VWVortex.com - We bought a aircooled bus to travel the country in...
Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    VWVortex


    The Car Lounge
    Page 2 of 21 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast
    Results 26 to 50 of 523

    Thread: We bought a aircooled bus to travel the country in...

    1. Geriatric Member Air and water do mix's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 5th, 2004
      Location
      Southern Indiana
      Posts
      40,922
      Vehicles
      '66 Beetle (X2) '08 Fit
      06-01-2016 10:38 AM #26
      Quote Originally Posted by jai5 View Post
      Stupid question: Does it have AC?

      As for safety standpoint, how well would this do in an accident?
      How's the wind noise when travelling at highway speeds?

      I like the idea of a camper van, but a modern one. But unfortunately can't think of one that I could afford.
      That one does not, but A/C got more common in the later busses. Wind noise and safety isn't as bad as you'd think, but neither are exactly 'good', either. Engine noise is no problem at all, though!

      Quote Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
      I was referring that if I can see that much rust in the pictures, I wonder how rust or not rusty the rest of it is, is all. I don't know a whole ton about these or where they can rust and be repaired without real treat to structure and such.
      Yeah, it's always worse than it is in pictures, but these things tend to be pretty solid even after they have big holes in them. It's the non-structural bits that tend to hold water and rust out. Leaky windshields rust the outer front floors and the drain holes in the rocker panels get plugged up with dirt, hold water and the rockers go away quickly after that. The 'ladder frame' underneath tends to hold up extremely well and that carries the lion's share of the load.
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    2. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements
       

    3. Member Zman86's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 5th, 2010
      Location
      Onterrible, Canada
      Posts
      1,968
      Vehicles
      1990 Volvo 240 sedan, 1972 VW camper van, 1993 Volvo 240 wagon, 1989 Ford Festiva, 2014 Ford Fiesta
      06-01-2016 10:38 AM #27
      To answer some of the questions, yes it has rust. Some on rockers, bit on the outriggers, rear quarters and battery trays. Front floor has been replaced. It was deemed a solid restoration candidate by the shop I had inspect it. We were nowhere even close to affording a rust free/restored example.
      Biggest issue at the moment is it will not start without a boost, has two crappy batteries that are not properly secured in it currently. I've been told these things not starting is a common issue, so if anyone can shed some light on that, it would be much appreciated.

      It does not have AC.

      I do believe it started life as a panel van, I thought Kombi meant panel. Aircooled newb...

      From a safety standpoint, I wouldn't want to be in an accident in it. Same can be said for my Ford Festiva

      Wind noise was actually minimal. It has a lot of interior squeaks and rattles that need attention.

      It has a pertronix ignition in it

      I was told that the carbs are webers, though I thought I saw an Empi stamp while I was poking around the engine bay yesterday.

      The bus came with new throttle and clutch cables. The clutch/shifting in general is awful, that's going to be addressed before any serious driving

      It drives nice, straight and smooth, smoother than I thought (bringing it home from the shipping depot was the first time I've ever driven an aircooled VW), Despite all the shock bushings being shrunk and sloppy ( a set of konis are on the short list).

      Drove great in the highway at 60-65mph

      The short list of repairs is clean and disinfect the entire thing, get it shifting smoothly, service the brakes, service the wheel bearings, oil change, new batteries, new seats (drivers is destroyed)

    4. Member al@absolute's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 12th, 2005
      Location
      Scoudouc N.B
      Posts
      5,640
      Vehicles
      the big three and a deere
      06-01-2016 10:43 AM #28
      Quote Originally Posted by Air and water do mix View Post
      That one does not, but A/C got more common in the later busses. Wind noise and safety isn't as bad as you'd think, but neither are exactly 'good', either. Engine noise is no problem at all, though!



