $1
      Timing tools if you don't already have them - $100




      Step One - Remove your intake system (whatever brand you may have) This should be pretty simple. Not going to explain because so many mount differently. Make sure to cover the turbo inlet so you don't drop anything down in it. Paint can lid works pretty well.


      Step Two - Remove the battery and battery tray. (Optional) I did this this to make more room to work and I am glad I did, You will want the room to gain access and see the lower bolts on the cam cover and to wiggle the cover off.


      Step Three - Now it is time to start disconnecting all the plugs on the top end such as fuel pump connectors, Coil Packs, and N205 Valve. You will want to pull the coil packs out at this time. Also disconnect the vacuum line off the cam cover. If you have an aftermarket heat shield, this will also be a good time to take it out. You will want to disconnect the rear two hoses on the valve cover and all the hoses off the front PCV system.





      Step Four - Time to remove the fuel pump and follower. Now is also a good time to replace it since you already have to remove the old one. This is pretty simple but make sure you have rags on hand as fuel will come out when you drain the system. You will want to unscrew the cap on the bottom right of the pump and push in the tap to release the fuel pressure. This will drain fuel out so have a rag under it. After it is drained, remove the fitting from the pump to gain access to the bolt behind it. You will want to also remove the two fuel lines under the pump as well, I have the 15mm line and the Banjo bolt which is not as bad as everyone says. Put the tripple square in a socket with a 3" extension on a 1/4 drive ratchet and it comes out in less then two minute. Below is a pic showing how to do it. After they are disconnected, You can now take off the 3 bolts holding the fuel pump on and remove it.





      Step Five - Now it is time to remove the Valve cover and Cam Chain cover. You will need lots of rags and the cam cover will leak on the top of the trans. All the bolts here will be T27s. The valve cover is real simple. It's 14 bolts up top and 2 on the left side where the timing belt is. The just wiggle it side to side and it should come right off. You might need to pry at it, If you do, Just be very careful not to crack or break anything. The chain cover it a little bit of a pain to get the lower bolts and this is where you will be glad you removed the battery. There are 3 up top, 2 around the back, 1 under the fuel pump are, and 1 last little sucker under in the center, You will not be able to get it with a T27 socket, You have to have the bit and screwdriver for this guy. He was tucked up in so I couldn't get a good picture. You will also need to remove the 2 bolts shown in the second pic as well as removing the wire loom holder. The third pic is to show the bottom bolt location and how it is surrounded by the case. After all the bolts are removed from the housing you can now take it off, To do this, IT MUST COME STRAIGHT OUT THE SIDE, you might have to bend some of the medal lines slightly to do so but you don't want to break the rings in the housing by bending it around. Just be gentle and careful when doing this and you will be fine.




      Step Six - At this point, the tricky stuff is done. The rest is easy. Now we need to rotate the engine to get the cams lined up to lock them in place. It is (optional) if you want to remove the spark plugs to make this a little easier, I did to release the compression as I rotated the engine. Here is where the 2 pin cam wrench come in, You will want to slip it in the intake cam and rotate the engine around the the notch on each cam face each other, once they do, slide the locking plate in and bolt it in to 7 ft lbs. You can now press the tensioner down and insert the locking pin to hold it down.



      Step Seven - Time to remove the camshaft adjuster bolt and take the chain off. To do this, You need a the T40080 socket and a breaker bar. I had my brother hold the socket square and in while I pulled to break it loose. Don't be afraid to give it some force, they are designed to hold in there tight. Once it is out, You can then just slide the adjuster and chain right off.




      Step Eight - We can now remove the old tensioner, It is held on by 3 T27 bolts and comes right out. After it is out, Clean up the oil passage hole, mine had some build up in the screen on the tensioner. It would explain why it was ticking.






      The rest is just a matter of reverse bolting everything back up the way it came out.



      Torque specs are the following All are ft lbs.

      Cam adjuster bolt is 15 lbs plus additional 1/8 turn
      Tensioner bolt is 7 lbs
      Valve cover bolts are 7 lbs.
      Cam chain case cover is 7 lbs
      hpfp bolts are 7lbs
      banjo bolt on fuel pump is 13 lbs
      union nut on hpfp is 18 lbs

      On a scale of 1-10 on how hard, I would rate a 6. It's not hard so much as how long it takes. You really do need the special tools to get the job done though. If not, You are going to break something.

      Here is the Valve cover pattern to tighten down to 7ft Lbs.



      If you need any help, feel I left anything out, or any question, feel free to message me and I will see what I can do to help, add, fix, or change.




      Great post man, however, if im only replacing the chain tensioner, do I still need to take off the head gasket cover, or do I only need to take off the timing cover?

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      01-07-2017 10:08 AM #92
      Quote Originally Posted by arjay8p View Post




      Great post man, however, if im only replacing the chain tensioner, do I still need to take off the head gasket cover, or do I only need to take off the timing cover?
      You could do it without removing the valve cover, but you wouldn't be able to see the lobes of the cam and their alignment, or use the cam alignment tool... so I wouldn't recommend it.

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      01-07-2017 10:16 AM #93
      Also..

      Check the exhaust cam sprocket..

      Make sure the sprocket doesn't rotate when connected to the cam or it will not stay in time.

    21. 01-11-2017 11:33 AM #94
      Quote Originally Posted by groundshock View Post
      In the middle of this job now. I too have the ticking that goes away with the slightest hint of extra throttle. Opened everything up before I actually ordered the parts.