      Yeah, it's always worse than it is in pictures, but these things tend to be pretty solid even after they have big holes in them. It's the non-structural bits that tend to hold water and rust out. Leaky windshields rust the outer front floors and the drain holes in the rocker panels get plugged up with dirt, hold water and the rockers go away quickly after that. The 'ladder frame' underneath tends to hold up extremely well and that carries the lion's share of the load.
      that's what I wanted to hear and know about
      14 Mustang GT | 87 Buick Grand National | 37 Plymouth Coupe | 13 Focus 5door | 13 F250 XLT 6.7

    5. Member VWmk3GTI's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2013
      Posts
      1,292
      Vehicles
      1998 Golf GTI, 1968 Beetle,2003 Passat GLX,Some mini bikes
      06-01-2016 11:07 AM #29
      I hope you'll keep us posted through the repair work as well
      Quote Originally Posted by PlatinumGLS View Post
      I’m not judgmental, so when I see a person push the wrong pedal, I never assume what gender she is.
      Quote Originally Posted by Crimping Is Easy View Post
      Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in his shoes. That way, when you criticize him, you're a mile away and you have his shoes.

    6. Member Zman86's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 5th, 2010
      Location
      Onterrible, Canada
      Posts
      1,968
      Vehicles
      1990 Volvo 240 sedan, 1972 VW camper van, 1993 Volvo 240 wagon, 1989 Ford Festiva, 2014 Ford Fiesta
      06-01-2016 11:24 AM #30
      Quote Originally Posted by VWmk3GTI View Post
      I hope you'll keep us posted through the repair work as well
      I'll be recording all repairs done as well as our travels in it here.

    7. Senior Member AZGolf's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 6th, 2000
      Location
      Phoenix area
      Posts
      32,918
      06-01-2016 11:41 AM #31
      Quote Originally Posted by Zman86 View Post
      It's first big trip is supposed to be to Speedweek at Bonneville in August.
      So.... how do you plan to keep cool for long summertime drives in the desert, or do you just bring a lot a exercise clothes to sweat in and plenty of water?

    8. Member zaYG's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 28th, 2009
      Location
      Somerville, MA
      Posts
      3,571
      Vehicles
      2006 Cannondale Six13
      06-01-2016 12:26 PM #32
      Quote Originally Posted by GoHomePossum View Post
      Are these reliable enough to drive long distances given their age?
      My friend did a road trip last summer across the entire US and back for 3 weeks. He made a thread here asking what to buy, even though he wanted a W126, and was continually told not to get it due to reliability. He ended up going with his heart and bought a $600 190k+ W126 in "rough-around-the-edges" condition. The car made it across the US and back while being pushed to the absolute limit (PCH at 10/10ths, 120+ for extended periods of time in the desert) without a single issue.

      If that beast can handle it, I'm sure an aircooled VW can easily handle long distances and will be a cinch to fix if it does break down.

    9. Geriatric Member Air and water do mix's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 5th, 2004
      Location
      Southern Indiana
      Posts
      40,922
      Vehicles
      '66 Beetle (X2) '08 Fit
      06-01-2016 12:34 PM #33
      Quote Originally Posted by Zman86 View Post
      To answer some of the questions, yes it has rust. Some on rockers, bit on the outriggers, rear quarters and battery trays. Front floor has been replaced. It was deemed a solid restoration candidate by the shop I had inspect it. We were nowhere even close to affording a rust free/restored example.
      Biggest issue at the moment is it will not start without a boost, has two crappy batteries that are not properly secured in it currently. I've been told these things not starting is a common issue, so if anyone can shed some light on that, it would be much appreciated.

      It does not have AC.

      I do believe it started life as a panel van, I thought Kombi meant panel. Aircooled newb...

      From a safety standpoint, I wouldn't want to be in an accident in it. Same can be said for my Ford Festiva

      Wind noise was actually minimal. It has a lot of interior squeaks and rattles that need attention.

      It has a pertronix ignition in it

      I was told that the carbs are webers, though I thought I saw an Empi stamp while I was poking around the engine bay yesterday.

      The bus came with new throttle and clutch cables. The clutch/shifting in general is awful, that's going to be addressed before any serious driving

      It drives nice, straight and smooth, smoother than I thought (bringing it home from the shipping depot was the first time I've ever driven an aircooled VW), Despite all the shock bushings being shrunk and sloppy ( a set of konis are on the short list).

      Drove great in the highway at 60-65mph

      The short list of repairs is clean and disinfect the entire thing, get it shifting smoothly, service the brakes, service the wheel bearings, oil change, new batteries, new seats (drivers is destroyed)
      The starting issue is a common one. Bosch solenoids are sensitive to low voltage situations, and the current has to get from the battery, all the way up front, through the ignition switch and back to the solenoid, so that's a long trip through 40 year old wires!! The fix is to use a good quality Ford remote starter solenoid, which kicks over quite easily and supplies more voltage to the original solenoid because of the shortened path. You simply put the solenoid wire from the original Bosch unit onto the Ford "S" terminal and run current from the battery through the big posts (using heavy wire) where the battery cable normally goes. Now when the Ford unit is triggered the power goes from the battery, through new (larger) wires, through the Ford solenoid and straight to the Bosch solenoid. The entire path is probably two feet. "Double the length of a wire and you double the resistance, double the diameter and you cut the resistance in half." Now you're sending it through wires with only a percentage of the resistance of the originals.



      In this case you won't need to worry about the "I" terminal, since that's a stock Ford ignition thing. Some solenoids don't have it, but most do nowadays since it works for both applications.


      If the carburetors say EMPI, then they're copies of Weber IDFs but Weber parts will fit them, unless there's some compatibility issue with machining quality. I understand they're pretty good and they cost a few hundred less than Webers, so some people go for them.

      The biggest shifter issues are probably the bushing under the shifter and the shift coupler. Those are cheap and easy to replace, but if there's still too much slop then you're looking at getting inside the transmission nose cone. It's not fully inside the gearbox, but it does require the engine/trans to come out since it mounts on that same nose cone. A Scat Drag-Fast shifter will go a long way towards making up for the slop inside the transaxle, though. You'll have the added bonus of actually being able to reach third gear!


      Good luck! I'll keep an eye out for questions and such.
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    10. Senior Member AZGolf's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 6th, 2000
      Location
      Phoenix area
      Posts
      32,918
      06-01-2016 01:01 PM #34
      Quote Originally Posted by zaYG View Post
      My friend did a road trip last summer across the entire US and back for 3 weeks. He made a thread here asking what to buy, even though he wanted a W126, and was continually told not to get it due to reliability. He ended up going with his heart and bought a $600 190k+ W126 in "rough-around-the-edges" condition. The car made it across the US and back while being pushed to the absolute limit (PCH at 10/10ths, 120+ for extended periods of time in the desert) without a single issue.

      If that beast can handle it, I'm sure an aircooled VW can easily handle long distances and will be a cinch to fix if it does break down.
      Selective optimism. You may as well say "My friend won the lottery by buying one ticket, and my friend is stupid. If my friend can win the lottery with one ticket, anybody can do it."

    11. Member Zman86's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 5th, 2010
      Location
      Onterrible, Canada
      Posts
      1,968
      Vehicles
      1990 Volvo 240 sedan, 1972 VW camper van, 1993 Volvo 240 wagon, 1989 Ford Festiva, 2014 Ford Fiesta
      06-01-2016 02:08 PM #35
      Our golf overheated it's tranny in Omaha, Nebraska, 1700km into our trip. Took it to a VW dealer, who wrongly condemned the transmission (it's a whole giant story after that. We were on a schedule to make it to a wedding in Vegas. Ended up in a Ford Focus rental. I thought for sure the car would be fine, just goes to show you never know what will happen.

      As for the no AC, plenty of crappy clothes and lots of water. The bus has lots of windows that open as well.

    12. Member
      Join Date
      Apr 30th, 2013
      Location
      Minneapolis
      Posts
      994
      Vehicles
      '04 Reflex Silver GLI, '99 Jetta Wolfsburg (RIP)
      06-01-2016 02:16 PM #36
      Quote Originally Posted by Air and water do mix View Post
      If they're well sorted, yes.