      I've found that everything visually looks OK, but that the bottom of the chain has some pretty substantial slack. Definitely would be a noisemaker if it was slapping around.

      Pics of slack:





      Funny thing about it? The chain is actually making hard contact with the lower black bolt that is mounting the tensioner. So my question for the guys that have finished this job - was there slack in the lower portion of your chain? If so, how much?



      I have revisited this thread as I had the cam chain cover off this past weekend. I'd like to talk to this point...

      My tensioner and chain are pretty new.

      My chain also does this, but I believe it is a direct result of rotating the engine with the tool that sticks in the slot in the end of the cam lobe. The tool you're supposed to use for the job. I believe by adding the rotational force to the cam directly pushes the chain slack towards the exhaust cam.

      I thought about this and decided to remove the cam lock because I wasn't actually removing the tensioner or chain anyways this time. I decided to rotate the engine via the crank instead. I used a 1/2" drive 3/4" 12 point socket in the center of the crank pulley.

      While on the ground in front of the car, and my wrench handle hanging down, I pushed towards the back of the car which rotates the engine clockwise. I only had to go 1/8 of a turn. Now, when looking at the cam chain, it was no longer resting on the bolt in the picture above and the chain was tight to the bottom of the tensioner.



      So basically I don't think the chain resting on that bolt is anything to worry about and not necessarily an indication of wear or chain stretch, in every case. Again I suspect this is simply a result of rotating the engine via that cam lobe.


      I'm not claiming I know better than anyone else. My opinion is based on my observations of my car specifically.

    22. 01-12-2017 07:12 PM #95
      I am in the process of doing this on my 2008 Passat with 166K miles. Just bought the car cheap because it wasn't running. HPFP is toast and need to pull the cam chain cover to clean out the debris from the follower and check the chain tensioner and chain. Anyhow, with regards to timing, can't I just put some marks on the timing chain and teeth of each sprocket, remove the chain, transfer the marks to the new chain and reinstall? If the old chain is intact and hasn't jumped a tooth the timing between the intake and exhaust cam is correct. As long as I have the exact same amount of chain links difference between the exhaust and intake came the timing with the new chain will be correct. I don't plan on using the cam locking tool, just going to mark the chain and teeth, hold the intake cam in the slot with a home made tool and remove the adjuster. Just curious if I am missing anything? Do I need to have the exhaust cam locked down or will the chain transfer the torque to the intake cam that I will be holding with my home made tool. Is there any risk of damage to the adjuster? What is the dowel pin that I am reading about on the adjuster and where is it located?

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      01-13-2017 08:22 PM #96
      Quote Originally Posted by kjr6306 View Post
      I am in the process of doing this on my 2008 Passat with 166K miles. Just bought the car cheap because it wasn't running. HPFP is toast and need to pull the cam chain cover to clean out the debris from the follower and check the chain tensioner and chain. Anyhow, with regards to timing, can't I just put some marks on the timing chain and teeth of each sprocket, remove the chain, transfer the marks to the new chain and reinstall? If the old chain is intact and hasn't jumped a tooth the timing between the intake and exhaust cam is correct. As long as I have the exact same amount of chain links difference between the exhaust and intake came the timing with the new chain will be correct. I don't plan on using the cam locking tool, just going to mark the chain and teeth, hold the intake cam in the slot with a home made tool and remove the adjuster. Just curious if I am missing anything? Do I need to have the exhaust cam locked down or will the chain transfer the torque to the intake cam that I will be holding with my home made tool. Is there any risk of damage to the adjuster? What is the dowel pin that I am reading about on the adjuster and where is it located?
      The dowel pin is on the back of the exhaust cam sprocket, and the chain links won't do you any good

      Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk

    24. 01-16-2017 03:46 AM #97
      Care to elaborate? The links won't do any good for what? Holding the adjuster while removing the bolt or using the marks to make sure the cams are timed correctly?

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      01-16-2017 12:19 PM #98
      Quote Originally Posted by kjr6306 View Post
      Care to elaborate? The links won't do any good for what? Holding the adjuster while removing the bolt or using the marks to make sure the cams are timed correctly?
      If your cam is out of time before taking it off, your marks are useless bud.

      Use the service manual available on Volkswagen workshop it will tell you exactly what to do.

      Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk

    26. 01-17-2017 09:42 AM #99
      Where does it say in my post that the cams are out of time? My cam chain is intact and the vehicle is currently timed correctly. If I mark the chain and both sprockets precisely and reinstall the new chain in exactly the same place the cams will be timed correctly. YES OR NO?

    27. Angry Administrator nater's Avatar
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      01-17-2017 11:28 AM #100
      Quote Originally Posted by kjr6306 View Post
      Where does it say in my post that the cams are out of time? My cam chain is intact and the vehicle is currently timed correctly. If I mark the chain and both sprockets precisely and reinstall the new chain in exactly the same place the cams will be timed correctly. YES OR NO?
      Well, you stated that you just picked up the car and it doesn't run. Most likely due to HPFP but who knows. I guess he's trying to tell you to start fresh if you're going to be in there.
      Get the cam locking tool, if you take the chain off one of the cams may move slightly and you'll be in trouble. Get it at TDC, lock the tool/cams in place, then just swap the chains (counting links if you want).
      Spin the engine more than once/twice and make sure ALL marks align and voila!

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