      The engines are quite robust. As long as the cables, brake system, wheel bearings and wiring are all in good shape it just comes down to a healthy engine/trans. I'd pack an extra distributor loaded with a Pertronix ignition system, throttle/clutch cables, a couple of carb kits, filters, oil, fuel pump, gasket set and a decent set of tools and head right out. I might also take an axel, wheel bearings, grease, trans oil and spare wire/connectors/wiring tool if I were going long distances between cities.
      so what you're saying is just tow a donor car filled with parts behind you?

    13. 06-01-2016 02:19 PM #37

    14. Member Mikewastaken's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 13th, 2002
      Location
      CePA
      Posts
      2,525
      Vehicles
      07 V50 T5 AWD 6MT, 13 C-Max Hybrid
      06-01-2016 02:27 PM #38
      Quote Originally Posted by Air and water do mix View Post
      If they're well sorted, yes.

      The engines are quite robust. As long as the cables, brake system, wheel bearings and wiring are all in good shape it just comes down to a healthy engine/trans. I'd pack an extra distributor loaded with a Pertronix ignition system, throttle/clutch cables, a couple of carb kits, filters, oil, fuel pump, gasket set and a decent set of tools and head right out. I might also take an axel, wheel bearings, grease, trans oil and spare wire/connectors/wiring tool if I were going long distances between cities.
      It probably wouldn't stop me but to me that's a "no."

    15. Member simple's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 29th, 2001
      Location
      Golden, CO
      Posts
      4,190
      Vehicles
      Q5 TDi, Sportsmobile Van, Mazda CX-5
      06-01-2016 02:57 PM #39
      Quote Originally Posted by MN Mongo View Post
      so what you're saying is just tow a donor car filled with parts behind you?
      If you can't measure it, you can't understand it; if you can't understand it, you can't control it.

      As said on BAT "We’ll burn this guy to high hell for lowering his car but we will bid 6 figures on safari builds. Come on son" - 2mAn

    16. Geriatric Member Air and water do mix's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 5th, 2004
      Location
      Southern Indiana
      Posts
      40,922
      Vehicles
      '66 Beetle (X2) '08 Fit
      06-01-2016 03:35 PM #40
      Quote Originally Posted by MN Mongo View Post
      so what you're saying is just tow a donor car filled with parts behind you?
      Nope. All of that would fit inside of a small tool box. With tools.

      Quote Originally Posted by Mikewastaken View Post
      It probably wouldn't stop me but to me that's a "no."
      No, that's my own personal paranoia. I'd do the same with any 40 year old car. The difference is that with old cars you can make repairs nearly anywhere with just a few things, but on modern cars you can't unless you can get parts and have more specialized tools.
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    17. Member Zman86's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 5th, 2010
      Location
      Onterrible, Canada
      Posts
      1,968
      Vehicles
      1990 Volvo 240 sedan, 1972 VW camper van, 1993 Volvo 240 wagon, 1989 Ford Festiva, 2014 Ford Fiesta
      06-01-2016 03:42 PM #41
      We plan on purchasing a small vintage toolbox to stock with bus tools and supplies

    18. Member syncro87's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 24th, 2000
      Location
      KLXT
      Posts
      6,113
      Vehicles
      '88 BMW R100RT
      06-01-2016 03:43 PM #42
      Ah, yes.

      I spent many miles as a passenger or behind the wheel of my dad's '72 Westfalia. We went all over the eastern half of the USA, and some of eastern Canada, in that thing.

      Things I remember about ours:

      Heat, of course, was mediocre, and was downright awful if it was really cold outside. Ours didn't have A/C, but this was back in the day where a ton of people owned cars that didn't have air conditioning. So you sweated it out. Not the end of the world. If you're moving at 50+ mph and are sitting up front, it wasn't too bad. Rear passengers had it worse off, less air flow for hot weather, less heat in cold.

      I remember ours being happiest at 55-60 mph. It would go faster, of course, but you got the feeling you were hammering it a bit too much at much above 60 mph. 65, yeah, maybe you could do that long term. I probably wouldn't drive one at 70+ day in and day out on a trip. 60 seems to be where they are happiest, and could go on forever at that pace. MPG isn't a strong point at any speed, but again, 60 or less nets you fairly decent MPG, while at 65 or more you really start to notice fuel consumption rise.

      Not the best vehicle for windy days. Midwest or Great Plains states, open highway, and windy day make the bus a bit of a handful. Nothing you can't manage, but it gets old after a while. Actually, this is something to keep in mind in general. A 70's VW van does not have handling and braking on the level of the average 2016 economy sedan. You have to drive accordingly, and a bit more cautiously.

      Loaded down with people and gear, not the best choice for mountainous terrain, obviously.

      My dad was pretty meticulous with maintenance, and had owned many air cooled VWs, so he kept ours in tip top shape. However, despite this, there was always some niggly little thing that was going wrong or needed to be fixed when there was time. As long as you had tools, access to some spares, and a working knowledge of air cooled VWs, you were good to go. Parts are still totally available for the buses, but probably not stocked quite as well in as many places as they were in the 1980s when we had ours. Of course, you now have the internet and next day air combo, so you'll probably be fine in this regard.

      This next one is from my Vanagon days (yes I realize this is a T2 not a V-gon), so someone smarter than me here can opine more intelligently on this one, but throwing it out there. Tires are pretty important on these, and people often run the wrong/inferior tires. I know that if you ran higher load rating (C?) tires on the Vanagons, they handled a LOT better in wind, cornering, etc. A lot of people cheaped out and ran straight passenger tires on them, which had sidewalls that were too soft, and the vans handled poorly. The Vanagons I had all drove significantly better when outfitted with proper tires. It's been over a decade since I had my last Vanagon, so memory foggy on this one. I only mention it so that someone else might give you better information than me on the subject. I recall the Buses being similar to the later Vanagons in this regard, but not positive. In other words, make sure you have the proper, good quality tires before your trip.

      There is a bit of a learning curve to owning air cooled VWs. Nothing major, just stuff you get familiar with when you're around them for a while. I would suggest taking, at the very least, the Muir "keep your VW alive" book with you, as well as a Bentley Manual.

      Interesting anecdote: A black bear once ran out of the woods right into the path of my dad and our Westy. He was unable to avoid it and hit it pretty much dead on. The front of the bus was somewhat concave after that, but repairable. The bear, sadly, was not repairable.

      Summary: A late model minivan would be 10x more comfortable than a bus for a cross country trip, far safer in the event of an accident, better on fuel, and probably less likely to break. However, a VW bus has 10x the personality of said modern van, and is a far more interesting choice.

      Many, many fond memories of ours.

      Very old pic of Dad, myself, and sister long ago somewhere along the Blue Ridge Parkway, if I'm not mistaken:

      Last edited by syncro87; 06-01-2016 at 03:51 PM.

    19. Senior Member .LSinLV.'s Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 13th, 2009
      Location
      Vegas Bitches!
      Posts
      33,223
      Vehicles
      12' V6 TDI ........ 00' VR6T ..........72' 914-6.................15' Honda CTX700N
      06-01-2016 04:56 PM #43
      Last edited by .LSinLV.; 06-01-2016 at 04:59 PM.
      Larry
      Demokratikally Elekted Minister of Shekels and Cuddles Therapist of the Independent People's Republik of Offtopikstan
      Quote Originally Posted by atomicalex View Post
      The boobs. I am waiting on the boobs here.

    20. Banned ChillOutPossum's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 7th, 2007
      Location
      KLPR
      Posts
      18,568
      Vehicles
      '14 GMC Sierra, '88 Mitsubishi Jeep CJ3B
      06-01-2016 05:09 PM #44
      Quote Originally Posted by syncro87 View Post

      Heat, of course, was mediocre, and was downright awful if it was really cold outside. Ours didn't have A/C, but this was back in the day where a ton of people owned cars that didn't have air conditioning. So you sweated it out. Not the end of the world. If you're moving at 50+ mph and are sitting up front, it wasn't too bad. Rear passengers had it worse off, less air flow for hot weather, less heat in cold.

      I remember ours being happiest at 55-60 mph. It would go faster, of course, but you got the feeling you were hammering it a bit too much at much above 60 mph. 65, yeah, maybe you could do that long term. I probably wouldn't drive one at 70+ day in and day out on a trip. 60 seems to be where they are happiest, and could go on forever at that pace. MPG isn't a strong point at any speed, but again, 60 or less nets you fairly decent MPG, while at 65 or more you really start to notice fuel consumption rise.

      Not the best vehicle for windy days. Midwest or Great Plains states, open highway, and windy day make the bus a bit of a handful. Nothing you can't manage, but it gets old after a while. Actually, this is something to keep in mind in general. A 70's VW van does not have handling and braking on the level of the average 2016 economy sedan. You have to drive accordingly, and a bit more cautiously.

      Loaded down with people and gear, not the best choice for mountainous terrain, obviously.

      My dad was pretty meticulous with maintenance, and had owned many air cooled VWs, so he kept ours in tip top shape. However, despite this, there was always some niggly little thing that was going wrong or needed to be fixed when there was time. As long as you had tools, access to some spares, and a working knowledge of air cooled VWs, you were good to go. Parts are still totally available for the buses, but probably not stocked quite as well in as many places as they were in the 1980s when we had ours. Of course, you now have the internet and next day air combo, so you'll probably be fine in this regard.

      This next one is from my Vanagon days (yes I realize this is a T2 not a V-gon), so someone smarter than me here can opine more intelligently on this one, but throwing it out there. Tires are pretty important on these, and people often run the wrong/inferior tires. I know that if you ran higher load rating (C?) tires on the Vanagons, they handled a LOT better in wind, cornering, etc. A lot of people cheaped out and ran straight passenger tires on them, which had sidewalls that were too soft, and the vans handled poorly. The Vanagons I had all drove significantly better when outfitted with proper tires. It's been over a decade since I had my last Vanagon, so memory foggy on this one. I only mention it so that someone else might give you better information than me on the subject. I recall the Buses being similar to the later Vanagons in this regard, but not positive. In other words, make sure you have the proper, good quality tires before your trip.
      So basically, it's the wurst possible choice for a vehicle to travel the country in

    21. Member Zman86's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 5th, 2010
      Location
      Onterrible, Canada
      Posts
      1,968
      Vehicles
      1990 Volvo 240 sedan, 1972 VW camper van, 1993 Volvo 240 wagon, 1989 Ford Festiva, 2014 Ford Fiesta
      06-01-2016 10:21 PM #45
      Pretty much, I've always wanted one anyways. I like how they look, and I'm more of a tinkerer than anything. I fix trucks that run in a steel mill, same things break over and over, it's refreshing from doing that all day to come home and start learning about something new again.

      I fixed my first aircooled problem tonight. The valvecover gasket somehow was pushed up in the bottom right corner. A dab of silicone to keep it in place till new gaskets arrive solved the large leak. Now to clean all the oil out of the entire left outside corner that's on everything.



      Also replaced one of the dead batteries with my trusty Optima red top that's been in every vehicle I've owned since '08. Fired right up. Plan is to replace both batteries with Optimas when we have the money. Also have to talk to the guy who wired in the solar panel to see what it's all about. There's a digital controller in the engine compartment that doesn't seem to be working.

    22. Member onebadbug's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 21st, 2002
      Location
      Youngstown, Oh
      Posts
      4,411
      Vehicles
      96 Cherokee 4.0, 82 Rabbit Truck
      06-01-2016 10:21 PM #46
      Congratulations on the Bus.

      I do wonder though, how bad does a 57 Chevy drive to make a 72 bus more better for long distance driving?
      Next edit by onebadbug; tomorrow at 10:13 AM.

      What you get isn't always what you see.

    23. Member Zman86's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 5th, 2010
      Location
      Onterrible, Canada
      Posts
      1,968
      Vehicles
      1990 Volvo 240 sedan, 1972 VW camper van, 1993 Volvo 240 wagon, 1989 Ford Festiva, 2014 Ford Fiesta
      06-01-2016 10:28 PM #47
      It drove alright, just wasn't for me.

      The bus drives really well actually, I can't wait to feel it with new shocks.

    24. Geriatric Member Air and water do mix's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 5th, 2004
      Location
      Southern Indiana
      Posts
      40,922
      Vehicles
      '66 Beetle (X2) '08 Fit
      06-01-2016 11:52 PM #48
      Yep. A solid late model drives pretty well unless it's windy. The clutch feels light, the controls are smooth and no power steering is required (and you don't miss it). The early ones are crude by comparison. The heavy reduction boxes at the end of the axles really limit ride quality and how you can put power down (You'd have to look at the swing axle/reduction box setup on the early Type II to see what I mean. It's far from ideal - from a handling standpoint.) While the layout is similar everything is far more refined in the late models. (If I didn't mention it a '68 or later is considered a "late model")

      Since its cranking over well now, don't put the solenoid on the starter. I only use that if I can't get good enough connections without a major retiring job. Clean every connection including the ground strap at the front transmission mount. Those often are forgotten and you then have poor grounds or its grounding through the throttle/clutch cable.

      Also, you might have a crankcase breathing problem if it's trying to suck up the valve cover gaskets. I'd look into it. As far as I'm concerned Fel-Pro valve cover gaskets are the best. If you have solid lifters (and a '72 should) then you'll need to adjust the valves periodically. The trick I'd use is to glue the Fel-Pro gaskets into the valve cover with weatherstrip adhesive (I don't like silicone) and oil it on the head side just put on a nice coating of oil. The covers will pop right off at your next valve adjustment and you'll just need to re-oil them before clipping them in place again.
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    25. Planters (fasciitis) peanuts. Dang dogg Sold Over Sticker's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 28th, 2009
      Posts
      16,295
      06-01-2016 11:55 PM #49
      Awesome! I just listened to the DWA podcast where they interviewed a guy who owns Vantigo, an air cooled bus tour of San Fran and the surrounding areas. I can't wait to go on one of their beer tours.

      I would caution you against driving that on the salt at Speed Week. That place hammered my Uncles Excurison. They have little wash stations as you leave the salt, but you'll never get it all off. Assuming rust doesn't scare you, go for it, but I was surprised what it did to a modern truck.
      Driving While Awesome Podcast. Give it a listen.
      Quote Originally Posted by Phillie Phanatic
      SoS - please shoot a message when Brendan & His Retarded Sycophants has another gig. I’ll be there, front row.

    26. Member MagicBus's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 3rd, 2003
      Location
      Worcester, MA
      Posts
      3,688
      Vehicles
      1991 VW Vanagon, 1983 Mercedes-Benz 240D, 1998 Volvo S70
      06-01-2016 11:59 PM #50
      Quote Originally Posted by syncro87 View Post
      This next one is from my Vanagon days (yes I realize this is a T2 not a V-gon), so someone smarter than me here can opine more intelligently on this one, but throwing it out there. Tires are pretty important on these, and people often run the wrong/inferior tires. I know that if you ran higher load rating (C?) tires on the Vanagons, they handled a LOT better in wind, cornering, etc. A lot of people cheaped out and ran straight passenger tires on them, which had sidewalls that were too soft, and the vans handled poorly. The Vanagons I had all drove significantly better when outfitted with proper tires. It's been over a decade since I had my last Vanagon, so memory foggy on this one. I only mention it so that someone else might give you better information than me on the subject. I recall the Buses being similar to the later Vanagons in this regard, but not positive. In other words, make sure you have the proper, good quality tires before your trip.
      DING! DING! DING!
      What this guy says
      <------- (Vanagon owner since 2003)


      Quote Originally Posted by GoHomePossum View Post
      So basically, it's the wurst possible choice for a vehicle to travel the country in
      What you did there, Possum - I see it.

    Page 2 of 21 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •